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New policy: query

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  • edwardripleyduggan
    Hi All, i took a couple of days out to go backpacking (a long, buggy bushwhack in unfamiliar terrain--great fun). I m seeing notices regarding a Policy
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 25, 2005
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      Hi All,

      i took a couple of days out to go backpacking (a long, buggy bushwhack
      in unfamiliar terrain--great fun). I'm seeing notices regarding a
      "Policy Change" but I can't for the life of me find the original
      message, either on Yahoo or in my BGT mailboxes. Help, someone? Please
      reply direct to erd@....

      Ted.
    • RonC
      Try this: Dear All As you may be aware from the test call for the Dunham Alcatraz test, the test period for this test has been reduced to four months. This
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 25, 2005
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        Try this:

        Dear All

        As you may be aware from the test call for the Dunham
        Alcatraz test, the
        test period for this test has been reduced to four
        months. This change in
        test program is being extended and takes effect from
        June 24, 2005. Also
        with this change we are clarifying our minimum
        expectations in terms of
        testing "nights."

        Please note that all current tests are NOT affected by
        the change in
        long-term testing period. This change applies to all
        NEW tests only
        including the Dunham Alcatraz test.

        Should you wish to discuss this policy announcement,
        please respond in our
        support group, BGTWeb which you can find at
        <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BGTweb/>

        Thanks
        Andrew Priest
        List Moderator
        cc BGTWeb

        ========================

        TESTING TIME FRAME - EXPECTATIONS POLICY

        Testing Time Frame

        The standard test period is four (4) months. The
        timeframe for the three
        test reports is thus:

        Initial Report: Within seven days of receipt
        of the test item
        Field Report: Two months after all Initial
        Reports are posted to
        the list. Set by the List Moderator.
        Long-term Report: Four months after all Initial
        Reports are posted to
        the list. Set by the List Moderator

        At the discretion of the Moderator group, the testing
        time frame may be
        changed for specific tests.

        Minimum Test Expectations

        In agreeing to undertake a test, you as the tester are
        making a commitment
        to both BackpackGearTest.org and the manufacturer to
        use the item
        sufficiently to ensure that a full and comprehensive
        series of reports can
        be written.

        The minimum expectation of usage is defined as a
        minimum of two (2) test
        nights during the field testing phase and five (5)
        test nights overall. In
        applying for a test you must clearly show in your
        application how you will
        meet these minimum expectations or ideally extend
        these expectations.

        In both your field report and long-term report a clear
        upfront statement
        showing how you have met your commitment as outlined
        in your test
        application should be given.

        Please also note the following:
        * The Moderator group understands that "nights"
        testing may not always
        be the most suitable measure of testing. Common sense
        will apply. Where
        "nights" is not an appropriate indicator of testing,
        you should still show
        in your application how you will meet our minimum
        expectations in another
        equivalent form. The statements in both the field and
        long-term reports
        still apply.
        * Variations in the test timeframe may also result
        in changes to the
        minimum expectations. In these situations an
        appropriate variation will be
        made by the Moderator group.
        ========================



        --- edwardripleyduggan <erd@...> wrote:

        > Hi All,
        >
        > i took a couple of days out to go backpacking (a
        > long, buggy bushwhack
        > in unfamiliar terrain--great fun). I'm seeing
        > notices regarding a
        > "Policy Change" but I can't for the life of me find
        > the original
        > message, either on Yahoo or in my BGT mailboxes.
        > Help, someone? Please
        > reply direct to erd@....
        >
        > Ted.
        >
        >
        >


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • Edward Ripley-Duggan
        Thanks, all. Looks like a good change. Best, Ted. Reply to: erd@wilsey.net WILSEY RARE BOOKS, MEMBER ABAA http://www.wilsey.net Phone: (845) 657-7057 Fax:
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 25, 2005
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          Thanks, all. Looks like a good change.

          Best,

          Ted.

