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REPOST OR Snowline Mitts - Field Report - Ed Morse

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  • Edwin Morse
    REPOST OR Snowline Mitts - Ed Morse ATTN: Thomas Vickers, Here is my next attempt. I appreciate your patience in pushing me to do the best possible. The HTML
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1, 2007
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      REPOST OR Snowline Mitts - Ed Morse

      ATTN: Thomas Vickers,

      Here is my next attempt. I appreciate your patience in pushing me to
      do the best possible.

      The HTML is in the TESTS folder and should be found at one of the
      following addresses:


      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/OR%20Snowline%
      20Mitts%20-%20Field%20Report%20-%20Ed%20Morse/#FRPT


      http://tinyurl.com/yp4vlm

      Following is just the Field Report text, as you asked. The only EDIT
      you had for me was an oversight and I got that fixed. The TITLE line
      I changed as per instructions from Shane.
      I changed most of the Edits and comments you had. I could not see a
      way to add the dates in the other places you suggested and I don't
      think they are needed.
      I could be convinced.

      Ed M

      <a name="FRPT">FIELD REPORT</a>

      FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS


      During the Field Test period I have worn the Snowline Mitts for trail
      work, hiking, XC skiing and snowshoeing. The weather has varied from
      cool and rainy to snowy to cold and very windy. We finally got enough
      snow for good skiing and snowshoeing, though still less than normal.
      Generally I was out about every other day just to enjoy winter. When
      doing trail work the temperature was generally between 30 F (-1 C)
      and 45 F (7 C). When I was hiking the temperature was generally right
      around freezing (32 F or 0 C). When I was skiing or snowshoeing the
      temperature was mostly between 8 F (-13 C) and 28 F (-2 C)

      I've used the Mitts in the Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore, which is
      along the shore of Lake Michigan about 30 miles (48 km) west of
      Traverse City, Michigan. I have used the Mitts in the Manistee
      National Forest, which is about 45 miles (72 km) southwest of
      Traverse City, Michigan and extends south about 120 miles (190 km). I
      have also worn the Mitts frequently in the Pere Marquette State
      Forest, which is south, east and northeast of Traverse City.
      Elevations ranged from about 600 feet (183 m) along the Lake Michigan
      shore line up to about 1500 feet (457 m) in parts of the Pere
      Marquette State Forest further inland.

      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

      The Snowline Mitts have performed very well during all my outings for
      the last two months. The waterproof fleece lined Mitts kept my hands
      warm and dry during late December and early January. When it got
      colder in late January, I first tried fleece gloves inside the Mitts.
      Then I changed to fleece mittens under the Mitts. This works better
      for me. After I was barehanded for a few minutes my hands got warm
      quicker by curling my fingers together inside the mittens. When the
      snow finally got deep enough for skiing and snowshoeing I learned to
      keep the top drawstring tight on the Mitts. This kept the snow out of
      the mitts and away from my wrists and hands when I managed to fall.

      I also learned to turn the Mitts inside out when I got back to the
      truck so they could dry. At the end of a day the inside fleece was
      almost always wet from sweat. It doesn't usually take long for the
      Mitts to dry, when turned inside out. If I turn them inside out as
      soon as I get in the truck they are usually dry before I get home.

      I have used the Mitts several times to sit on. This works much better
      when sitting on a log than it does in deep snow. Following are a few
      examples of what my activities with the Mitts and how they have
      worked for me. Note, I carry a digital thermometer so I know the
      temperature.

      I frequently use both my GPS and digital camera when hiking,
      snowshoeing or skiing. The control buttons on both items seem to be
      made for very small fingers. I have to be bare handed and careful
      when I use any of the menu functions.

      In late December 2006, I hiked on the North Country Trail in the
      Manistee National Forest doing trail cleanup. Weather was partly
      cloudy and windy. It was 35 F (2 C) when I started and got up to 44 F
      (7 C). I wore the Mitts to keep my hands warm and dry while moving
      branches off the trail. I only walked about 4 miles (6 km), but
      needed 6 hours cutting and moving branches off the trail. All the
      branches were wet and many were still snow covered. My hands stayed
      warm and dry.

