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FR Danner GTX Boots Jenn K.

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  • Jenn K.
    Ted Here is my FR for the Danner GTX boots. The HTML can be found here: http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/FR%20Danner%20GTX%
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 29, 2007
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      Ted

      Here is my FR for the Danner GTX boots.

      The HTML can be found here:
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/FR%20Danner%20GTX%
      20Boots%20Jenn%20K/

      or here:
      http://tinyurl.com/2h8azz


      Testing Locations

      Whiting Ranch Regional Park, Southern California: This was my break
      in trip for the boots. I hiked 5.5 mi (9 km). The high temperature
      was 85 F (29 C). The trail was mostly packed dirt with some rocks.
      There was approximately 1,200 ft (366 m) of elevation gain and loss.

      Day hikes Wasatch Mountain Range in Utah: Multiple locations. The
      trail conditions varied during the day hikes. On some occasions
      there was mud, traces of snow, rock scrambling, stream crossings,
      wet leaves, and dry trail.

      Two day backpacking trip in the Uinta Mountain Range in Utah:
      Starting elevation was around 9,700 ft. The temperatures during this
      trip were in the low 70's (21 C) during the day and around 45 F (7
      C) at night. The weather was partly sunny with some rain showers.

      American Fork Canyon in Utah in the Wasatch Mountain Range: The
      starting elevation was 6,910 ft (2,106 m) for this trip. The
      temperatures were in the mid 80's F (27 C) with sunny skies.

      American Fork Canyon in Utah in the Wasatch Mountain Range: This was
      an overnight trip the day after a snow storm. Starting elevation of
      6,800 ft (2,073 m) up to about 8,400 ft (2,560 m) with temperatures
      37 F (3 C) in the day and just below 32 F (0 C) at night. The
      terrain was snow covered dirt and rock. There was approximately 3 to
      4 in (8 to 10 cm) of snow on the ground.

      Hawaii (Big Island): Day hikes on the west and east side of the
      island. Daytime temperatures were in the low to mid 80's (27 C) with
      rainy and dry conditions.

      Performance in the Field

      During the field testing phase I primarily wore a light backpacking
      sock with the boots. The socks that I wear are a mid height. On one
      occasion I did wear a heavier sock because I was hiking a long
      distance.

      These boots are very comfortable on uphill approaches and flat
      terrain. However, I am finding some mild discomfort on downhill
      approaches just below the medial and lateral aspect of the
      malleolus. Specifically I am experiencing some rubbing on the
      peroneal and flexor retinaculum. I am not experiencing any tarsal
      compression just a rubbing sensation. During the testing period I
      attempted to diminish this discomfort by modifying the way the boots
      are tied. I experimented with a surgeon knot and segmented lock
      lacing which did help minimally. There were no blisters in this area
      of my foot just some discomfort while descending slopes and trails.

      The laces are very long for my liking. I have compensated by using a
      ladder lacing technique. However, when I tie the boots with a ladder
      lacing method I can not tighten them enough to help with the rubbing
      I experience. The D-rings of the boots do not seem to hold the
      tension of the lace very well. I need to modify the tightness of the
      laces many times while on the trail. The laces seem to creep loose.

      The waterproofness of the nubuck is stellar. Water just beads right
      off. No water has seeped through the seams on the nubuck during this
      testing period. Water beads off the fabric with light contact with
      water, such as light precipitation or a quick stream crossing.
      However, in a soaking rain the fabric does hold water. There has not
      been any experience yet of the water completely seeping through the
      fabric. Some dirt has entered into the boots, but it is minimal.
      This will need to be further assessed in my field report to
      determine if the dirt is entering from the top of the boot or
      through the fabric.

      The protective toe caps protect my feet in an excellent manner. I
      tend to bump my toes frequently on the trail and trip over debris.
      With these boots I did not notice any impact or pain on my toes when
      bumping or tripping over objects. There are no signs of wear or
      scuffing on the toe cap. This may be due to the rough texture of the
      rubber. After a day of hiking there is still room in the toe box for
      my slightly swollen feet and toes.

      I can say that the footbed is very comfortable. I am quite surprised
      that included footbed is so comfortable. Usually I have to replace
      the footbed in my boots and shoes with an aftermarket type to
      decrease pain and discomfort. I have noticed that the footbed does
      become moist while hiking from perspiration. It has not become wet
      and there is no odor to speak of. My feet have been free of arch
      pain and discomfort while wearing these boots. I feel as though my
      feet are well supported in these boots. I have not experienced an
      ankle rolling during the test period.

      Another excellent feature of these boots is the traction. They
      perform very well on descents. Even in thick mud. I will admit that
      I did slide some but not at all like I have in the past with other
      shoes. These boots definitely increased my foot placement
      confidence. They also perform well in light snow and wet rocks. I
      had a loss of traction on a few tree roots but they were wet and
      very slick. The good news is that I did not fall down like my hiking
      partner did. It seems as though the aggressive traction on these
      boots work very well on wet and dry surfaces.

