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FR - Tilley LTM6 Airflo Hat

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  • AsABat
    Tilley LTM6 Airflo Hat - Field Report by Bill AsABat Jeffrey Email: wjj2001 at yahoo dot com May 17, 2005 Tester Personal Biographical Information Bill
    Message 1 of 6 , May 17 8:06 PM
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      Tilley LTM6 Airflo Hat - Field Report
      by Bill "AsABat" Jeffrey
      Email: wjj2001 "at" yahoo "dot" com
      May 17, 2005

      Tester Personal Biographical Information

      Bill Jeffrey
      47 year old male, 6'4" (193 cm) tall, 225 pounds (102 kg)
      San Diego County, California
      Email: wjj2001 "at" yahoo "dot" com

      I have over 30 years backpacking experience, starting with Scouting
      as a youth. I am currently the High Adventure Leader for a Scout
      Troop. I try to get out once or twice a month, plus at least one week-
      long trek each year. My trips are of two types. First, I am hiking
      the Pacific Crest Trail in sections, and generally use a lightweight
      approach on these typically solo trips. Other trips involving family
      involve more traditional backpacking equipment. Terrain varies from
      sea level to 14,000 feet (4,300 m), desert to mountain, and trail to
      cross country, occasionally including snow travel.

      I really do not like to wear hats, but I have no choice. My eyes are
      extremely sensitive to light, so I have a collection of mostly cheap
      hats I wear whenever I spend much time outdoors. For hiking I use one
      of several floppy nylon hats, which become floppier the longer I wear
      them, and give me a rather rag-tag look. Working in the yard it is
      usually a larger straw lifeguard hat. Of course, I have an extensive
      collection of baseball caps picked up at various events, none of
      which shield my eyes when the sun is at my side, let alone protect my
      ears from sunburn.

      This is the second of three reports of the Tilley LTM6 Airflo Hat
      based on use over the last two months. The first report described the
      socks in detail. My next report will discuss durability and comfort
      over a longer period.

      * Product Description: Classy lightweight outdoor hat
      * Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price is $68.00 (USD)
      * Lifetime guarantee
      * http://www.tilley.com
      * Weight: Stated 3 ounces (85 g), actual 3-1/2 ounces (100 g) for
      size 7-7/8
      * Inside circumference of size 7-7/8 measures 24-5/8 inches (63.5 cm)
      * Brim 2-5/8 inches (6.7 cm) wide at the sides and 3-3/8 inches (8.6
      cm) at the front and back for size 7-7/8
      * Crown about 4-1/2 inches (11.4 cm) tall with polyester mesh for *
      ventilation around top of crown
      * Tilley Nylamtium, which appears similar to nylon supplex
      * Water and mildew resistant
      * Ultraviolet protection factor of 50+ blocks 98 percent of UV
      radiation
      * Brim edge lined with wire to maintain shape
      * Single cord holds hat in place in the wind at both front and back
      * "Hydrofil" wicking sweat band
      * Pocket inside hat



      Field Test:

      The Tilley has gone with me on every outdoor adventure since I
      received it two months ago. I will describe three outings.

      Snowshoes on the Pacific Crest

      Right after receiving my Tilley, I set out to the mountains above Big
      Bear Lake for a two-day snowshoe. Temperatures under mostly sunny
      skies ranged from 32 degrees F (0 C) at sunrise to near 70 F (21 C)
      at about 7,000 feet (2,100 m) elevation. About 75 percent of the
      route was covered in up to four feet (1.2 m) of snow.

      I immediately appreciated the full brim of the hat as it kept the
      early morning sun out of my eyes. I was pleased to find that the hat
      provided just the right amount of warmth while hiking in the cool
      air. Encountering a light breeze atop a ridge, the hat stayed on well
      with the cord just secured at the back of my head. When the wind
      picked up a bit on steeper slopes, I used the cord under my chin as
      well rather than have to chase the hat down the hill. As the day
      warmed, and the climb on snowy slopes became steeper, the wicking
      sweatband and mesh ventilation kept sweat from running down my face,
      which is unusual for me on these climbs.