      In early January 2007, I went for a hike in the Sleeping Bear Dunes.
      The temperature was about 29 F (-2 C) all the time I was out that
      day. There was only a light dusting of snow. The sun was bright when
      I started but heavy clouds soon moved in off the lake. Attached to
      the pack shoulder straps was a Garmin 60C GPS, a compass/digital
      thermometer and a camera. After about the first 10 minutes my hands
      were warm except when I took the Mitts off, which was necessary every
      time I used the GPS. The buttons on the GPS are too small to use when
      wearing gloves or mittens. I have to be bare handed to operate the
      buttons. The Mitts worked great using the hiking poles, the Mitts
      are flexible enough I can work them into the wrist straps for good
      control. There was no problem checking the compass and thermometer
      wearing the Mitts.
      When I decided to start back, I used the GPS to get a bearing and
      distance to the truck. I got back to the truck at 5:10 PM, before
      sundown but already getting dark. I was frequently using the GPS for
      directions and other information. I used the Mitts to sit on twice
      when I stopped to rest, drink and check the GPS for direction. When I
      wear the Mitts this is less fuss than carrying a pad to sit on. It
      generally takes about 10 minutes for my hands to get warm again after
      having the Mitts off. This was a comparatively short hike of only
      about 7 miles (11 km).

      In late January 2007, I went skiing at Sand Lakes Quiet Area, in the
      Pere Marquette State Forest. The temperature was 9 F (-13 C) when I
      started. I wore the Mitts over fleece mittens. My hands were cold for
      about the first 15 minutes. Then the hills started and I got warm all
      over. I stopped to take pictures three times, each time I had to take
      off the Mitts to use the camera with very small buttons, my hands got
      cold and it took about 10 minutes to get warm again.

      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Skiing at Sand lakes">>
      Skiing at Sand Lake
      It was up to 17 F (-8 C) at that time. The rest of the way I had to
      break my own trail, with 2 more stops for pictures. When I got back
      to the parking area the temperature was down to 12 F (-11 C). Except
      when I stopped for pictures with the Mitts off and the few minutes
      getting warm again, my hands were warm and comfortable, though not
      dry. When I took the Mitts off back at the truck both the inside
      mittens and the inside fleece lining was very wet. Turned inside out,
      they were dry before I got back home.

      In late January 2007, I went skiing at Muncie Lakes, in the Pere
      Marquette State Forest. This trip I used wide Trak Bushwhacker skis
      and went mostly off trail. The temperature was 24 F (-4 C) when I
      started and got up to 28 F (-2 C) by the time I quit. I took a few
      pictures using a Nikon Coolpix L3 and my new Gorilla Pod tripod,
      wrapped on a tree branch and braced on the tree trunk. When I stopped
      for lunch I walked around a lot getting the camera set up. I have to
      use bare hands to set up the camera and tripod. The tripod is 6" (15
      cm) long with flexible legs to wrap around any available support. The
      menu buttons on the camera to set the timer are so small I often push
      the wrong one with bare hands.
      The snow had softened and packed on the bottom of the boots and in
      the bindings when I tried to put the skis back on. It was bare hands
      and pocket knife work to get all the packed snow cleaned out of boots
      and bindings. The pocket knife I carry is a Leatherman Micra, much
      too small to use with any type of hand covering. I have "step in"
      bindings with a small bar on the boot to fit into the bindings. All
      packed or frozen snow in either part must be thoroughly removed.
      The Mitts kept my hands warm and worked well to sit on over a wet log
      when I stopped for lunch and pictures.

      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Mitts on log, ready for
      lunch">> mitts on a log, ready for lunch


      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Sitting on Mitts on log">>
      eating lunch, sitting on the Mitts

      In early February 2007, I went skiing at Sand Lakes, in the Pere
      Marquette State Forest. There was about 5" (13 cm) of new snow on
      older tracks. The Temperature stayed at 24 F (-4 C ) until I quit at
      6 PM (almost too dark to see the trail). It was snowing fairly hard
      the last 2 hours. I wore the Mitts over fleece mittens. I managed to
      take one picture with the camera mounted on the Gorilla Pod wrapped
      around branches of a small pine. My hands got cold playing around
      with the camera and timer.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Almost got in place">>

      Everything functioned well. The fleece mittens inside the Snowline
      Mitts were very warm but both Mitts and added mitten liners were wet
      from sweat when I got back to the truck. It is necessary to remove
      the fleece mittens and turn the Snowlines inside out when I am
      finished for the day. Otherwise they will take several days to dry,
      if not turned inside out.

