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APPLICATION: Patagonia Vagabond - Mike Curry

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  • Mike C.
    I am pleased to submit the following application to test Patagonia Vagabond shoes. I have read the requirements found in Chapter 5 of the BGT Survival Guide,
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 3 10:42 AM
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      I am pleased to submit the following application to test Patagonia
      Vagabond shoes. I have read the requirements found in Chapter 5 of
      the BGT Survival Guide, v. 0609, and will comply with these
      requirements.

      PERSONAL BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION:

      Name: Michael Curry
      Age: 37
      Gender: Male
      Height: 5'11" (1.8 m.)
      Weight: 205 lbs. (93 kg.)
      Email address: thefishguy@...
      Residence: Aberdeen, Washington, USA
      Additional Information: US Size 11.5, Color preference: #1
      Black/Grey, #2 Dark Brown/Taupe

      Note on sizing: I was unable to find a pair of Patagonia shoes
      nearby that I could try on, but always have worn an 11 or 11.5 in
      shoes and boots. If selected, the socks I will wear with the shoes
      will depend on whether they run big or small.

      My research shows that in 1996, Wolverine acquired the global
      license to design and manufacture Patagonia footwear (see
      http://www.wolverineworldwide.com/main_history.asp). Wolverine also
      produces Hush Puppies and Merrell footwear (among others) and I have
      owned several pairs of each and have always worn an 11.5 in both.

      To be honest, I'm a person that has always had a hard time finding
      footwear I find comfortable. I don't know if my feet are just
      shaped differently than everyone else's, or if I'm overly-sensitive
      in the feet, but it's hard for me to find shoes I find comfortable
      for more than a few weeks. Usually problems occur for me because
      the toe box is too cramped or the heel area is too wide.

      Backpacking background:

      I've been backpacking, climbing, ski-packing, bushwhacking, and
      snowshoeing throughout Oregon and Washington for the last 25 years.
      I'm an all-season, all terrain, off-trail kind of guy, but these
      days (having small kids) most of my trips run on the shorter, saner
      side of things, and tend to be in the temperate rainforest. While
      I've carried packs in excess of 70 pounds (32 kilos), the older I
      get the more minimalist I become, and now tend toward ultralight
      tarp camping in most cases.

      FIELD INFORMATION:

      If selected, I will test these shoes on all my backpacking trips and
      day hikes during the test period. I have several overnight,
      weekend, and multi-day trips planned during the test period, and day-
      hike with my family almost every weekend. In addition, come October
      I will begin my fishing trips, which involve both day and overnight
      trips about 3 times a month.

      In addition to my usual haunts in the Olympic Mountains of
      Washington, one trip the last week of this month is an 8 day
      combination of car-camping, backpacking, and day hiking with my
      family around Newberry Crater and the lavalands of Oregon.

      Trips will involve camps from 4,800 ft (1463 m) to sea level, and
      will range from good trail to off-trail scrambles in temperate
      forest and subalpine areas. Anticipated weather would include high
      temperatures ranging from 50-90 F (10-32 C) and overnight lows
      ranging from 25-60 F (-4-16 C), with some dry days and lots of rainy
      ones. My trips during this time will be a mix of lightweight tarp
      camping and mid-weight trips.

      Terrain will include a variety of surfaces including good rock
      trail, mud, talus, dirt, mud, possibly some snow-covered trails, off-
      trail rock and dirt, mud, and on my 8 day trip to central Oregon the
      soles will be put to the ultimate abrasion test on pumice and
      obsidian. Oh, did I mention mud???

      In addition, these are shoes that I can wear to work, around the
      house, etc., to better evaluate long-term wear and comfort.

      TEST PLAN:

      There are a number of features of these shoes that I find intriguing
      and appealing, and several I'd like to put to the test. I like the
      fact that they are eco-friendly, but to be honest that's not
      something that usually factors into my footwear decisions. My two
      primary areas of evaluation will be all-around comfort (and since I
      sleep with my boots close at hand, I consider odor a comfort issue!)
      and waterproofness. Things I'd like to focus on evaluating during
      the test period include:

      *Comfort and fit: Do the shoes run true-to-size? Is the
      advertised "full toe box" roomy enough for my piggies (this is
      usually what makes or breaks a shoe's comfort for me)? Are the
      medium width, arch, and instep comfortable? Is the Capilene lining
      truly fast-wicking, quick-drying, and helpful in odor control? Do
      they feel good on day trips? How about those long-distance days
      under a pack? Is the ankle support and general stability adequate
      for my off-trail trips? Do they breathe adequately in warm
      weather? Is the weight of the shoes comfortable (it falls right in
      between my ultralight summer shoes and my old-standby boots in a
      weight range I've never used before)?