          Reply to: erd@...
          WILSEY RARE BOOKS, MEMBER ABAA
          http://www.wilsey.net
          Phone: (845) 657-7057 Fax: (845) 657-2366
        • Shandra Hunt
          Thanks Andre, these were all reasonable edits, I have updated my report. There is an html version in the test folder. Shandra Initial Report - Black Diamond
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 30, 2005
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            Thanks Andre, these were all reasonable edits, I have
            updated my report. There is an html version in the
            test folder. Shandra

            Initial Report - Black Diamond Terra CF Trekking Poes
            Name: Shandra Hunt
            Age: 26
            Gender: Female
            Height: 5' 3" (1.6 m)
            Weight: 145 lbs (66 kg)
            Location: Ben Lomond,California
            Email: jns170@...
            Date: 6/29/05
            Biography:
            Growing up in the Santa Cruz mountains, I have
            always been an avid hiker and camper. Only recently
            however, I have evolved into a backpacker. I started
            backpacking about three years ago. Since then I have
            done many trips throughout California and the
            Southwest. I spent five days packing in Grand Canyon,
            which fueled my love for the sport even more. I try to
            backpack as often as possible, I think I may be
            addicted and I am constantly looking for more
            efficient and lightweight alternatives for the gear
            that I own.
            Product Information:
            Black Diamond Terra CF Trekking Poles
            Manufacturer: Black Diamond Equipment Ltd.
            Year of Manufacture: 2005
            URL: www.blackdiamondequipment.com
            Listed Weight: 1 lb 3 oz (540 g)
            Measured weight: 1 lb 3 oz (540 g)
            Listed collapsed Size: 28 in (71 cm)
            Measured collapsed size: 27.5 in (70 cm)
            Usable Range: 41 in (105 cm) - 55 in (140 cm)
            Product Description:
            The Black Diamond Terra CF poles are advertised
            by the Black Diamond company as their top of the line
            performance trekking poles. These poles are comprised
            of three main sections. The top and bottom sections of
            the poles are made of aluminum and the middle section
            is made of carbon fiber. The top section of the poles
            is 22 in (56 cm) long and has a foam covered handle
            that features a 15º corrective angle and a non-slip
            foam grip. The handle grip is 5 in (12.7 cm) long by 4
            in (10.2 cm) in diameter and contoured to comfortably
            fit the hand. These poles have a unique hybrid top
            knob grip that is designed to increase downhill grip
            and control. The handle has a wrist loop that is
            tapered on the ends, measures 8 in (20.3 cm) long and
            is 1.5 in (3.8 cm) at its widest point. The top
            section of the Terra CF poles is a metallic blue color
            with the Black Diamond logo in metallic silver and
            measures 2.5 in (6.3 cm) in diameter. The Terra CF
            poles feature a patented FlickLock adjustment. The
            length of the poles can be adjusted by opening and
            closing the FlickLock lever. The Flickock is an
            external camming mechanism located at the bottom of
            the top pole section. The FlickLock mechanism works by
            squeezing the pole shafts together when the lever is
            closed.
            The middle section of the Black Diamond poles is
            black with the Black Diamond logo in silver and is
            marked with centimeter measurements. The centimeter
            measurements on the middle section of the poles range
            from 110 cm (43.3 in) to 140 cm (55 in). All of the
            length adjustment takes place on this section of the
            poles. There is a stop marker before the end of the
            middle section but there is not a stop to prevent the
            poles from pulling apart. The middle section of the
            poles is 14.5 in (36.8 cm) long and 2.25 in (5.7 cm)
            in circumference.
            The lower section of the Terra CF poles are
            silver with the Black Diamond logo printed in black.
            The lower section is 14 in (35.6 cm) long and 2 in (5
            cm) in circumference. The lower section of the pole is
            adjusted using a Binary system. The Binary adjustment
            is activated by pulling out the lower section of the
            pole until it stops and twisting it until the pins pop
            out. The spring pin changes to red when the Binary
            system is engaged. To collapse the poles, the spring
            pins have to be depressed on both sides while the
            lower section of the pole is pushed into the middle
            section. There is a small, black basket at the bottom
            of the pole that looks like it is made from plastic
            and it measures 1.5 in (3.8 cm) in diameter. The tip
            of the pole is 2.5 in (6.6 cm) long with a small
            concave metal tip at the end. There is a tag that
            comes attached to the poles that contains care and use
            instructions and warranty information.
            Initial Impressions:
            I viewed the Black Diamond website before I
            received the Terra CF poles and I found the poles to
            be exactly as they were described on the website when
            I first examined them. Immediately upon arrival, I
            took the Black Diamond Terra CF poles for a test. I
            walked around the neighborhood for awhile to get a
            feel for using the poles. The Black Diamond Terra CF
            poles will be the first pair of my own trekking poles
            that I have used. I have borrowed trekking poles from
            friends a few times and always liked hiking with them.
            I have found that I feel more stable when using
