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IR - Natural High Foods - Tim Tessier

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  • Tim Tessier
    NATURAL HIGH FOODS BY RICHMOOR CORPORATI TEST SERIES BY TIM TESSIER IR March 27, 2007 TESTER INFORMATION NAME: Tim Tessier EMAIL: timothy_tessier@yahoo.com
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 28, 2007
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      NATURAL HIGH FOODS BY RICHMOOR CORPORATI
      TEST SERIES BY TIM TESSIER
      IR
      March 27, 2007

      TESTER INFORMATION

      NAME: Tim Tessier
      EMAIL: timothy_tessier@...
      AGE: 49
      LOCATION: Greensboro NC
      GENDER: M
      HEIGHT: 6' 2" (1.88 m)
      WEIGHT: 215 lb (97.50 kg)

      Backpacking Background: I hiked as a child with my father and
      started hiking with my now 15 year old son 7 years ago. We now
      routinely take 20 mile weekend hikes (2 nights) approximately once a
      month year round. Additionally, we take one, 5 - 7 day extended trip
      each summer. Most of our hiking is done in NC, southern VA, TN, KY,
      and WV. We go regardless of weather so we have experience in all
      types of conditions. We do not tend to travel very light, with a
      typical pack weight of 25 lb (11.3 kg) exclusive of food.


      INITIAL REPORT

      PRODUCT INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS

      Manufacturer: Richmoor Corporation
      Year of Manufacture: 2007
      Manufacturer's Website: <<www.richmoor.com>>
      MSRP: US$$4.25 - $6.75
      Listed Weight: 4 - 6.5 oz (113 - 184 g)
      Measured Weight: 4.25 - 6.75 oz (120 - 191g)
      Other details: I received a package of five separate Natural High
      meals. Each of them is designed to feed two. Among these are three
      main courses, one breakfast meal, and one desert. The individual
      information on each is as follows:

      Item
      Price Listed Wt. Measured
      Wt.
      Cheese Enchilada Ranchero
      $6.25 6.25 oz. (177 g.) 6.5 oz. (184
      g.)
      "A traditional Mexican cheese enchilada with soft tortillas mild
      seasoning and aged cheddar cheese."
      Contains: Tortillas, rice, cheeses, and spices to create a saucy
      broth.
      420 calories including 180 calories from fat

      Spicy Thai Chicken
      $6.75 5.15 oz. (146 g.) 5.5 oz. (156
      g.)
      "Broccoli and spinach combine with chicken in a spicy peanut sauce
      with noodles."
      Contains: Pasta, diced chicken, soy sauce powder, peanut powder, and
      various vegetables.
      290 calories including 25 from fat

      I Can't Believe it's Cheese Pizza
      $5.25 5.75 oz. (163 g.) 6.0 oz. (170
      g.)
      Deep dish cheese, tomato, and basil
      Contains Two Parts: The crust has flour, natural butter flavor, sweet
      cream powder. The sauce contains tomato sauce, two types of cheese,
      parmesan cheese powder, various spices.
      272 calories including 36 from fat.
      (This is a slight departure from the others as two pans are
      required. An oiled skillet is required for the crust, and the sauce
      is made in the pouch.)

      Granola with Raspberries and Milk $4.25
      6.5 oz. (184 g.) 6.75 oz. (191 g.)
      "Rolled oats, freeze dried raspberries, and sliced almonds in
      molasses with honey and milk for a quick and nutritious breakfast."
      Contains: French Vanilla Granola, Honey, Cornstarch, Almonds, and
      natural flavorings.
      380 calories including 90 from fat

      Cinnamon Apple Crisp
      $4.25 4.0 oz. (113 g.) 4.25 oz.
      (120 g.)
      Sliced apple, cinnamon and raisins in brown sugar with a buttery
      granola topping."
      Filling contains: Brown Sugar, Diced Apples, Raisins, food starch,
      cinnamon, orange peel. Topping contains: French Vanilla Granola,
      crisp rice, honey, cornstarch, almonds.
      230 calories including 20 from fat.

