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LTR - MontBell Thermawrap UL - Colleen

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  • Emma Eyeball
    here is the LTR section of my MontBell report. the complete report can be viewed in the Test folder:
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 1, 2007
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      here is the LTR section of my MontBell report. the complete report
      can be viewed in the Test folder:

      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/MontBell%20Thermawrap%20Colleen/

      +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

      Long Term Report

      Oh yes, it's love. After 4 months of using the Thermawrap at least
      once every week, carrying it on every hike, wearing it in blasting
      wind, in the snow, in cold fog, on a wind-whipped peak... I love this
      jacket. The only thing that could make it more perfect would be a
      hood, and MontBell offers a Thermawrap Parka with just that feature.
      How do I love the Thermawrap? Let me count the ways.

      Pockets. The openings are high enough to get into even with a belted
      backpack, and deep enough that nothing has ever fallen out - despite
      the fact that there are no closures and no flaps. The interior
      pockets are deep and roomy, and the jacket can actually stuff into one
      if you want that.

      Fabric. The fabric's DWR is quite solid. When I hand-washed the
      Thermawrap in order to get smoke odors out, it was quite difficult to
      get any water to permeate through the fabric. However, when the
      jacket was set down in the snow and some snow was allowed to melt on
      it and then it was grabbed at the wet spot, it did begin to wet out.
      The fabric is a touch slippery under pack straps, but nothing that has
      ever caused a problem. I did snag the Thermawrap roughly three times,
      but the snags were small and never expanded. The fabric does not seem
      to "catch" easily.

      Fit. I love the fit of the Thermawrap. It is comfortable and never
      feels stretched tight across my back. The sleeves stay in place quite
      well - they don't seem to ride up at all. The elastic keeps the cuffs
      nicely sealed. The rear of the collar has a tendency to roll away
      from my neck and down a bit. This is a bit of a mystery, but not an
      annoyance.

      Wind Resistance. I did find that the Thermawrap is inadequate to
      completely fend off winds of 60-70 mph/97 - 113 kph, but other than
      that particularly fierce windstorm (dodging tumbleweeds at that speed
      is fun!), the Thermawrap was delightfully warm even in brisk, stiff
      winds. Alas, that storm was the only time when I had access to wind
      speed data. I did wear it once on a mountain peak at 49 F/9 C with
      winds that occasionally gusted strongly enough to affect my balance.
      The Thermawrap, layered over a t-shirt weight merino wool shirt, was
      not quite enough to keep the chill away, but adding a second layer of
      merino wool did the trick.

      Weight. It's 8.4 oz/238 g!!

      Warmth. I've slept in the Thermawrap, in a sleeping bag, on nights
      that dropped into the mid-20's F/roughly -4 C. I've worn it in the
      snow on a day that hovered around 35 F/2 C. Except for times when by
      my own foolishness I've let myself get too cold (sitting around on
      cold ground in the shade too long, drinking something very cold on a
      cold day), I have always been comfy and toasty in the Thermawrap.
      Since the neck opening is rather spacious and I have a slender neck I
      have had to occasionally augment it with a scarf or neck gaiter, which
      is why a hooded model (the Thermawrap Parka) would possibly be, for
      me, the perfect synthetic insulated jacket. It is too warm to wear
      while walking or otherwise being active in temperatures above 60 F/16
      C, but from 50 F/10 C, I've been pretty content to leave it on the
      whole day (bear in mind I tend to be cold-blooded).

      Conclusions. The Thermawrap is a winner. Unless I replace it with a
      Thermawrap Parka (only for the hood), it has earned a permanent spot
      in my gear kit. This is a stellar jacket.

      Thank you very much to both MontBell and BackpackGearTest.org for the
      opportunity to try out the Women's U.L. Thermawrap.
    • AndrĂ© Corterier
      ... Colleen, thanks for your LTR. Very few Edits below, as per the usual convention. ... wrote: ... Comment: I like that. Would you want
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 2, 2007
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        > EDIT: LTR - MontBell Thermawrap UL - Colleen

        Colleen, thanks for your LTR. Very few Edits below, as per the usual
        convention.

        --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Emma Eyeball"
        <tarbubble@...> wrote:
        <snip>
        > How do I love the Thermawrap? Let me count the ways.