            trekking poles if I am hiking with a pack on. I am
            looking forward to really using the Terra CF poles
            because they will engage and utilize my arm strength
            and hopefully reduce some of the load on my legs. I
            find there is somewhat of an art to using trekking
            poles and even though it seemed awkward when I first
            tried these poles, I felt more comfortable after I
            used them for awhile. I like the design of these
            poles, it is simple, yet seems sturdy and the
            centimeter measurements make for quick and accurate
            length adjustments.
            The Terra CF poles feature two different
            adjustment systems, the FlickLock and a Binary
            adjustment. I have never really used adjustment
            mechanisms like these before. It took me a moment to
            figure out how to use them. These adjustment systems
            are supposed to be simple, easy, and quick to adjust.
            This has not been my experience so far. The FlickLock
            lever is supposed to be pushed over and will "click"
            when it is completely closed. I found the lever on
            both poles to be very stiff and hard to close
            completely. The tag provided with the poles has
            instructions on how to adjust the FlickLock lever.
            This can be done by tightening or loosening a cross
            cut screw on the lever. I have yet to try adjusting
            the FlickLock lever because I would like to see if the
            lever becomes easier to use on its own. I found that
            if the FlickLock lever is not completely closed,
            meaning it hasn't clicked closed, the poles will stay
            extended for awhile and then slowly slip down. The
            Binary adjustment has been even harder for me to use.
            The lower section of the poles is shortened by
            depressing both sides of the spring pins in the binary
            mechanism. I have small hands and have had a really
            hard time squeezing the pins enough to disengage the
            mechanism. I hope that as I use the poles, this will
            become easier to do, because so far it has been
            frustrating. The sliding sections of the poles move
            smoothly but if the poles are extended quickly, there
            is no stop to prevent the middle section from being
            pulled completely out. There is a stop marker on the
            middle pole section but I have still managed to pull
            the pole apart several times. This section is made
            remove able so that it can be cleaned.
            These Black Diamond poles feature a corrective,
            ergonomic handle. I have never seen anything ike the
            "erg knob", this is truly an interesting and unique
            design. After hiking around a little bit and trying
            the top knob, it became apparent why it is shaped the
            way it is. I found it very comfortable to use and it
            has a nice indentation that fits my middle finger
            perfectly. This design offers a lot of stability and I
            think this knob will be great for downhill
            manuevering. The rest of the handle is comfortable and
            the 15º corrective angle seems like it minimizes
            strain on the wrist. I have some concerns about the
            wrist straps on the poles. The straps are a bit
            awkward because they twist and I can't decide the most
            comfortable way to use them.
            I look forward to really trying out the Terra CF
            poles for both day hiking and backpacking. I think
            using these poles will be a great advantage when
            digging in on uphill climbs and for added stability on
            descents, especially when wearing a pack. I am
            interested in the other possible uses for these poles
            besides a trekking aid. I have a history of spraining
            my ankles when hiking and in the past have had to
            hobble home on the injury. These poles could come in
            handy, acting like a cane or crutches if I did happen
            to get injured. These poles could also be used to
            erect an emergency tarp shelter, which is pretty easy
            to do. I hope I will never have to use these poles in
            an emergency situation, but I will feel better having
            them along if something did happen.
            Test Plan:
            I will be testing the Black Diamond Terra CF
            trekking poles in a wide variety of climates and
            situations. I do a fair amount of day hiking,
            averaging about 6 mi (9.7 km) a hike. I day hike often
            and backpack in Big Basin State Park on overnight
            trips several times a year. The terrain in this area
            varies from redwood forest, to chaparral, to riparian
            habitat. The camping and hiking area in the park is
            thick redwood duff. The climate in this area varies
            greatly. Some areas are very dark and damp and it is
            very common for heavy fog to blanket the park in the
            morning and afternoon. Temperatures in Big Basin can
            be in the low 30 F (17 C) and as high as 95 F (35 C).
            The park elevation ranges from sea level to almost
            2,000 ft (610 m). I day hike most often in Henry
            Cowell and Fall Creek State Parks. These areas are
            very similar to Big Basin in terrain and climate.
            I hike and backpack on many overnight trips in
            Castle Rock State Park, which is located at about
            1,800 ft (549 m) on the crest of the Santa Cruz
            Mountains. I backpack in this area frequently
            throughout the year because it is only about forty
            five minutes from where I live, and is a great spur of
            the moment spot. This area is a blend of grasslands,
            lush forest, chaparral, and riparian habitat. The
            hiking trails have a tough sandstone and chaparral
