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Application to test - Big Agnes 3 Wire Bivy - Brett Cook

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  • Brett Cook
    I m applying to test the Big Agnes Three Wire Bivy. I have read the BackpackerGearTest.org bylaws ver. 0609 and the Survival Guide. I will follow all
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 1, 2008
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      I'm applying to test the Big Agnes Three Wire Bivy. I have read the
      BackpackerGearTest.org bylaws ver. 0609 and the Survival Guide. I will
      follow all requirements and deadlines. My signed tester agreement is on
      file.



      Personal Information:

      Date: 1 Feb '08

      Age: 47

      Gender: Male

      Height: 5 ft 11 in (1.8 m)

      Weight: 180 lb (82 kg)



      Background:

      I love the outdoors and have backpacking for nearly 30 years. I've pitched
      tarps, shelter halves, 3 and 4 season tents in inclement weather and in some
      very remote areas.

      I've spent my share of cold, wet nights inside inadequate shelters and I
      believe that having suitable shelter from the elements is a key requirement
      to having a safe, enjoyable wilderness experience.

      One item I haven't used is a bivy sack. I like the concept of a small, light
      shelter that could be setup and torn down quickly. This has definite
      advantages on multi-day trips where lots of distance must be covered to
      reach the next campsite.

      I recently spent several days in the Grand Canyon. My pack weight was 32
      lbs, (14.5 kg) which included sleeping gear, clothing, food and 6 l (6.3
      qts) of water each day.
      We hiked 28 mi (45 km) total in 4 days (with one rest day) with afternoon
      temperatures reaching 105 F (40 C). On our longest day, 11 mi (17.7 km), we
      started hiking at 3am to avoid the afternoon heat. Having something small
      and easy to pack up like the Three Wire Bivy could have saved me time in the
      early hours of the morning.

      I am shifting towards lighter gear and one main contributer of the total
      weight is the tent. A shelter under 2lbs (.9 kg) would certainly be a
      benefit.

      I hike several times a month, generally covering 8-10 mi (13-16 km) per day.




      Field Information:

      My love of caving and canyoneering often takes me to remote areas where
      campsites are not developed and tend to be small. Having a bivy sack makes
      the most sense in such situations.

      As many of my camping locations are extremely remote, I need a solid shelter
      that I can count on, so material choice and quality of workmanship is
      important to me.

      Single wall shelters are very light, but can suffer from condensation. One
      of my concerns would whether my sleeping bag would stay dry in cold
      conditions. The Big Agnes bivy is made with eVENT fabric, which is
      advertised as breathable and waterproof. These competing requirements are
      difficult to achieve.

      The 3 Wire bivy includes a layer of mesh bug netting that would be handy for
      keeping the insects at bay when the temperatures are warm and extra
      ventilation is needed.



      Test Locations:

      In February, I will be camping on a remote, windy plateau in the Guadalupe
      Mountains of New Mexico at an elevation of about 5000 ft (1500 m). Weather
      there is typically cold and windy and may include rain, sleet and snow.
      These conditions should test the waterproof/breathable claims.

      In the spring, I plan to backpack into the Gila Wilderness at elevations
      over 9000 ft (2700 m) where there's a chance of snow and wet, stormy
      conditions.

      I also have a couple of trips planned that will take me through canyons
      where camp sites are difficult to find. The bivys small footprint would be a
      real benefit.



      Test Plan:

      If selected, I will begin testing by familiarizing myself with the bivy sack
      and practice setting it up in my backyard.

      Next, I will spend a weekend in the Guadalupe Mountains to see how it
      performs with cold weather. If the weather is clear and cold, ventilation
      will be necessary to reduce or prevent condensation. I will also get a
      chance to see how well the low profile works with the strong winds common in
      the southwest.

      The stakes will also get tested as the high winds possible in the "Guads"
      have uprooted tents in the past.



      Test Goals:

      The results of the testing should answer the following questions.