      The hat did a great job of keeping the sun off my face. I did not do
      as good a job, however, at following the directions saying to still
      use sunscreen. I received a light sunburn on the lower part of my
      face, mostly under my chin and nose where the sun reflected off the
      snow. Even a sharp hat like this cannot make one act sharp all time
      time!

      Trails are typically constructed with tree branches trimmed for an
      eight-foot (2.5 m) overhead clearance. With all the snow on the
      ground, I often had to duck to avoid these branches. Sometimes I
      didn't duck enough, and my head hit said branch. I was worried my hat
      would be damaged, but it only sustained a light scuff that washed off
      easily with a bit of water.

      Canoeing

      A second trip shortly thereafter took me to Lake Hodges for a half-
      day canoe trip. The heavy rains we received this year filled the
      lake, which had been nearly empty for several years. During the dry
      spell, willow trees grew tall in the lake bed, and those trees are
      now partially submerged, making for fun paddles amid their branches.
      The temperature that day was near 85 F (29 C). The elevation is 300
      feet (100 m).

      I secured the chin strap snug, applied my sunscreen, and set off. The
      Tilley AirFlo is so light it's almost unnoticeable on my head. On the
      trip out several low branches tried to knock the hat off my head, and
      on the way back a strong wind picked up going through The Narrows. I
      had no fear that the hat would blow off, without any discomfort or
      chafing from the chin strap.

      Pacific Crest Trail Kick Off

      Visiting Lake Morena near the southern end of the Pacific Crest Trail
      provided another opportunity to test the Tilley. Arriving at the camp
      early, I took a mountain bike ride up a dirt road to a ridge
      overlooking the lake. Heading down at a rather good speed, the hat
      stayed secure when I used the chin strap. The following evening, a
      light rain came in and the Tilley kept my head quite dry and warm.
      More importantly, with 600 hardcore hikers in camp, several of them
      recognized that, since I was wearing a Tilley, I was a person of
      character.

      Next:

      So far, the Tilley AirFlo keeps my sweaty head cool, still looks
      good, has repeled a bit of light rain, and hasn't blown away in the
      wind.

      The hat will be used on all my hikes during the next several months
      (and beyond given my love of this hat already). Later this month I
      will spend a week backpacking the Pacific Crest Trail across the San
      Gabriel Mountains, with elevations between 3,000 and 9,000 feet (900
      to 2,700 m). Later this summer I plan a backpack in the Sierra Nevada
      north of with elevations up to 10,000 feet (3,000 m). The weather
      could be anything from a warm and dry 90 degrees F (32 C) to a
      pleasant 30 F (-1 C). I expect wind and anticipate rain. During this
      test I will look at:

      * Ventilation: I crank out a lot of heat and often find myself
      removing my hat to fan the sweat from my head. As the summer warms
      up, will the Tilley still keep me cool and dry?

      * Appearance and Comfort: Will the hat maintain it's style so I don't
      look like a vagrant when I hike into town?

      * Guaranteed for Life: As this hat will be drafted for use on all my
      outings for the next four months, it will experience the worst I can
      give it. My hats get stuffed in my backpack, stuffed in the back of
      my pants, and used to hold loose items in my tent. Will the seams
      stay tight? Will the fabric fray? Will I outlast the hat?

      * Floats: An interesting claim. I do wear my hat when I visit a sunny
      swimming hole, so this claim will also be tested.

      * Repels rain: While some moisture can be expected to enter the mesh
      or grommets, how well does the hat keep my face and glasses dry? Do
      the brims sag as they get soaked? Does the hat dry quickly, or will
      it be a soggy mat upon my head? Does the hat fit comfortably under
      the hood of my raincoat?

      * Won't shrink: Does the preshrunk fabric really work as claimed?