      The dishes are dehydrated food products. These products are designed
      for the user to stir in boiling water, wait the specified amount of
      time, stir again and eat directly from the pouch. There are a number
      of advantages for the backpacker inherent in this type of product.
      The largest is that after a long day of hiking (with some
      exceptions) one can simply heat and eat, lick off the spork, and the
      dishes are done. The second is that the user can carry only one pan
      (for heating water) and no other cookware. Another advantage is that
      this type of meal is lightweight and produces very little scent which
      makes it less of an attractive target for bears.

      In examining the contents of the meals I noticed that the ingredients
      seem to be good healthy mix of real food products. There are no
      added chemicals in any of the products which is refreshing to see.

      INITIAL IMPRESSIONS

      Each dish for two comes in a four-color foil package. The packages
      are appoximately 7.9" X 10.0" (201 mm X 254 mm) in size. Each
      package is sealed at the top and has a resealable zipper
      approximately 3" (76 mm) from the top. Between the two is a notch
      where the user can tear the pouch open.

      The general use is to tear the top off of the pouch, open the
      resealable zipper, remove the oxygen absorber, and add water per the
      directions. The pouch is then resealed for a period of time while
      the product inside cooks.

      The pouches say in a number of places that there is an oxygen
      absorber inside. This is designed to keep the product fresh and
      extend shelf life. However, the necessity of finding the small
      oxygen absorber in a package of food can be daunting in poor light.
      It also necessitates pawing through your food, prior to cooking with
      your bare hands. This is not always an appetizing prospect when
      you've been out in the woods for several days.

      The packages are attractive and well marked. They should remain
      watertight and airtight even while smashed into the bottom of a
      backpack.

      READING THE INSTRUCTIONS

      The directions are printed on each pouch. They are quite detailed
      and easy to follow. Each package contains an oxygen absorber that
      must be removed prior to preparation. Then typically preparation is
      as easy as adding water, waiting a few minutes and eating.
      Directions on each package must be read, however, as the directions
      vary from dish to dish. I would like to see the directions printed
      in a larger font, as the font size used would be difficult to read in
      poor light, or without my glasses. This sort of accident is no
      problem at home but the likelihood of this happening in the
      backcountry is greatly increased.

      One of the products (Cheese Enchilada Ranchero) has modified
      directions for "High Altitudes". Unfortunately, they don't define
      High Altitudes. I feel that this is a signficant oversight as
      someone from the coast may consider 6,000 ft. (1,829 m) to be high
      elevation, while someone from the mountains may not consider 9,000
      ft. (2,743 m) to be particuarly high.

      TESTING STRATEGY

      I will be using these products on some upcoming weekend outings. I
      will carefully follow the directions and record my impressions on the
      taste, texture, and appeal of each offering. As food tasting is, by
      definition, subjective in nature, I will be sharing these meals with
      my son to gain his impressions as well.

      We will be paying special attention to the consistency of the
      finished product. Is the rice cooked thoroughly or still crunchy?
      Are the noodles a good consistency? Do the flavors in the sauces
      blend adequately?

      Also we will report as to whether a serving for two is indeed that,
      or is it inadequate to fill two hungry hikers.

      Please check back in a couple of months for a full report on these
      products.

      SUMMARY

      A brief summary.



      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2007. All rights reserved.
    • AndrĂ© Corterier
      EDIT: IR - Natural High Foods - Tim Tessier Tim, this is the official Edit of your Natural High Foods Initial Report. As per the Bylaws, it takes the following
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 1, 2007
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        EDIT: IR - Natural High Foods - Tim Tessier

        Tim, this is the official Edit of your Natural High Foods Initial
        Report. As per the Bylaws, it takes the following form: EDITs must be
        changed, Edits should be considered, and Comments are only that.

        EDIT: Your post lacks a link to the HTML version in the test folder.
        As far as I can see, the test folder also lacks an HTML version.
        Shane has listed your report as having been posted, and so I am
        editing it, but there was a policy decision made not too long ago
        that a post without a link to the HTML version would not count as
        having been posted at all. You seem to have lucked out this time. I
        am drawing your attention to this so you don't run into problems with
        that later on. However, as I am unable to check your HTML version, I
        will also have to ask you to Repost your edited version, along with a
        link to the HTML version, before giving you the go-ahead to upload.
        Usually, on test reports (rather than Owner Reviews), the Edit goes
        along with the Upload Approval.

