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LONG-TERM REPORT - MSR CloudLiner - Andrew Priest

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  • Andrew Priest
    Dear Andrew Please find below my MSR CloudLiner Hydration Bag Long-term Report. The HTML copy can be found at
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 1, 2007
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      Dear Andrew

      Please find below my MSR CloudLiner Hydration Bag
      Long-term Report. The HTML copy can be found at
      <http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/Andrew_-_MSR_CloudLiner_Long-term_Report/>.

      The report is dated as per the due date and
      reflects my testing up to the that point.

      Thanks
      Andrew Priest



      MSR CLOUDLINER HYDRATION BAG
      Long-term Report
      October 10, 2006

      Authored by

      Andrew Priest
      Perth, Western Australia, Australia
      aushiker@...

      TABLE OF CONTENTS

      *Product Details and Specifications
      * Tester's Details
      +Personal Biography
      +Testing Playground
      +Testing Environment
      *Long-term Report

      Andrew, the tester:

      I am a 46 year old male, 180 cm (5' 11") in
      height, I weigh 111 kg (245 lb). I have been
      bushwalking in Western Australia for
      approximately five years. For the past four years
      I have been regularly walking and leading on and
      off-track pack carries with the Perth Bushwalkers
      Club and more recently I have also got into
      geocaching. I consider myself as moving towards
      being a lightweight tent-carrying bushwalker with
      my pack base weight in the 8 to 12 kg (18 to 26
      lb) range. I have completed my End to End of the
      Bibbulmun Track (2003), the Cape to Cape Track
      (Nov 2001), the Coastal Plains Walk Track
      (numerous times), the Larapinta Trail (July 2005)
      and Fitzgerald River National Park (April 2006).

      I currently use a Platypus Hoser hydration kit
      which has a similar, if not the same bite valve
      design as the MSR CloudLiner Hydration Bag being tested here.

      [Click here to return to the top]

      Andrew's testing playground:

      The bushwalking environment of the south-west of
      Western Australia allows for bushwalks and
      backpacking from coastal plains to forest.
      Elevation ranges from 0 to 585 metres (0 to 1,920
      feet). Within this region, I walk in varying
      conditions from forestry roads, to sandy tracks
      to single-purpose walking trails, to rock
      hopping, to beach walking to completely off-track
      walking through open and dense country.

      [Click here to return to the top]

      The testing environment:

      During the summer period, daytime temperatures
      average 30° C (86° F), whereas from March through
      to December the daytime average temperatures
      range from 15° C to 26° C (59° F to 79° F).
      During the autumn, winter, and spring periods the
      normal weather pattern is fairly wet with
      frequent heavy rainstorms evident. It does not
      normally snow in Western Australia.

      According to The Times Atlas of the World
      (Concise Edition - Revised 1997) our weather is
      described as being "Mediterranean - rainy
      climates with mild winters, coolest month above
      0° C (32° F), but below 18° C (64° F); warmest
      month above 10° C (50° F)." The atlas depicts the
      coastal area north of Los Angeles as having the same climate.

      Product Details:

      The MSR CloudLiner Hydration Bag is manufactured
      by Mountain Safety Research (MSR). Year of
      manufacturer is assumed to be 2006. MSR describe
      the CloudLiner as a lightweight version of their
      Hydromedary Hydration Bag. The CloudLiner as
      tested is a 2 litre bladder with a wide filling
      mouth (50 mm / 2") at the top. Attached at the
      bottom of the bag is drinking tube with a bite/shut off valve and a lapel clip.

      [Click here to return to the top]

      Specifications:

      *Manufacturer's specified weight - 2 Litre: 162 g (5.7 oz)
      *My weight - 2 Litre: 164 g (5.8 oz)

      Long-term Report:

      This report should be read in-conjunction with my
      Initial Report and my Field Report.

      During the long-term testing phase of this test
      program I have used the MSR CloudLiner hydration
      bag on an aborted weekend backpack in the Wandoo
      National Park (turned the walk into an off-track
      day-walk) and on a day walk in the Perth hills in
      September 2006. I concluded in my Field Report that the CloudLiner:

      "In summary the CloudLiner has worked well as
      hydration bladder, even if a bit of a fiddle, but
      does not work for me around camp."

      The above statement pretty much sums up my
      experience with the CloudLiner. I am not overly
      impressed with the design and have used better
      designed hydration set-ups and will resort back
      to my current set-up. That is I do not plan to
      continue using the CloudLiner as part of my standard kit.

      My concerns with the design where outlined in
      my Field Report. They are repeated/added to below:

      1. To use the CloudLiner in my Granite Gear
      Stratus Latitude's hydration bladder sleeve I
      have to actually remove the valve and clip from
      the CloudLiner every time I wish to remove it or
      put it in my pack. It should be noted that this
      was not a problem in my day pack as my day pack
      does not have a hydration bladder sleeve. That
      said, as my primary use is backpacking it is a frustrating feature.

      2. I am not overly wrapped in the valve. It has a
      tendency to leak. I have had a similar experience
      with the same valve design on my Platypus kit. I
      find that if I do not "clear" the valve after
      turning it off, I find a gentle dripping of
      water, generally down the front of my shirt. This
      continues to be a problem with the CloudLiner throughout the test.

      3. As the only outlets on the bag are either the
      large hole or the bite valve, I have found it
      quite frustrating around the camp when used as my
      camp water source. It just does not have the
      convenience that comes with designs with a
      cool-drink bottle sized outlet. Try pouring a cup
      of water from a big hole in a full bladder. Again
      this is an issue which continued to bug me
      throughout this test. I found that I was carrying
      a small 600 ml (20 fl oz) cool drink bottle to
      give me flexibility and easy access to water for
      making a cup of tea at lunch time and around camp.

      On the positive side I have had no issues with
      durability; no punctures and the bite valve provides a good flow of water.

      The above not withstanding and the normal issues
      with drying bladders (at least the CloudLiner has
      a large mouth so it is easier to clean) the
      CloudLiner is functioning okay, has survived okay
      in my pack and is a handy 2 litre (2 US Quarts)
      size, however its lack of a pouring point makes
      it use around camp too frustrating for me to
      continue to use it on a regular basis.

      My thanks to BackpackGearTest.org and Mountain
      Safety Research (MSR) for being able to participate in this test.

      [Click here to return to the top]
    • a_henrichs
      Hey Andrew, Great report. I only noticed a couple of small edits. Feel free to upload after you correct them. Andy EDIT: Both of your Field Report links
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 2, 2007
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        Hey Andrew,
        Great report. I only noticed a couple of small edits. Feel free to
        upload after you correct them.

        Andy

        EDIT: Both of your Field Report links connects back to the top of the
        Long-Term Report.

        > My concerns with the design where outlined in my Field Report.
        EDIT: "where" should be "were"
      • Andrew Priest
        ... Thanks. All fixed. Had to fix the Field Report which was labelled Long-term Report. Regards Andrew
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 2, 2007
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          At 11:54 AM 3/01/2007, you wrote:
          >Hey Andrew,
          > Great report. I only noticed a couple of small edits. Feel free to
          >upload after you correct them.

          Thanks. All fixed. Had to fix the Field Report which was labelled
          Long-term Report.

          Regards
          Andrew
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