      * Anti-sweat band: Yeah, right. Again, as summer approaches, will the
      band really pick up sweat from my forehead and move it to my temple
      area for evaporation without it running down my face?

      * Cleaning: How well does the fabric resist stains? Does it dry
      quickly after washing? Do the instructions for removing wrinkles work
      (on the hat, not my forehead)?
    • Chuck Carnes
      Bill, sorry this took so long. I had it marked as already editing it but it wasn t sent. Here it is. Edits marked as **** ... *** This gets to be a little bit
      Message 2 of 6 , May 26 12:03 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Bill, sorry this took so long. I had it marked as
        already editing it but it wasn't sent. Here it is.
        Edits marked as ****


        --- AsABat <wjj2001@...> wrote:

        > Tilley LTM6 Airflo Hat - Field Report
        > by Bill "AsABat" Jeffrey
        > Email: wjj2001 "at" yahoo "dot" com
        > May 17, 2005
        >
        > Tester Personal Biographical Information
        >
        > Bill Jeffrey
        > 47 year old male, 6'4" (193 cm) tall, 225 pounds
        > (102 kg)
        > San Diego County, California
        > Email: wjj2001 "at" yahoo "dot" com
        >
        > I have over 30 years backpacking experience,
        > starting with Scouting
        > as a youth. I am currently the High Adventure Leader
        > for a Scout
        > Troop. I try to get out once or twice a month, plus
        > at least one week-
        > long trek each year. My trips are of two types.
        > First, I am hiking
        > the Pacific Crest Trail in sections, and generally
        > use a lightweight
        > approach on these typically solo trips. Other trips
        > involving family
        > involve more traditional backpacking equipment.
        > Terrain varies from
        > sea level to 14,000 feet (4,300 m), desert to
        > mountain, and trail to
        > cross country, occasionally including snow travel.
        >
        > I really do not like to wear hats, but I have no
        > choice. My eyes are
        > extremely sensitive to light, so I have a collection
        > of mostly cheap
        > hats I wear whenever I spend much time outdoors. For
        > hiking I use one
        > of several floppy nylon hats, which become floppier
        > the longer I wear
        > them, and give me a rather rag-tag look. Working in
        > the yard it is
        > usually a larger straw lifeguard hat. Of course, I
        > have an extensive
        > collection of baseball caps picked up at various
        > events, none of
        > which shield my eyes when the sun is at my side, let
        > alone protect my
        > ears from sunburn.

        *** This gets to be a little bit long. I think BGT
        wants to see our Personal Biographical stuff to be
        shorter. See if you can compress this a little.

        >
        > This is the second of three reports of the Tilley
        > LTM6 Airflo Hat
        > based on use over the last two months. The first
        > report described the

        ***> socks in detail.
        I think you ment to say 'hat'

        > My next report will discuss
        > durability and comfort
        > over a longer period.
        >
        > * Product Description: Classy lightweight outdoor
        > hat
        > * Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price is $68.00
        > (USD)
        > * Lifetime guarantee
        > * http://www.tilley.com
        > * Weight: Stated 3 ounces (85 g), actual 3-1/2
        > ounces (100 g) for
        > size 7-7/8
        > * Inside circumference of size 7-7/8 measures 24-5/8
        > inches (63.5 cm)
        > * Brim 2-5/8 inches (6.7 cm) wide at the sides and
        > 3-3/8 inches (8.6
        > cm) at the front and back for size 7-7/8
        > * Crown about 4-1/2 inches (11.4 cm) tall with
        > polyester mesh for *
        > ventilation around top of crown
        > * Tilley Nylamtium, which appears similar to nylon
        > supplex
        > * Water and mildew resistant
        > * Ultraviolet protection factor of 50+ blocks 98
        > percent of UV
        > radiation
        > * Brim edge lined with wire to maintain shape
        > * Single cord holds hat in place in the wind at both
        > front and back
        > * "Hydrofil" wicking sweat band
        > * Pocket inside hat

        *** I'm not sure how the Product Description will look
        on the web site but it looks like it runs together
        here.