      By using a cloth and some water I was able to clean the boots to
      remove dirt and mud on the fabric and the nubuck. Trapped mud on the
      bottom of the boots is also easily washed away. There has not been
      any rusting of the lacing hardware or frays in the stitching.

      The boots do feel a little bit on the heavy side. But, I believe
      that can be expected from a rugged hiking boot. I got so used to
      wearing trail runners earlier this year that I forgot what it was
      like to wear a real pair of boots.

      Things I Like:

      The traction on wet and dry surfaces

      The comfort on flat terrain and uphill assents

      The waterproofness

      The toecap



      Things I Do Not Like:

      The foot discomfort I feel on descents

      The laces are very long



      Remarks

      This concludes my Field Report. Thank you Danner and
      backpackgeartest.org for providing me with the opportunity to test
      the 453 GTX boots. My long term report will be posted in early
      January. Please check back then to see how these boots are
      performing in the field. The boots will be used in the desert and
      northern mountain regions during the final phase of testing. The
      boots will be exposed to snow, rain, and warmer temperatures.
    • edwardripleyduggan
      Hi Jenn, I m stuck in NYC, working, for about a week. Sorry for the delay. I haven t even been able to hike Central Park yet! Ted. ... ### COMMENT: were (?)
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 2, 2007
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        Hi Jenn,

        I'm stuck in NYC, working, for about a week. Sorry for the delay. I
        haven't even been able to hike Central Park yet!

        Ted.

        Your edit follows:


        >
        > Testing Locations
        >
        > Whiting Ranch Regional Park, Southern California: This was my break
        > in trip for the boots. I hiked 5.5 mi (9 km). The high temperature
        > was 85 F (29 C). The trail was mostly packed dirt with some rocks.
        > There was

        ### COMMENT: were (?) It's "gain and loss" so I think the verb
        declines in the plural. One could argue the point. I don't really care
        as it makes sense anyhow!

        approximately 1,200 ft (366 m) of elevation gain and loss.

        >
        > American Fork Canyon in Utah in the Wasatch Mountain Range: The
        > starting elevation was 6,910 ft (2,106 m) for this trip. The
        > temperatures were in the mid 80's

        ### EDIT: 80s [no apostrophe needed]

        F (27 C) with sunny skies.


        > Performance in the Field
        >
        > During the field testing phase I primarily wore a light backpacking
        > sock with the boots. The socks that I wear are a mid height.

        ### EDIT: mid-height

        On one
        > occasion I did wear a heavier sock because I was hiking a long
        > distance.
        >
        > These boots are very comfortable on uphill approaches and flat
        > terrain. However, I am finding some mild discomfort on downhill
        > approaches just below the medial and lateral aspect of the
        > malleolus. Specifically I am experiencing some rubbing on the
        > peroneal and flexor retinaculum.

        ### COMMENT: Jeez! Is it catching? Seriously, I do wonder how many
        folks know the parts of their tootsies that well.

        I am not experiencing any tarsal
        > compression just a rubbing sensation. During the testing period I
        > attempted to diminish this discomfort by modifying the way the boots
        > are tied. I experimented with a surgeon knot and segmented lock
        > lacing which did help minimally. There were no blisters in this area
        > of my foot just some discomfort while descending slopes and trails.

        ### COMMENT: Aah. A lacing maven. Good.

        >
        > The laces are very long for my liking. I have compensated by using a
        > ladder lacing technique. However, when I tie the boots with a ladder
        > lacing method I can not tighten them enough to help with the rubbing
        > I experience. The D-rings of the boots do not seem to hold the
        > tension of the lace very well. I need to modify the tightness of the
        > laces many times while on the trail. The laces seem to creep loose.

        ### COMMENT: I take it that this is worse than the usual nylon lace
        stretch issue?

        >
        > The waterproofness of the nubuck is stellar. Water just beads right
        > off. No water has seeped through the seams on the nubuck during this
        > testing period. Water beads off the fabric with light contact with
        > water, such as light precipitation or a quick stream crossing.
        > However, in a soaking rain the fabric does hold water. There has not
        > been any experience yet of the water completely seeping through the
        > fabric. Some dirt has entered into the boots, but it is minimal.
        > This will need to be further assessed in my field report

        ### EDIT: long-term report [this IS the field report, right?]

        to
        > determine if the dirt is entering from the top of the boot or
        > through the fabric.

        >
        > I can say that the footbed is very comfortable. I am quite surprised
        > that

        ### EDIT: the [and the sentence is slightly redundant]

        included footbed is so comfortable. Usually I have to replace
        > the footbed in my boots and shoes with an aftermarket type to
        > decrease pain and discomfort. I have noticed that the footbed does
        > become moist while hiking from perspiration. It has not become wet
        > and there is no odor to speak of. My feet have been free of arch
        > pain and discomfort while wearing these boots. I feel as though my
        > feet are well supported in these boots. I have not experienced an
        > ankle rolling during the test period.
        >
        > Another excellent feature of these boots is the traction. They
        > perform very well on descents. Even in thick mud. I will admit that
        > I did slide some but not at all like I have in the past with other
        > shoes. These boots definitely increased my foot placement
        > confidence. They also perform well in light snow and wet rocks. I
        > had a loss of traction on a few tree roots but they were wet and
        > very slick. The good news is that I did not fall down like my hiking
        > partner did.