      1. Does the visor offer enough coverage so that the bivy can be opened
      somewhat for ventilation during rain?

      2. Is the bivy sack large enough to stow some of my gear at the foot
      (such as clothing or possibly my empty pack)?

      3. Will the eVENT material pass enough water vapor through to prevent
      condensation from building up to the point where my sleeping bag gets
      soaked?

      4. Is the eVENT fabric sufficiently waterproof to stand up to a hard
      rain on its own, or is a poncho or tarp necessary?

      5. Does the fabric contact the sleeping bag at any point which could
      cause moisture to condense directly on the bag and increase convective heat
      transfer?

      6. Will the sack feel cramped?



      The above testing will also show off several aspects of the Three Wire Bivy
      Sacks design: overall strength (when properly pitched), seam placement, ease
      of setup and tear-down, quality of workmanship, water resistance, ability to
      keep rain out during entry/exit, durability of zippers.



      Link to completed reviews:

      <http://www.backpackgeartest.org/tester_reviews/ropewalker>
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/tester_reviews/ropewalker



      Other tests in progress:

      La Sportiva Halite GTX boots - field report complete, long term report due
      18 march 2008.



      I am a newbie, but the newbie rule does not apply to the boots. Also, boot
      testing can occur concurrently with tent testing and won't prevent me from
      filing reports on time.



      Brett Cook



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Brett Cook
      I found an error that slipped by and fixed it (replaced convective with conductive ). ... From: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 2, 2008
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        I found an error that slipped by and fixed it (replaced "convective" with
        "conductive").

        -----Original Message-----
        From: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brett Cook
        Sent: Friday, February 01, 2008 11:16 PM
        To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [backpackgeartesters] Application to test - Big Agnes 3 Wire Bivy -
        Brett Cook

        I'm applying to test the Big Agnes Three Wire Bivy. I have read the
        BackpackerGearTest.org bylaws ver. 0609 and the Survival Guide. I will
        follow all requirements and deadlines. My signed tester agreement is on
        file.



        Personal Information:

        Date: 1 Feb '08

        Age: 47

        Gender: Male

        Height: 5 ft 11 in (1.8 m)

        Weight: 180 lb (82 kg)



        Background:

        I love the outdoors and have backpacking for nearly 30 years. I've pitched
        tarps, shelter halves, 3 and 4 season tents in inclement weather and in some
        very remote areas.

        I've spent my share of cold, wet nights inside inadequate shelters and I
        believe that having suitable shelter from the elements is a key requirement
        to having a safe, enjoyable wilderness experience.

        One item I haven't used is a bivy sack. I like the concept of a small, light
        shelter that could be setup and torn down quickly. This has definite
        advantages on multi-day trips where lots of distance must be covered to
        reach the next campsite.

        I recently spent several days in the Grand Canyon. My pack weight was 32
        lbs, (14.5 kg) which included sleeping gear, clothing, food and 6 l (6.3
        qts) of water each day.
        We hiked 28 mi (45 km) total in 4 days (with one rest day) with afternoon
        temperatures reaching 105 F (40 C). On our longest day, 11 mi (17.7 km), we
        started hiking at 3am to avoid the afternoon heat. Having something small
        and easy to pack up like the Three Wire Bivy could have saved me time in the
        early hours of the morning.

        I am shifting towards lighter gear and one main contributer of the total
        weight is the tent. A shelter under 2lbs (.9 kg) would certainly be a
        benefit.

        I hike several times a month, generally covering 8-10 mi (13-16 km) per day.




        Field Information:

        My love of caving and canyoneering often takes me to remote areas where
        campsites are not developed and tend to be small. Having a bivy sack makes
        the most sense in such situations.

        As many of my camping locations are extremely remote, I need a solid shelter
        that I can count on, so material choice and quality of workmanship is
        important to me.