      *Features: Is the lacing solid, and easy to adjust? Does
      the "waterproof bootie" construction really keep my feet dry (this
      is a big issue for me in the rain here where I'm often puddle-
      jumping down the trail)? Does the "Air cushion compression molded
      midsole" really "cradle the foot and provide cushioning," and if so,
      how effectively? Does the air-cushioning disk in the midsole really
      aid in heel stability? Is the synthetic cork footbed comfortable,
      does it provide adequate support, cushioning, and stability, and
      does the carbon component really seem to help with odor? Does the
      Bi-Fit Dual Density insole board really provide support and
      stability as advertised? Does the bellows tongue keep out debris
      and water as advertised, and is it comfortable, or prone to bunching
      up? Does the Vibram Ecostep sole provide solid traction on all the
      surfaces I encounter, and can it hold up to the abrasive pumice and
      razor-sharp obsidian of central Oregon? How well do the components
      hold up to use, especially the cushioning components and protective
      mesh upper?

      PREVIOUSLY WRITTEN REPORTS
      My previous reviews can be found at
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/tester_reviews/thefishguy
      CURRENT TESTS
      Field Testing – White Sierra Trail Pants & Katadyn Backcountry Camp
      Filter
      PENDING APPLICATIONS
      OR Hydroseal Drycomp Airx sacks, OR Drycomp Summit Sack, Blue Desert
      SmarTube

      Thank you for your consideration!

      END OF APPLICATION
    • arnold
      I had the same problem. I got in touch with REI as they were listed, but it turns out they do not carry the Vagabond. I contacted City Sports the other
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 5 12:06 AM
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        I had the same problem. I got in touch with REI as they were listed, but it turns out they do not carry the Vagabond. I contacted City Sports the other outlet listed and although they carry Patagonia products close by, the Vagabond is not available locally.
        I have a hard time finding a good fit.
        Personal observation, if I can stand on a narrow rung ladder painting for at least 4 hours without discomfort, these boots have been good hiking boots.
        arnie

        "Mike C." <thefishguy@...> wrote:
        > I suspect the need to try on a pair (or similar model)
        > has hindered a few from applying but whith shoes/boots this will
        be
        > pretty much the way things work from now on (that's an educated
        > guess ).

        Coy,

        That was the problem for me . . . I couldn't find anyone within an
        hour an a half of here that carried them (one of the few drawbacks
        of living in the boonies!). I'm hesitant to try on a different pair
        of Patagonia shoes since they probabably use several different lasts
        for their shoes.

        I humbly submit to the powers that be an idea: might it be possible
        to ask manufacturers what other model shoes they produces that are
        built on the same lasts (for the sake of finding the right fit)?
        This might be especially helpful when a product is new, and perhaps
        not readily available yet.

        Just a thought . . . I'm not sure it's feasible, but thought I'd
        throw it out there . . .

        Mike C.






        later
        arnie
        email address pla63@...


        ---------------------------------
        Sick sense of humor? Visit Yahoo! TV's Comedy with an Edge to see what's on, when.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Rick Allnutt
        Arnold, Please see the note I posted back to Coy and the group. Knowing that you have tried on other Patagonia products goes a long way to persuade me that
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 5 5:20 AM
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          Arnold,

          Please see the note I posted back to Coy and the group. Knowing that
          you have tried on other Patagonia products goes a long way to persuade
          me that the shoes will fit.

          Rick
          Patagonia Moderator

          arnold wrote:
          >
          > I had the same problem. I got in touch with REI as they were listed,
          > but it turns out they do not carry the Vagabond. I contacted City
          > Sports the other outlet listed and although they carry Patagonia
          > products close by, the Vagabond is not available locally.
          > I have a hard time finding a good fit.
          > Personal observation, if I can stand on a narrow rung ladder painting
          > for at least 4 hours without discomfort, these boots have been good
          > hiking boots.
          > arnie
          >
          > "Mike C." <thefishguy@... <mailto:thefishguy%40hotmail.com>>
          > wrote:
          > > I suspect the need to try on a pair (or similar model)
          > > has hindered a few from applying but whith shoes/boots this will
          > be
          > > pretty much the way things work from now on (that's an educated
          > > guess ).
          >
          > Coy,
          >
          > That was the problem for me . . . I couldn't find anyone within an
          > hour an a half of here that carried them (one of the few drawbacks
          > of living in the boonies!). I'm hesitant to try on a different pair
          > of Patagonia shoes since they probabably use several different lasts
          > for their shoes.
          >
          > I humbly submit to the powers that be an idea: might it be possible
          > to ask manufacturers what other model shoes they produces that are
          > built on the same lasts (for the sake of finding the right fit)?
          > This might be especially helpful when a product is new, and perhaps
          > not readily available yet.
          >
          > Just a thought . . . I'm not sure it's feasible, but thought I'd
          > throw it out there . . .
          >
          > Mike C.
          >
          > later
          > arnie
          > email address pla63@... <mailto:pla63%40alumni.neu.edu>
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Sick sense of humor? Visit Yahoo! TV's Comedy with an Edge to see
          > what's on, when.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
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