        --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Tim Tessier"
        <timothy_tessier@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > NATURAL HIGH FOODS BY RICHMOOR CORPORATI
        > TEST SERIES BY TIM TESSIER
        > IR
        > March 27, 2007
        >
        > TESTER INFORMATION
        >
        > NAME: Tim Tessier
        > EMAIL: timothy_tessier@...
        > AGE: 49
        > LOCATION: Greensboro NC
        > GENDER: M
        > HEIGHT: 6' 2" (1.88 m)
        > WEIGHT: 215 lb (97.50 kg)
        >
        > Backpacking Background: I hiked as a child with my father and
        > started hiking with my now 15 year old son 7 years ago. We now
        > routinely take 20 mile weekend hikes (2 nights) approximately once
        a
        > month year round. Additionally, we take one, 5 - 7 day extended
        trip
        > each summer. Most of our hiking is done in NC, southern VA, TN,
        KY,
        > and WV.

        EDIT: Please spell out the states. There's a bunch of ignorant
        foreigners around who may not know what you're referring to.
        ;-)

        We go regardless of weather so we have experience in all
        > types of conditions. We do not tend to travel very light, with a
        > typical pack weight of 25 lb (11.3 kg) exclusive of food.
        >
        >
        > INITIAL REPORT
        >
        > PRODUCT INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS
        >
        > Manufacturer: Richmoor Corporation
        > Year of Manufacture: 2007
        > Manufacturer's Website: <<www.richmoor.com>>
        > MSRP: US$$4.25 - $6.75

        Edit: I'd think there's a superfluous "$" sign in there.

        > Listed Weight: 4 - 6.5 oz (113 - 184 g)
        > Measured Weight: 4.25 - 6.75 oz (120 - 191g)

        Edit: According to the list you give below, they are all overweight
        by .25 oz (except the Spicy Thai Chicken at .35 oz). I am ASSuming
        that the weight printed on it refers to the net weight of the
        *content*, while you may be weighing the package along with the
        content (kind of hard to do otherwise without opening it). If so, it
        would be good of you to state so. Also, it would then be *very good*
        to weigh one of the packages later on when you've opened one and
        mention its weight in a later report (or add that information to the
        top of your IR when you append your FR). And to double-check your
        weight on the Spicy Chicken (in my experience, net weight content
        printed on foodstuffs is the one area in which the manufacturer's
        specs are usually exact).

        > Other details: I received a package of five separate Natural High
        > meals. Each of them is designed to feed two. Among these are
        three
        > main courses, one breakfast meal, and one desert. The individual
        > information on each is as follows:
        >
        >
        Item
        > Price Listed Wt.
        Measured
        > Wt.
        > Cheese Enchilada Ranchero
        > $6.25 6.25 oz. (177 g.) 6.5 oz. (184
        > g.)
        > "A traditional Mexican cheese enchilada with soft tortillas mild
        > seasoning and aged cheddar cheese."
        > Contains: Tortillas, rice, cheeses, and spices to create a saucy
        > broth.
        > 420 calories including 180 calories from fat
        >
        > Spicy Thai Chicken
        > $6.75 5.15 oz. (146 g.) 5.5 oz.
        (156
        > g.)
        > "Broccoli and spinach combine with chicken in a spicy peanut sauce
        > with noodles."
        > Contains: Pasta, diced chicken, soy sauce powder, peanut powder,
        and
        > various vegetables.
        > 290 calories including 25 from fat
        >
        > I Can't Believe it's Cheese Pizza
        > $5.25 5.75 oz. (163 g.) 6.0 oz.
        (170
        > g.)
        > Deep dish cheese, tomato, and basil
        > Contains Two Parts: The crust has flour, natural butter flavor,
        sweet
        > cream powder. The sauce contains tomato sauce, two types of
        cheese,
        > parmesan cheese powder, various spices.
        > 272 calories including 36 from fat.
        > (This is a slight departure from the others as two pans are
        > required. An oiled skillet is required for the crust, and the
        sauce
        > is made in the pouch.)
        >
        > Granola with Raspberries and Milk
        $4.25
        > 6.5 oz. (184 g.) 6.75 oz. (191 g.)
        > "Rolled oats, freeze dried raspberries, and sliced almonds in
        > molasses with honey and milk for a quick and nutritious breakfast."
        > Contains: French Vanilla Granola, Honey, Cornstarch, Almonds, and
        > natural flavorings.
        > 380 calories including 90 from fat
        >
        > Cinnamon Apple Crisp
        > $4.25 4.0 oz. (113 g.) 4.25 oz.
        > (120 g.)
        > Sliced apple, cinnamon and raisins in brown sugar with a buttery
        > granola topping."
        > Filling contains: Brown Sugar, Diced Apples, Raisins, food starch,
        > cinnamon, orange peel. Topping contains: French Vanilla Granola,
        > crisp rice, honey, cornstarch, almonds.
        > 230 calories including 20 from fat.
        >
        > The dishes are dehydrated food products. These products are
        designed
        > for the user to stir in boiling water, wait the specified amount of
        > time, stir again and eat directly from the pouch. There are a
        number
        > of advantages for the backpacker inherent in this type of product.