        ### COMMENT: Snort and giggle!!!!! <g>

        It seems as though the aggressive traction on these
        > boots work very well on wet and dry surfaces.
        >
        >
      • Jenn K.
        Ted Thanks for the edits. It will be uploaded soon. Be careful in central park. I never went there at night but then again I am a woman. ... Well I am a
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 2, 2007
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          Ted

          Thanks for the edits. It will be uploaded soon. Be careful in
          central park. I never went there at night but then again I am a
          woman.

          --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "edwardripleyduggan"
          <erd@...> wrote:
          >

          > > These boots are very comfortable on uphill approaches and flat
          > > terrain. However, I am finding some mild discomfort on downhill
          > > approaches just below the medial and lateral aspect of the
          > > malleolus. Specifically I am experiencing some rubbing on the
          > > peroneal and flexor retinaculum.
          >
          > ### COMMENT: Jeez! Is it catching? Seriously, I do wonder how many
          > folks know the parts of their tootsies that well.

          Well I am a therapist. Lucky for me the past week I have been
          discussing such nifty things with my colleagues at a conference in
          Orlando. They read my report and I am the top of the class here with
          that comment.
          >

          > > The laces are very long for my liking. I have compensated by
          using a
          > > ladder lacing technique. However, when I tie the boots with a
          ladder
          > > lacing method I can not tighten them enough to help with the
          rubbing
          > > I experience. The D-rings of the boots do not seem to hold the
          > > tension of the lace very well. I need to modify the tightness of
          >the
          > > laces many times while on the trail. The laces seem to creep
          loose.
          >
          > ### COMMENT: I take it that this is worse than the usual nylon lace
          > stretch issue?

          Definitely.


          > > Another excellent feature of these boots is the traction. They
          > > perform very well on descents. Even in thick mud. I will admit
          that
          > > I did slide some but not at all like I have in the past with
          other
          > > shoes. These boots definitely increased my foot placement
          > > confidence. They also perform well in light snow and wet rocks.
          I
          > > had a loss of traction on a few tree roots but they were wet and
          > > very slick. The good news is that I did not fall down like my
          >hiking
          > > partner did.
          >
          > ### COMMENT: Snort and giggle!!!!! <g>
          >

          I chuckled myself. For the record it was not Ray.

          Jenn
        • edwardripleyduggan
          The woman whose apartment I m borrowing (while she s in Spain) often runs there. Strikes me NY is much safer than it used to be. I m not a big city person
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 4, 2007
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            The woman whose apartment I'm borrowing (while she's in Spain) often
            runs there. Strikes me NY is much safer than it used to be. I'm not a
            big city person (country born and raised, admittedly the "Old
            Country") but I quite enjoy NY.

            --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Jenn K." <jennksnowy@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Ted
            >
            > Thanks for the edits. It will be uploaded soon. Be careful in
            > central park. I never went there at night but then again I am a
            > woman.
            >
            > --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "edwardripleyduggan"
            > <erd@> wrote:
            > >
            >
            > > > These boots are very comfortable on uphill approaches and flat
            > > > terrain. However, I am finding some mild discomfort on downhill
            > > > approaches just below the medial and lateral aspect of the
            > > > malleolus. Specifically I am experiencing some rubbing on the
            > > > peroneal and flexor retinaculum.
            > >
            > > ### COMMENT: Jeez! Is it catching? Seriously, I do wonder how many
            > > folks know the parts of their tootsies that well.
            >
            > Well I am a therapist. Lucky for me the past week I have been
            > discussing such nifty things with my colleagues at a conference in
            > Orlando. They read my report and I am the top of the class here with
            > that comment.
            > >
            >
            > > > The laces are very long for my liking. I have compensated by
            > using a
            > > > ladder lacing technique. However, when I tie the boots with a
            > ladder
            > > > lacing method I can not tighten them enough to help with the
            > rubbing
            > > > I experience. The D-rings of the boots do not seem to hold the
            > > > tension of the lace very well. I need to modify the tightness of
            > >the
            > > > laces many times while on the trail. The laces seem to creep
            > loose.
            > >
            > > ### COMMENT: I take it that this is worse than the usual nylon lace
            > > stretch issue?
            >
            > Definitely.
            >
            >
            > > > Another excellent feature of these boots is the traction. They
            > > > perform very well on descents. Even in thick mud. I will admit
            > that
            > > > I did slide some but not at all like I have in the past with
            > other
            > > > shoes. These boots definitely increased my foot placement
            > > > confidence. They also perform well in light snow and wet rocks.
            > I
            > > > had a loss of traction on a few tree roots but they were wet and
            > > > very slick. The good news is that I did not fall down like my
            > >hiking
            > > > partner did.
            > >
            > > ### COMMENT: Snort and giggle!!!!! <g>
            > >
            >
            > I chuckled myself. For the record it was not Ray.
            >
            > Jenn
            >
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