        >
        >
        >
        > Field Test:
        >
        > The Tilley has gone with me on every outdoor
        > adventure since I
        > received it two months ago. I will describe three
        > outings.
        >
        > Snowshoes on the Pacific Crest
        >
        > Right after receiving my Tilley, I set out to the
        > mountains above Big
        > Bear Lake for a two-day snowshoe. Temperatures under
        > mostly sunny

        ***> skies ranged from 32 degrees F (0 C) at sunrise
        to
        You can omit the word 'degrees'

        > near 70 F (21 C)
        > at about 7,000 feet (2,100 m) elevation. About 75
        > percent of the

        ***> route was covered in up to four feet (1.2 m) of
        I think I would go ahead and say 4 ft or feet, since
        your conversion has the numeral equivalant

        > snow.
        >
        > I immediately appreciated the full brim of the hat
        > as it kept the
        > early morning sun out of my eyes. I was pleased to
        > find that the hat
        > provided just the right amount of warmth while
        > hiking in the cool
        > air. Encountering a light breeze atop a ridge, the
        > hat stayed on well
        > with the cord just secured at the back of my head.
        > When the wind
        > picked up a bit on steeper slopes, I used the cord
        > under my chin as
        > well rather than have to chase the hat down the
        > hill. As the day
        > warmed, and the climb on snowy slopes became
        > steeper, the wicking
        > sweatband and mesh ventilation kept sweat from
        > running down my face,
        > which is unusual for me on these climbs.
        >
        > The hat did a great job of keeping the sun off my
        > face. I did not do
        > as good a job, however, at following the directions
        > saying to still
        > use sunscreen. I received a light sunburn on the
        > lower part of my
        > face, mostly under my chin and nose where the sun
        > reflected off the
        > snow. Even a sharp hat like this cannot make one act

        ***> sharp all time
        Remove 'time' and add 'the'

        > time!
        >
        > Trails are typically constructed with tree branches
        > trimmed for an

        ***> eight-foot (2.5 m) overhead clearance. With all
        Here again use 8 ft or feet.

        > the
        > snow on the
        > ground, I often had to duck to avoid these branches.
        > Sometimes I
        > didn't duck enough, and my head hit said branch. I
        > was worried my hat
        > would be damaged, but it only sustained a light
        > scuff that washed off
        > easily with a bit of water.
        >
        > Canoeing
        >
        > A second trip shortly thereafter took me to Lake
        > Hodges for a half-
        > day canoe trip. The heavy rains we received this
        > year filled the
        > lake, which had been nearly empty for several years.
        > During the dry
        > spell, willow trees grew tall in the lake bed, and
        > those trees are
        > now partially submerged, making for fun paddles amid
        > their branches.
        > The temperature that day was near 85 F (29 C). The
        > elevation is 300
        > feet (100 m).
        >
        > I secured the chin strap snug, applied my sunscreen,
        > and set off. The
        > Tilley AirFlo is so light it's almost unnoticeable
        > on my head. On the

        ***> trip out several low branches tried to knock the
        Need comma between 'out' and 'several'

        > hat
        > off my head, and
        > on the way back a strong wind picked up going
        > through The Narrows. I
        > had no fear that the hat would blow off, without any
        > discomfort or
        > chafing from the chin strap.
        >
        > Pacific Crest Trail Kick Off
        >
        > Visiting Lake Morena near the southern end of the
        > Pacific Crest Trail
        > provided another opportunity to test the Tilley.
        > Arriving at the camp
        > early, I took a mountain bike ride up a dirt road to
        > a ridge
        > overlooking the lake. Heading down at a rather good
        > speed, the hat
        > stayed secure when I used the chin strap. The
        > following evening, a
        > light rain came in and the Tilley kept my head quite
        > dry and warm.
        > More importantly, with 600 hardcore hikers in camp,
        > several of them
        > recognized that, since I was wearing a Tilley, I was
        > a person of
        > character.
        >
        > Next:
        >
        > So far, the Tilley AirFlo keeps my sweaty head cool,
        > still looks
        > good, has repeled a bit of light rain, and hasn't
        > blown away in the
        > wind.
        >
        > The hat will be used on all my hikes during the next
        > several months
        > (and beyond given my love of this hat already).
        > Later this month I
        > will spend a week backpacking the Pacific Crest
        > Trail across the San
        > Gabriel Mountains, with elevations between 3,000 and
        > 9,000 feet (900
        > to 2,700 m). Later this summer I plan a backpack in
        > the Sierra Nevada
        > north of with elevations up to 10,000 feet (3,000
        > m). The weather