        Single wall shelters are very light, but can suffer from condensation. One
        of my concerns would whether my sleeping bag would stay dry in cold
        conditions. The Big Agnes bivy is made with eVENT fabric, which is
        advertised as breathable and waterproof. These competing requirements are
        difficult to achieve.

        The 3 Wire bivy includes a layer of mesh bug netting that would be handy for
        keeping the insects at bay when the temperatures are warm and extra
        ventilation is needed.



        Test Locations:

        In February, I will be camping on a remote, windy plateau in the Guadalupe
        Mountains of New Mexico at an elevation of about 5000 ft (1500 m). Weather
        there is typically cold and windy and may include rain, sleet and snow.
        These conditions should test the waterproof/breathable claims.

        In the spring, I plan to backpack into the Gila Wilderness at elevations
        over 9000 ft (2700 m) where there's a chance of snow and wet, stormy
        conditions.

        I also have a couple of trips planned that will take me through canyons
        where camp sites are difficult to find. The bivys small footprint would be a
        real benefit.



        Test Plan:

        If selected, I will begin testing by familiarizing myself with the bivy sack
        and practice setting it up in my backyard.

        Next, I will spend a weekend in the Guadalupe Mountains to see how it
        performs with cold weather. If the weather is clear and cold, ventilation
        will be necessary to reduce or prevent condensation. I will also get a
        chance to see how well the low profile works with the strong winds common in
        the southwest.

        The stakes will also get tested as the high winds possible in the "Guads"
        have uprooted tents in the past.



        Test Goals:

        The results of the testing should answer the following questions.

        1. Does the visor offer enough coverage so that the bivy can be opened
        somewhat for ventilation during rain?

        2. Is the bivy sack large enough to stow some of my gear at the foot
        (such as clothing or possibly my empty pack)?

        3. Will the eVENT material pass enough water vapor through to prevent
        condensation from building up to the point where my sleeping bag gets
        soaked?

        4. Is the eVENT fabric sufficiently waterproof to stand up to a hard
        rain on its own, or is a poncho or tarp necessary?

        5. Does the fabric contact the sleeping bag at any point which could
        cause moisture to condense directly on the bag and increase conductive heat
        transfer?

        6. Will the sack feel cramped?



        The above testing will also show off several aspects of the Three Wire Bivy
        Sacks design: overall strength (when properly pitched), seam placement, ease
        of setup and tear-down, quality of workmanship, water resistance, ability to
        keep rain out during entry/exit, durability of zippers.



        Link to completed reviews:

        <http://www.backpackgeartest.org/tester_reviews/ropewalker>
        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/tester_reviews/ropewalker



        Other tests in progress:

        La Sportiva Halite GTX boots - field report complete, long term report due
        18 march 2008.



        I am a newbie, but the newbie rule does not apply to the boots. Also, boot
        testing can occur concurrently with tent testing and won't prevent me from
        filing reports on time.



        Brett Cook



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • Coy
        ... wrote: . Also, boot ... from ... gona wear the boots in the bivy?...: ) Coy Boy
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 2, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Brett Cook" <brett@...>
          wrote:
          . Also, boot
          > testing can occur concurrently with tent testing and won't prevent me
          from
          > filing reports on time.

          gona wear the boots in the bivy?...:')

          Coy Boy
        • Brett Cook
          That s a test I didn t consider. :-) I just figured I could use the boots to get me to a campsite where I could set up the bivy. Brett ... From:
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 2, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            That's a test I didn't consider. :-)
            I just figured I could use the boots to get me to a campsite where I could
            set up the bivy.

            Brett

            -----Original Message-----
            From: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Coy
            Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2008 9:14 PM
            To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [backpackgeartesters] Re: Revised Application to test - Big Agnes 3
            Wire Bivy - Brett Cook

            --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Brett Cook" <brett@...>
            wrote:
            . Also, boot
            > testing can occur concurrently with tent testing and won't prevent me
            from
            > filing reports on time.

            gona wear the boots in the bivy?...:')

            Coy Boy





            Yahoo! Groups Links
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