Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

FR - Mountain About GatrGuard - Wayne

Expand Messages
  • Wayne Merry
    For your editing pleasure Regards, Wayne Field Test Report: 2 Dec 2007 Trips during Field Test period: Brisbane Ranges: 3 days on track. Elevations ranged from
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 2, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      For your editing pleasure
      Regards,
      Wayne


      Field Test Report:

      2 Dec 2007


      Trips during Field Test period:

      Brisbane Ranges: 3 days on track. Elevations ranged from 100 m (330 ft)
      to 400 m (1330 ft), with temperatures from 10 C (50 F) to 30 C (86 F).
      There was some overnight rain, but none while walking. The terrain
      included a significant amount of shale rock.

      South West Tasmania: 16 days on and off track. Elevations ranged from
      sea level to 1100 m (3630 ft), with temperatures from 5 C (41 F) to 25 C
      (77 F). Most days were dry, but I walked through some rain including a
      storm. Humidity was medium to high. Terrain included lots of mud, which
      at times was more than 1 m (3.3 ft) deep. On track conditions included a
      significant amount of rocks and stones.


      My experience with the GatrGuard:

      My first two months with the MountainAbout GatrGuard included two trips
      (detailed above) which were not the easiest walking conditions for
      gaiter straps. The first trip included almost constant walking on shale
      rock, which made me wonder just how long the GatrGuards were going to
      last. Both straps showed very little wear at the conclusion of the trip.
      At this stage I was very positive about the GatrGuards, as they were
      outperforming the metal cables that I had used in the past.


      My second trip was in South West Tasmania, and this area is well known
      for being quite muddy. My first few days were on the Port Davey track,
      which was the most muddy section of the trip. The track is quite
      overgrown which means that the mud is at times unavoidable, and on quite
      a number of occasions, I was in thigh deep mud. It was in these
      conditions that the GatrGuards began to struggle. The straps are held in
      place by shock cord with a clamp. This binding, which gave me no
      problems in the Brisbane Ranges failed in Tasmania. One strap came off
      on the first day, and even though I would check the shock cords on an
      hourly basis, the second strap failed on the 7th day. I lost one strap.
      As the straps failed, I began to use the straps that came with my
      gaiters, which are secured using a buckle, and this mechanism survived
      the trip, although those straps gained quite a bit of wear.

      The conditions that we experienced in Tasmania were hard on our
      equipment – everyone in our walking party experienced breakages in
      shoelaces. My boots didn't fall apart, but they were not anywhere near
      as good as when the trip started. The conditions were harder on
      equipment than the last time I was in SW Tassie.

      Even though the conditions in SW Tassie were harder on equipment than
      all of my other walking, I do think that the GatrGuard needs a more
      secure method of attachment. A climbing friend has suggested using
      static cord, and I intend to do this for the long term review of this
      test series. I also think that the shock cord attachment would survive
      most, but not all of my usual walking. As for the straps themselves,
      they survived conditions that would have seen the end of other straps I
      have used. The picture above shows a strap after 10 days of use, and
      even though I need new cords, the strap itself shows very little sign of
      wear, and I would imagine it would still be good after another 10 days
      of the same conditions.
    • becki_s19
      EDIT: FR - Mountain About GatrGuard - Wayne Wayne- just one edit.... ... Edit: it looks like somehow a glitch got in.... I m wondering if you tried to use
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 3, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        EDIT: FR - Mountain About GatrGuard - Wayne

        Wayne- just one edit....


        > The conditions that we experienced in Tasmania were hard on our
        > equipment â€" everyone in our walking party experienced breakages in
        Edit: it looks like somehow a glitch got in.... I'm wondering if you
        tried to use "&" and it threw the program off. If so, just
        substitute "and" and you're ready to upload.

        Becky S
      • Andrew Priest
        Hi Wayne Thanks for your field report which is interesting. I have a couple of modifications for you to make please. I would like the sentence I have quoted
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 3, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Wayne

          Thanks for your field report which is interesting. I have a couple of
          modifications for you to make please. I would like the sentence I have
          quoted below removed. We focus on reporting what we experience not what we
          think may happen. The balance of the paragraph is fine.

          I would also like to see in your report more details on the breakage or wear
          to the guards if you can.

          In respect to the modifications, you need to run these past your Test
          Moderator if not already done so. We normally test the gear as supplied
          unless there is a risk involved. Please refer to the Survival Guide for more
          guidance on this topic.

          Thanks
          Andrew Priest


          -----Original Message-----
          From: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Wayne Merry
          Sent: Monday, December 03, 2007 12:51 PM
          To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com; becki_s19@...
          Subject: [backpackgeartesters] FR - Mountain About GatrGuard - Wayne

          For your editing pleasure
          Regards,
          Wayne


          I also think that the shock cord attachment would survive most, but not all
          of my usual walking.
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.