        ***> could be anything from a warm and dry 90 degrees
        F
        Omit 'degrees'

        > (32 C) to a
        > pleasant 30 F (-1 C). I expect wind and anticipate
        > rain. During this
        > test I will look at:
        >
        > * Ventilation: I crank out a lot of heat and often
        > find myself
        > removing my hat to fan the sweat from my head. As
        > the summer warms
        > up, will the Tilley still keep me cool and dry?
        >
        > * Appearance and Comfort: Will the hat maintain it's
        > style so I don't
        > look like a vagrant when I hike into town?
        >
        > * Guaranteed for Life: As this hat will be drafted
        > for use on all my
        > outings for the next four months, it will experience
        > the worst I can
        > give it. My hats get stuffed in my backpack, stuffed
        > in the back of
        > my pants, and used to hold loose items in my tent.
        > Will the seams
        > stay tight? Will the fabric fray? Will I outlast the
        > hat?
        >
        > * Floats: An interesting claim. I do wear my hat
        > when I visit a sunny
        > swimming hole, so this claim will also be tested.
        >
        > * Repels rain: While some moisture can be expected
        > to enter the mesh
        > or grommets, how well does the hat keep my face and
        > glasses dry? Do
        > the brims sag as they get soaked? Does the hat dry
        > quickly, or will
        > it be a soggy mat upon my head? Does the hat fit
        > comfortably under
        > the hood of my raincoat?
        >
        > * Won't shrink: Does the preshrunk fabric really
        > work as claimed?
        >
        > * Anti-sweat band: Yeah, right. Again, as summer
        > approaches, will the
        > band really pick up sweat from my forehead and move
        > it to my temple
        > area for evaporation without it running down my
        > face?
        >
        > * Cleaning: How well does the fabric resist stains?
        > Does it dry
        > quickly after washing? Do the instructions for
        > removing wrinkles work
        > (on the hat, not my forehead)?

        Good report Bill! Very informative. If you would
        upload on of these to the test folder I would like to
        see it there before you upload to the site. Let me
        know when you do this so we can get it uploaded to the
        site. Thank you again.



        Chuck Carnes



        __________________________________
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        Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new Resources site
        http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/resources/
      • AsABat
        My responses are included below. Most of the edits were not made as ... ###RESPONSE: This second paragraph is not so much the biography but more a description
        Message 3 of 6 , May 31 8:43 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          My responses are included below. Most of the edits were not made as
          they are matters of style. See below:


          --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, Chuck Carnes
          <ctcarnes1@y...> wrote:

          > > I really do not like to wear hats, but I have no
          > > choice. My eyes are
          > > extremely sensitive to light, so I have a collection
          > > of mostly cheap
          > > hats I wear whenever I spend much time outdoors. For
          > > hiking I use one
          > > of several floppy nylon hats, which become floppier
          > > the longer I wear
          > > them, and give me a rather rag-tag look. Working in
          > > the yard it is
          > > usually a larger straw lifeguard hat. Of course, I
          > > have an extensive
          > > collection of baseball caps picked up at various
          > > events, none of
          > > which shield my eyes when the sun is at my side, let
          > > alone protect my
          > > ears from sunburn.
          >
          > *** This gets to be a little bit long. I think BGT
          > wants to see our Personal Biographical stuff to be
          > shorter. See if you can compress this a little.