        Comment: I like that. Would you want to put a colon at the end of
        that? Your call entirely. Nice picture, too.

        > Pockets. The openings are high enough to get into even with a
        belted
        > backpack, and deep enough that nothing has ever fallen out - despite
        > the fact that there are no closures and no flaps. The interior
        > pockets are deep and roomy, and the jacket can actually stuff into
        one
        > if you want that.

        Comment: "if *you* want that" is what made me read this sentence
        again (you have to be aware that I'm a snoop for the projection
        police). I've tried to delete "you" from my vocabulary as far as
        reports are concerned, to help eliminate projection. How about ".. I
        can stuff the jacket into a pocket if/when I want that" ?
        A Comment, not an Edit.

        > Fabric. The fabric's DWR is quite solid. When I hand-washed the
        > Thermawrap in order to get smoke odors out, it was quite difficult
        to
        > get any water to permeate through the fabric.

        Edit: the verb "permeate" renders "through" redundant.

        <snip>

        > Wind Resistance. I did find that the Thermawrap is inadequate to
        > completely fend off winds of 60-70 mph/97 - 113 kph, but other than
        > that particularly fierce windstorm (dodging tumbleweeds at that
        speed
        > is fun!)

        Comment: I'm visualizing it - 100-klick tumbleweeds. What fun. I
        really don't get out enough...

        <snip>
        > Since the neck opening is rather spacious and I have a slender neck
        I
        > have had to occasionally augment it with a scarf or neck gaiter,
        which
        > is why a hooded model (the Thermawrap Parka) would possibly be, for
        > me, the perfect synthetic insulated jacket. It is too warm to wear
        > while walking or otherwise being active in temperatures above 60
        F/16
        > C, but from 50 F/10 C, I've been pretty content to leave it on the
        > whole day (bear in mind I tend to be cold-blooded).

        Comment: I understand the gist of what you mean by being cold-blooded
        in this instance, though only due to context (I have similar issues
        with people stating that they are "warm" or "cold" sleepers - I never
        know what they mean by that, though that may just be me).

        Comment: You're aware that the Thermawarp Parka doesn't just add a
        hood, but also adds 30g/m^2 (1 oz/1.2 yd^2) of insulation? MontBell
        describes it as "far" warmer and I doubt them not. Maybe the right
        kind of neck gaiter/buff/beanie/whatever combination will do more to
        put you in the "just right" thermal window - likely at less weight
        and expense, too.

        > Conclusions. The Thermawrap is a winner. Unless I replace it with
        a
        > Thermawrap Parka (only for the hood), it has earned a permanent spot
        > in my gear kit. This is a stellar jacket.
        >
        > Thank you very much to both MontBell and BackpackGearTest.org for
        the
        > opportunity to try out the Women's U.L. Thermawrap.
        >

        Thank *you* for making this an easy and enjoyable test to monitor,
        having your reports in on time, with working links, etc. I currently
        (sometimes) carry a pile vest for warmth which weighs the same, but
        due to its open structure, loses much of its insulative ability when
        worn on top, rather than beneath a shell (and of course fails to warm
        my arms at all). Should I be in a position to go for longer, cold-
        weather outings, you (and your co-testers) have put this jacket high
        on my wish-list!

        Once you've considered the above, please upload at your earliest
        convenience and please remember to delete the test folder item. And
        then there's another one for the history books!

        And your first test in the new statistics, with a perfect score. Good
        on ya.

        André
        MontBell Thermawrap Monitor
      • Emma Eyeball
        Andre, what kind comments in your edit. thank you, truly. and it s hard to be the monitor on a test where all teh reports come back glowing. it really
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 5, 2007
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          Andre, what kind comments in your edit. thank you, truly. and it's
          hard to be the monitor on a test where all teh reports come back
          glowing. it really inspires gear lust.

          i have gone back through and removed the references to the Thermawrap
          parka, because I didn't realize how much heavier-duty a jacket it is.
          thank you for pointing that out to me. all other comments & edits
          have been addressed as well. i *love* input and am actually kind of
          disappointed when i get no edits. yeah, i'm weird like that. ;)

          thanks!

          -colleen
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