        EDIT: This is projection. The advantages you mention below may be
        inherent in this product - if it works as advertised. You don't know
        yet whether it works at all. For all we know at this point in time,
        they might all turn into black chunks of something even my
        neighbour's dog won't eat. I'll admit that you're likely right on
        most or all counts, but so far that is only an expectation. It is
        *okay* to phrase this as an expectation you have regarding this
        product. Finding out whether or not the product lives up to this
        expectation is the point of this test (and thus something you're
        expected to report on in the FR). So, please rephrase (it actually
        reads like an ad right now).

        > The largest is that after a long day of hiking (with some
        > exceptions) one can simply heat and eat, lick off the spork, and
        the
        > dishes are done. The second is that the user can carry only one
        pan
        > (for heating water) and no other cookware. Another advantage is
        that
        > this type of meal is lightweight and produces very little scent
        which
        > makes it less of an attractive target for bears.
        >
        > In examining the contents of the meals I noticed that the
        ingredients
        > seem to be good healthy mix

        EDIT. "a" good healthy mix

        of real food products. There are no
        > added chemicals in any of the products which is refreshing to see.

        Edit: We don't really know that, either. I would prefer stating
        that "according to the manufacturer, ..." etc. Maybe you don't have
        to be as nitpicky about this as I am, but please consider it.

        >
        > INITIAL IMPRESSIONS
        >
        > Each dish for two comes in a four-color foil package. The packages
        > are appoximately 7.9" X 10.0" (201 mm X 254 mm) in size. Each
        > package is sealed at the top and has a resealable zipper
        > approximately 3" (76 mm) from the top. Between the two is a notch
        > where the user can tear the pouch open.

        EDIT: Projection again. Yes, I'll admit most readers will indeed be
        able to tear them open. I do know people who can't open a package of
        candy without scissors. So - to avoid projection, just generally
        phrase whatever it is you're trying to say in terms of "your"
        experience *or* expectation. This will result in you using terms
        like "I" a lot and terms like "you" or "someone" or "user" very
        little, preferably not at all. This is actually a key policy at
        BackpackGearTest.org.

        >
        > The general use is to tear the top off of the pouch, open the

        Comment: I believe "off of" is okay as colloquial style, though
        grammatically the "of" is wrong after the "off". A question of *your*
        style.

        > resealable zipper, remove the oxygen absorber, and add water per
        the
        > directions. The pouch is then resealed for a period of time while
        > the product inside cooks.
        >
        > The pouches say in a number of places that there is an oxygen
        > absorber inside. This is designed to keep the product fresh and
        > extend shelf life. However, the necessity of finding the small
        > oxygen absorber in a package of food can be daunting in poor light.

        Edit: This sounds as though you have experience with this. If so,
        please state so (with "similar products" or with this product). If
        not, please phrase as a possible concern.