          ###RESPONSE: This second paragraph is not so much the biography but
          more a description of my use and attitude towards hats. I think it
          adds to the reader's understanding of my report.

          > > This is the second of three reports of the Tilley
          > > LTM6 Airflo Hat
          > > based on use over the last two months. The first
          > > report described the
          >
          > ***> socks in detail.
          > I think you ment to say 'hat'

          ###RESPONSE: Uh, yeah, hat! Corrected.


          > *** I'm not sure how the Product Description will look
          > on the web site but it looks like it runs together
          > here.

          ###RESPONSE: It's an Unordered List (UL) on the web. Yahoo makes a
          mess of it here.

          > ***> skies ranged from 32 degrees F (0 C) at sunrise
          > to
          > You can omit the word 'degrees'

          ###RESPONSE: I write my reports in a conversational style, and would
          use the word "degrees" in conversation. The "F" and the conversion in
          parentheses are included for international readers.

          > > near 70 F (21 C)
          > > at about 7,000 feet (2,100 m) elevation. About 75
          > > percent of the
          >
          > ***> route was covered in up to four feet (1.2 m) of
          > I think I would go ahead and say 4 ft or feet, since
          > your conversion has the numeral equivalant

          ###RESPONSE: Style.

          > > snow. Even a sharp hat like this cannot make one act
          >
          > ***> sharp all time
          > Remove 'time' and add 'the'
          >
          > > time!

          ###RESPONSE: Corrected.

          > ***> eight-foot (2.5 m) overhead clearance. With all
          > Here again use 8 ft or feet.

          ###RESPONSE: Style.

          > ***> trip out several low branches tried to knock the
          > Need comma between 'out' and 'several'

          ###RESPONSE: Added to avoid restarting the comma wars!

          > ***> could be anything from a warm and dry 90 degrees
          > F
          > Omit 'degrees'

          ###RESPONSE: Style - see above.

          >
          > Good report Bill! Very informative. If you would
          > upload on of these to the test folder I would like to
          > see it there before you upload to the site. Let me
          > know when you do this so we can get it uploaded to the
          > site. Thank you again.


          ###RESPONSE: It's in the test folder now. Let me know when I can
          upload to the permanent location. (Hint: My links won't work in the
          test folder because I use relative links rather than absolute.)

          Bill
        • Shane Steinkamp
          I tried to work on it tonight, and almost made it. Neither one of my daughters is too happy with their new situation tonight it seems... I should have it
          Message 4 of 6 , May 31 9:03 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            I tried to work on it tonight, and almost made it. Neither one of my
            daughters is too happy with their new situation tonight it seems... I
            should have it finished in a day or two. Very sorry for the delay.

            Shane
          • Coy
            ... know the feeling...different issues, same results. I hope I get mine in tonight. got to get conversions put in, reread, spell check etc. If not I ll giter
            Message 5 of 6 , May 31 9:23 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Shane Steinkamp"
              <shane@t...> wrote:
              > I tried to work on it tonight, and almost made it. Neither one of my
              > daughters is too happy with their new situation tonight it seems... I
              > should have it finished in a day or two. Very sorry for the delay.
              >
              > Shane

              know the feeling...different issues, same results. I hope I get mine
              in tonight. got to get conversions put in, reread, spell check etc.
              If not I'll giter done sometime tomorrow.

              Coy Boy
            • Chuck Carnes
              Thanks Bill for your responses. The main thing I was looking for as far as the temperature thing was consistancy. I just think if you are going to put degrees
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 1, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                Thanks Bill for your responses. The main thing I was
                looking for as far as the temperature thing was
                consistancy. I just think if you are going to put
                degrees on some of them it should go on all of them.
                But if it is a style thing then that is okay by me.

                The html version looks good and like you said, the
                "first report" is not clickable. You may upload when
                ready.