      In mid February 2007, I went skiing on the North Country Trail in
      the Manistee National Forest. This trip I was exploring a potential
      trail reroute and learning to use the track feature of the Garmin
      60C. I wore the Snowline Mitts over fleece gloves, and soon took off
      the fleece gloves. The temperature got up above 44 F (7 C) with
      bright sunlight, when in the open. I was much too warm, but I kept
      on the Mitts in case I fell. I did not want snow on my hands and
      wrists.
      I skied 5 miles (8 km) of existing and proposed trails in 5 hours and
      30 minutes. Most of the distance was unbroken trail with soft wet
      snow. About one mile (1.6 km) was old snowshoe tracks 3 of us had
      left several days earlier doing preliminary exploration. The Snowline
      Mitts kept my hands warm even though I was up to my elbows in snow a
      few times when I fell. I have learned to keep the upper cord of the
      Mitts tight to keep the snow out. I stopped twice for pictures and
      several times to use the GPS.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Skiing on the NCT">>

      Skiing on the NCT
      Again I don't have the Mitts on because the camera self timer doesn't
      allow that much time. I did put them on as soon as I had the camera
      put away.

      SUMMARY

      I am very happy with the Snowline Mitts. The long gauntlet style
      wrists add extra warmth, with the top pulltab tightened snow can not
      get in to make my hands and wrists cold. I like the flexibility to
      wear, or not wear, other mittens inside the Snowline Mitts. This
      allows use of the Mitts in a much wider range of temperatures and
      conditions.

      I cannot put on snowshoes or take them off with the Mitts on, since I
      can't loosen or adjust the bindings with the Mitts on. I can put on
      and take off skis with the Mitts on unless I get snow packed in the
      ski bindings. It is just a little difficult to get the Mitts into the
      ski pole wrist loops but the added control is worth the effort. As
      two of the pictures show, I usually leave the Mitts in the pole wrist
      straps when I need to do something barehanded.

      The best thing about the Mitts is that they are truly waterproof.
      They don't get wet from outside but the fleece lining nearly always
      gets very wet from my sweaty hands. Even wet and sweaty my hands stay
      warm down to about 25 F (-4 C). Below that I need to add fleece
      mittens inside to be comfortable. Fortunately I can turn them inside
      out and they get dry fairly soon.

      On the other hand, the worst thing about the Mitts is that they
      really are waterproof. Have I stated often enough that I must turn
      the Mitts inside out when I quit for the day? When I forgot to do
      this early in the testing the Mitts were still wet inside the next
      day.
      I have worn a variety of gloves and mittens for winter activities in
      past years. My hands were frequently cold and often wet. I prefer my
      hands to be warm and sweaty wet rather than cold and wet. I may well
      be a permanent convert to the Snowline Mitts.

      I would like to thank BGT and OR Gear for giving me the opportunity
      to test the Snowline Mitts.

      This concludes my Field Report. The Long Term Report will be added in
      about two months.



      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2007. All rights reserved.
    • redroachhome
      Ed, I am going to go ahead and tell you to update and upload. Thank you for being so helpful and patient. TV
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 5, 2007
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        Ed, I am going to go ahead and tell you to update and upload.
        Thank you for being so helpful and patient.

        TV
      • Edwin Morse
        Thanks TV, It will be done within a few hours. You were the patient and helpful one. If there a folder to upload to or is it obvious? Ed M _____ From:
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 5, 2007
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          Thanks TV,

          It will be done within a few hours. You were the patient and helpful one.



          If there a folder to upload to or is it obvious?



          Ed M





          _____

          From: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of redroachhome
          Sent: Monday, March 05, 2007 12:04 PM
          To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [backpackgeartesters] Edited: REPOST OR Snowline Mitts - Field
          Report - Ed Morse



          Ed, I am going to go ahead and tell you to update and upload.
          Thank you for being so helpful and patient.

          TV





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Thomas Vickers
          I think it is obvious. You may need to delete the old report and remember to upload in combined format TV
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 5, 2007
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            I think it is obvious.
            You may need to delete the old report and remember to upload in combined
            format

            TV
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