            terrain, with equal amounts of ups and downs along the
            trail.. The climate of Castle Rock is much like that
            of the other state parks located in my area.
            I will be backpacking and car camping on extended
            trips to the Sierra Nevada Mountains over the next few
            months, I will be heading to the Sierras for a week in
            July to hike and camp. Most of the areas that I visit
            and camp in the Sierras are sub alpine and are located
            between 2,000 ft (610 m) and 9,000 ft (2,743 m). Some
            of the areas that I like to backpack in the Sierras
            are near Lake Tahoe and Yosemite Valley, where there
            are endless trails to explore. The climate of the
            Sierras is varying and unpredictable. It may snow at
            any time of the year. Rain is always just around the
            bend and the wind can pick up in an instant. These
            areas feature large masses of exposed granite,
            meadows, rivers and pine forests.
            What I will be testing the Black Diamond Terra CF
            Poles for:
            Durability:
            Do all parts of the poles withstand repeated use
            on hard terrain? If the poles hit on rock, do they
            dent and does the finish chip? Do the tips have to be
            replaced very often? How durable are the foam grips?
            Does the foam deteriorate over time? How durable is
            the strap material? Do the straps fray or rip after
            repeated use?
            Comfort:
            How comfortable are the foam grips? This is
            something that is very important, especially if I need
            to use the poles for extended periods of time. Is it
            comfortable to use the “ergo” top knob? Do I have any
            soreness or areas that rub after using the poles for
            long periods of time? The wrist straps seem awkward
            and I would like to see how much I use them or if they
            tend to just be in the way.
             Performance:
            One of the most important things is how well
            these poles work in various types of terrain. I want
            my gear to perform in many different situations. Do
            they work better on certain terrain than on others?
            Will these poles help reduce the amount of work my
            legs do by utilizing arm strength? How much do they
            help when hiking up and down hill? Is there a lot of
            vibration in the poles when I hike and does it cause
            annoying noise? What other uses can I find for these
            poles?
            Ease of use:
            One of my main concerns is how fast and easy are
            these poles to adjust when I am changing terrain? As I
            mentioned before, I have had some trouble operating
            the FlickLock and Binary mechanisms. I hike often in
            the fall and winter and I want to see if these poles
            can be adjusted easily with gloves on. Are the poles
            easy to use with gloves or if I have sweaty hands? If
            the paint chips or the pole has a ding in it, does it
            affect how smoothly the adjusters work? I have a small
            pack and I am concerned whether these poles will strap
            easily to my pack or if I have to add something to be
            able to strap them to my pack.
             Safety and Stability:
            One of my main concerns when using these poles is
            if they shorten or collapse when a lot of weight is
            applied. I am interested to see how much added
            stability I have when hiking downhill with these
            poles. Many of the areas I hike have loose, rocky
            terrain. As I mentioned before, I do not have a lot of
            experience hiking with trekking poles and I want to
            see how easy it is to get used to hiking with the
            poles or if I find them to be more in the way. The
            baskets on these poles seem on the small side to me
            and I am concerned that they may sink in mud and
            slushy terrain.
            Maintenance:
            I will be testing these poles to see if the
            adjustment mechanisms need to be periodically
            tightened, and if so, how often and how easily can it
            be done. The tag that accompanies the Terra CF poles
            recommends that the poles be checked before and after
            each use to insure that the FlickLock and Binary
            adjustments are working smooth and properly. The
            FlickLock tension can be adjusted by rotating a cross
            cut screw. I am concerned that if I have to make this
            adjustment on the trail, I may not have the
            appropriate tool to do so. It is recommend by the
            company that oil be applied on the lever pin and where
            the FlickLock lever rotates if it becomes hard to open
            or close. I am interested to see if the FlickLock
            adjusters get bound up with dirt and if they do, how
            easy it is to clean them. The middle and lower
            sections of the poles can be removed for cleaning but
            it looks like it would be more difficult to try to
            clean the adjustments mechanisms. Do any of the parts
            have to be replaced after extended use? Replacement
            parts can be obtained from a local Black Diamond
            dealer or directly from Black Diamond. It is
            recommended that the poles be stored dry, with the
            FlickLock tension released.
          • André Corterier
            Tiny nit below. Good to go. Please upload at your convenience to the folder at http://tinyurl.com/9bw4s and thanks for bearing with me. André ...
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 1 3:58 AM
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              Tiny nit below. Good to go. Please
              upload at your convenience to the folder at
              http://tinyurl.com/9bw4s
              and thanks for bearing with me.