                --- AsABat <wjj2001@...> wrote:
                > My responses are included below. Most of the edits
                > were not made as
                > they are matters of style. See below:
                >
                >
                > --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, Chuck
                > Carnes
                > <ctcarnes1@y...> wrote:
                >
                > > > I really do not like to wear hats, but I have no
                > > > choice. My eyes are
                > > > extremely sensitive to light, so I have a
                > collection
                > > > of mostly cheap
                > > > hats I wear whenever I spend much time outdoors.
                > For
                > > > hiking I use one
                > > > of several floppy nylon hats, which become
                > floppier
                > > > the longer I wear
                > > > them, and give me a rather rag-tag look. Working
                > in
                > > > the yard it is
                > > > usually a larger straw lifeguard hat. Of course,
                > I
                > > > have an extensive
                > > > collection of baseball caps picked up at various
                > > > events, none of
                > > > which shield my eyes when the sun is at my side,
                > let
                > > > alone protect my
                > > > ears from sunburn.
                > >
                > > *** This gets to be a little bit long. I think BGT
                > > wants to see our Personal Biographical stuff to be
                > > shorter. See if you can compress this a little.
                >
                > ###RESPONSE: This second paragraph is not so much
                > the biography but
                > more a description of my use and attitude towards
                > hats. I think it
                > adds to the reader's understanding of my report.
                >
                > > > This is the second of three reports of the
                > Tilley
                > > > LTM6 Airflo Hat
                > > > based on use over the last two months. The first
                > > > report described the
                > >
                > > ***> socks in detail.
                > > I think you ment to say 'hat'
                >
                > ###RESPONSE: Uh, yeah, hat! Corrected.
                >
                >
                > > *** I'm not sure how the Product Description will
                > look
                > > on the web site but it looks like it runs together
                > > here.
                >
                > ###RESPONSE: It's an Unordered List (UL) on the web.
                > Yahoo makes a
                > mess of it here.
                >
                > > ***> skies ranged from 32 degrees F (0 C) at
                > sunrise
                > > to
                > > You can omit the word 'degrees'
                >
                > ###RESPONSE: I write my reports in a conversational
                > style, and would
                > use the word "degrees" in conversation. The "F" and
                > the conversion in
                > parentheses are included for international readers.
                >
                > > > near 70 F (21 C)
                > > > at about 7,000 feet (2,100 m) elevation. About
                > 75
                > > > percent of the
                > >
                > > ***> route was covered in up to four feet (1.2 m)
                > of
                > > I think I would go ahead and say 4 ft or feet,
                > since
                > > your conversion has the numeral equivalant
                >
                > ###RESPONSE: Style.
                >
                > > > snow. Even a sharp hat like this cannot make one
                > act
                > >
                > > ***> sharp all time
                > > Remove 'time' and add 'the'
                > >
                > > > time!
                >
                > ###RESPONSE: Corrected.
                >
                > > ***> eight-foot (2.5 m) overhead clearance. With
                > all
                > > Here again use 8 ft or feet.
                >
                > ###RESPONSE: Style.
                >
                > > ***> trip out several low branches tried to knock
                > the
                > > Need comma between 'out' and 'several'
                >
                > ###RESPONSE: Added to avoid restarting the comma
                > wars!
                >
                > > ***> could be anything from a warm and dry 90
                > degrees
                > > F
                > > Omit 'degrees'
                >
                > ###RESPONSE: Style - see above.
                >
                > >
                > > Good report Bill! Very informative. If you would
                > > upload on of these to the test folder I would like
                > to
                > > see it there before you upload to the site. Let me
                > > know when you do this so we can get it uploaded to
                > the
                > > site. Thank you again.
                >
                >
                > ###RESPONSE: It's in the test folder now. Let me
                > know when I can
                > upload to the permanent location. (Hint: My links
                > won't work in the
                > test folder because I use relative links rather than
                > absolute.)
                >
                > Bill
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >

                Chuck Carnes



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