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POST: Outdoor Research PL 400 Gloves Field Report - André

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  • André Corterier
    ... Full html version here: http://tinyurl.com/2d98hc Text version (FR section only) below: Field Report Field Experience: The gloves have accompanied me daily
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 2, 2008
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      > POST: Outdoor Research PL 400 Gloves Field Report - André

      Full html version here: http://tinyurl.com/2d98hc
      Text version (FR section only) below:

      Field Report
      Field Experience:
      The gloves have accompanied me daily during the test period. They
      resided in the handwarmer pockets of my softshell jacket well into
      December, and now sit in the pockets of my insulated hardshell
      jacket. Temperatures have varied a great deal, though I've usually
      worn the gloves only when temperatures dipped into the teens or below
      (Centigrade - that would be below 50 F). The lowest temperatures in
      which I've been out while wearing these gloves so far has been a
      thermometer-checked -5 C (23 F). I've worn them in strong wind and no
      wind at all and have been out in strong and light rain. Activities
      were backpacking, strolling along, jogging and bicycling.

      I've had them on only three overnight trips, but have not worn them
      inside my sleeping bag (it wasn't cold enough).

      Specific Questions I Wanted to Answer and my Answers so far:
      Do they provide some/enough insulation by themselves for use whenever
      it isn't terribly cold? (Not that I'm likely to be able to test in
      terrible cold)
      I've found them well suited for moderately active pursuits (i.e.,
      backpacking) in temperatures down to -5 C (23 F). The heat generated
      by my body was enough in that situation that my hands stayed warm. If
      I was only strolling or not moving at all, my hands begun to feel
      cold whenever the temperatures were below freezing. They still kept
      my hands usable, but no longer inside my comfort range.
      Do they resist rain (or at least fog or drizzle) for a while?
      Fog or drizzle was not a problem. The gloves did not appear to pick
      up a noticeable amount of moisture. Rain was different - while it
      took a little while for the gloves to soak through, they did soak
      through and then provided much less in the way of insulation. No
      surprise there, really. I found this most noticeable when bicycling -
      when backpacking, most rain drips off my sleeves and bypasses my
      hands, so the gloves did not get quite soaked (it may also have been
      raining less hard.
      If they get soaked, do they dry quickly? How warm will they be when
      wet?
      Well, they dried during an afternoon left inside. They were soaked by
      noon when I came home, and dry by evening when I checked on them. As
      mentioned earlier, they were warmer when wet than wearing no gloves
      at all, but significantly less warm than when dry.
      Do they fit closely enough that I can wear them underneath my other
      gloves as glove liners (as their name would seem to imply), or do I
      need gloves one size larger to accomplish this?
      I don't possess any gloves that I could feasibly wear over these - I
      tried. I may go out and see if I can find some large mittens of the
      shell type that might do, but these gloves won't fit underneath any
      other gloves.
      Is the fabric woven tightly enough to provide some wind protection?
      Yes. It is a double layer glove, so there are two layers of fleece in
      the way of the wind. I can feel strong wind through the gloves, but
      am not negatively impacted by anything less.
      Is their surface area tough enough not to quickly dissolve when
      handling rough items sometimes, and how slippery is it (big deal when
      going up really steep slopes)?
      So far I can see now indications of wear on the gloves - neither on
      the fleece fabric of the gloves proper, nor on the silicone grips.
      The silicone strips do provide greater traction than the fleece
      fabric by itself would. In fact, I've found fleece to be very
      slippery indeed and have needed to grab smooth surfaces wih a lot of
      strength in order to attain a moderately secure hold. The silicone
      lines on the fingers and inside the palm substantially reduce the
      amount of force required. They fall short of the sort of sure grip
      rubber gloves give me on, say, wet dishes. I believe I've noticed the
      grip decrease a little in temperatures below freezing, but would not
      know how to test this.
      Also, as they'll likely be replacing my current gloves in most
      situations, how do they deal with jogging/bicycling, etc.?
      They work quite well for such pursuits. While not-quite-windproof
      means that my hands inevitable get a little chilled when I ride my
      bicycle to work in the mornings (temps around freezing, air speed
      around 30+ kmh - 20 mph), this isn't much of a bother (and I know
      from past experience that doing the same without gloves is painful).
      When jogging in temperatures just above freezing, with little wind
      chill (I'm a slow jogger), they seemed overkill. They were rather
      sweaty after a half hour or so and I felt tempted to take them off
      after a mere five minutes.


      I'll be appending my long term experience with the gloves to this
      report in two months or so.
    • Heather
      Andre, Here is your edit, looks pretty good. The html is good, and I only have a couple things for you. `heather ... (Centigrade - that would be below 50 F).
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 8, 2008
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        Andre,

        Here is your edit, looks pretty good. The html is good, and I only have
        a couple things for you.

        `heather

        > though I've usually
        > worn the gloves only when temperatures dipped into the teens or below
        (Centigrade - that would be below 50 F).

        EDIT: do you mean C or F for the teens? I'm guessing C from the other
        info, but please humour (tee hee) a non-metric person...

        >While not-quite-windproof means that my hands inevitable get a little
        >chilled when I ride my bicycle to work in the mornings

        EDIT: I think you mean 'inevitably' instead
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