              André

              --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, Shandra Hunt
              <jns170@y...> wrote:
              <snip>
              > I hike and backpack on many overnight trips in
              > Castle Rock State Park, which is located at about
              > 1,800 ft (549 m) on the crest of the Santa Cruz
              > Mountains. I backpack in this area frequently
              > throughout the year because it is only about forty
              > five minutes from where I live, and is a great spur of
              > the moment spot. This area is a blend of grasslands,
              > lush forest, chaparral, and riparian habitat. The
              > hiking trails have a tough sandstone and chaparral
              > terrain, with equal amounts of ups and downs along the
              > trail.. The climate of Castle Rock is much like that
              > of the other state parks located in my area.

              The second to last sentence ends with a double period. I assume you
              meant to end with either a single or a triple period. Just pointing
              this out, do with it what you like.

              btw, html looks good, too.

              André
            • Shandra Hunt
              My report is ready to go Andre but I do have a problem. There is not an upload link in the test folder. I am not sure who has to set this up but I ll upload as
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 1 10:54 AM
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                My report is ready to go Andre but I do have a
                problem. There is not an upload link in the test
                folder. I am not sure who has to set this up but I'll
                upload as soon as it is fixed. Shandra

                --- André Corterier <andre.corterier@...>
                wrote:

                > Tiny nit below. Good to go. Please
                > upload at your convenience to the folder at
                > http://tinyurl.com/9bw4s
                > and thanks for bearing with me.
                >
                > André
                >
                > --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, Shandra
                > Hunt
                > <jns170@y...> wrote:
                > <snip>
                > > I hike and backpack on many overnight trips
                > in
                > > Castle Rock State Park, which is located at about
                > > 1,800 ft (549 m) on the crest of the Santa Cruz
                > > Mountains. I backpack in this area frequently
                > > throughout the year because it is only about forty
                > > five minutes from where I live, and is a great
                > spur of
                > > the moment spot. This area is a blend of
                > grasslands,
                > > lush forest, chaparral, and riparian habitat. The
                > > hiking trails have a tough sandstone and chaparral
                > > terrain, with equal amounts of ups and downs along
                > the
                > > trail.. The climate of Castle Rock is much like
                > that
                > > of the other state parks located in my area.
                >
                > The second to last sentence ends with a double
                > period. I assume you
                > meant to end with either a single or a triple
                > period. Just pointing
                > this out, do with it what you like.
                >
                > btw, html looks good, too.
                >
                > André
                >
                >
                >
              • jetriple@rockwellcollins.com
                Fixed -Jet ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Message 7 of 8 , Jul 1 11:03 AM
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                  Fixed

                  -Jet

                  backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com wrote on 07/01/2005 12:54:03 PM:

                  > My report is ready to go Andre but I do have a
                  > problem. There is not an upload link in the test
                  > folder. I am not sure who has to set this up but I'll
                  > upload as soon as it is fixed. Shandra
                  >
                  > --- André Corterier <andre.corterier@...>
                  > wrote:
                  >
                  > > Tiny nit below. Good to go. Please
                  > > upload at your convenience to the folder at
                  > > http://tinyurl.com/9bw4s
                  > > and thanks for bearing with me.
                  > >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • André Corterier
                  Thanks, Jet, for taking care of that so quickly. Shandra, thanks for uploading. The file looks good - which means you re through with the IR process (and can
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jul 1 1:32 PM
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                    Thanks, Jet, for taking care of that so quickly.

                    Shandra, thanks for uploading. The file looks good - which means
                    you're through with the IR process (and can delete the test file). It
                    was a pleasure working with you.

                    André
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