        > It also necessitates pawing through your food, prior to cooking
        with
        > your bare hands. This is not always an appetizing prospect when
        > you've been out in the woods for several days.

        EDIT: Projection again. *I* wouldn't care about this (I'm
        disinfecting the food with boiling water, after all). Please rephrase
        without use of the word "you".

        > The packages are attractive and well marked. They should remain
        > watertight and airtight even while smashed into the bottom of a
        > backpack.

        EDIT: This is another type of projection: You're stating an
        expectation as though it's a fact (yes, I can see you're
        saying "should" rather than "will", so it's not *quite* a statement
        of fact). Please phrase this as an expectation. Please also state
        what the reason for your expectation is - do the pouches have a
        sturdy feel, is this your eperience with this or a similarly packaged
        product? Following the statement that the packages are "attractive
        and well marked" is a non sequitur.

        > READING THE INSTRUCTIONS
        >
        > The directions are printed on each pouch. They are quite detailed
        > and easy to follow. Each package contains an oxygen absorber that
        > must be removed prior to preparation. Then typically preparation
        is
        > as easy as adding water, waiting a few minutes and eating.
        > Directions on each package must be read, however, as the directions
        > vary from dish to dish. I would like to see the directions printed
        > in a larger font, as the font size used would be difficult to read
        in
        > poor light, or without my glasses.

        EDIT: Again, projection. And easily remedied by turning down the
        light and/or taking off your glasses, after which you can
        affirmatively state this as your own experience (if you find your
        expectation proven right).

        This sort of accident is no
        > problem at home but the likelihood of this happening in the
        > backcountry is greatly increased.
        >
        > One of the products (Cheese Enchilada Ranchero) has modified
        > directions for "High Altitudes". Unfortunately, they don't define
        > High Altitudes. I feel that this is a signficant oversight as
        > someone from the coast may consider 6,000 ft. (1,829 m) to be high
        > elevation, while someone from the mountains may not consider 9,000
        > ft. (2,743 m) to be particuarly high.

        Comment: Good point. Hadn't thought of that. I *do* live at sea level
        and indeed would consider 6000 ft (1800 m) "high".

        > TESTING STRATEGY
        >
        > I will be using these products on some upcoming weekend outings. I
        > will carefully follow the directions and record my impressions on
        the
        > taste, texture, and appeal of each offering. As food tasting is,
        by
        > definition, subjective in nature, I will be sharing these meals
        with
        > my son to gain his impressions as well.
        >
        > We will be paying special attention to the consistency of the
        > finished product. Is the rice cooked thoroughly or still crunchy?
        > Are the noodles a good consistency? Do the flavors in the sauces
        > blend adequately?
        >
        > Also we will report as to whether a serving for two is indeed that,
        > or is it inadequate to fill two hungry hikers.

        Comment: Can't wait for that verdict to come in. In my own
        experience, a hungry 15 year old is impossible to satisfy with any
        amount of food.
        ;-)

        >
        > Please check back in a couple of months for a full report on these
        > products.
        >
        > SUMMARY
        >
        > A brief summary.

        EDIT: ... would be good. Or, you leave this one out and/or leave it
        for the FR. (Yes, I know, it's boilerplated into the Report
        Generator - just delete it, then.)

        >
        >
        >
        > This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
        > Copyright 2007. All rights reserved.

        Thanks for the report, Tim. Please get an HTML version of the edited
        report into the test folder and repost the edited text version - with
        a link to the test folder version and "REPOST" instead of my "EDIT"
        in the subject line - to this list.

        I understand that adjusting to the conventions we have hear at
        BackpackGearTest.org can be a bit overwhelming in the beginning.
        Never fear, it'll be second nature soon enough and there really are
        good reasons for them (I'd be happy to discuss them offline if you'd
        like). And there are always the friendly folks in the UploadHelp
        group if there are any other difficulties.

        That's it for now - thanks for submitting your report on time and I'm
        looking forward to the HTML version. Please remember that a picture
        is needed, though it is okay to rely on the manufacturer's website
        for it.

        André
        Richmoor Food Editor
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