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INITIAL REPORT: Kayland Contact 1000 Hiking Boots - Adam G. Fisher

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  • Adam
    Kayland Contact 1000 Boots Initial Report November 28, 2006 Name: Adam G. Fisher Age: 34 Gender: Male Height: 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) Weight: 255 lb (116 kg) Email:
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 28, 2006
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      Kayland Contact 1000 Boots
      Initial Report
      November 28, 2006

      Name: Adam G. Fisher
      Age: 34
      Gender: Male
      Height: 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
      Weight: 255 lb (116 kg)
      Email: agfisher (at) yahoo (dot) com
      City: Medford, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

      ------
      Backpacking Background:

      I have been hiking and backpacking since I joined the Scouts in the
      early eighties. Most trip, these days, are overnight with a long
      weekend thrown in whenever possible. My full pack weight can range
      from a light 25 lbs (11 kg) to a standard 50 lbs (23 kg) to an extreme
      high of 75 lbs (34 kg) but the standard weight is my average for most
      trips. I also try to day hike whenever I can squeeze them in. Recently
      I have hiked in Australia (Alice Springs, Tasmania), New Zealand
      (Nelson, Wellington), England (North Yorkshire Moors), Germany
      (Bavaria) and Massachusetts. During the year I like to backpack, hike,
      bike, ski and snowboard as much as possible.

      ------
      Product Information:

      Product: Kayland Contact 1000 Hiking Boots
      Size: 13 US, 12 UK
      Manufacturer: Kayland
      Year of Manufacture: 2006
      Color: Black/Gray/Orange
      Weight (Listed): 1 lb 10 oz (750 g)
      Measured Weight: 2 lb (907 g)
      URL: http://www.kayland.com/
      MSRP: NA on company website

      ------
      Product Description:

      The boots arrived in a brown cardboard box. Inside was a shoebox that
      securely held the boots in place. Printed on the bottom of the shoebox
      is a set of care instructions for the boots. Inside the shoebox was
      the pair of boots wrapped in some packing paper. After giving the
      boots a quick look over, they seemed to be free from defects and
      damage incurred during shipping.

      After doing some research on Kayland's website I learned about the
      material and technologies involved in the construction of these boots.
      Starting from the bottom up, the boot's sole are the Foura by Vibram.
      According to the Vibram website this soles offers "Unique design and
      placement of lugs provide maximum traction on various terrain.
      Multi-directional lugs provide user with substantial edging
      capabilities for braking, push off, and stability." The tread's lugs
      do appear to be aggressive in their design. Above the Vibram sole is
      the midsole. This is constructed, according to the Kayland website, of
      "Shock Absorber Microporous + I.A.D.S." The I.A.D.S part assists in
      the protecting and supporting of the heel while also increasing
      stability and forward thrust during activities. The Shock Absorber
      Microporous element helps reduce the overall impact of the boot. The
      next level is the uppers. By looking at the Kayland website the uppers
      are constructed from "SUEDE 1.6/1.8 mm + BREATHABLE MATERIAL IN HIGH
      RESISTENT FIBERS." The uppers are designed, according to Kayland, to
      increase foot comfort by 50% and enhance their ability to transfer
      energy, which improves safety and performance. The boot's lining is
      constructed of eVent fabric. This fabric claims to aid in the
      dispersion of perspiration during use.

      The boot's appearance, overall, is quite nice. They have a very modern
      and smooth look. The boots are colored black on the bottom with grey
      encircling the top from the ankle up. As accents, on the side, tongue
      and a small section of the sole a bit of orange has been added.
      Inside, the liner is of a light grey color and the material has a mesh
      like appearance. The included shoelaces are a cylindrical braided
      black cord with subtle white highlights replacing the more familiar
      flat woven shoelaces. Flat shoelaces usually have the ability to
      remain tied. The boot's tongue is attached to both side of the boot
      all the way up to the top. This feature should help significantly in
      keeping the boots dry in wet conditions.

      One interesting design feature is the placement of the shoelace
      grommets. They are arranged in an asymmetrically pattern with five
      metal loop type grommets on the outside of the foot and four on the
      inside. Below this in single offset leather loop that has been placed
      on the toe to maximize the force applied to the area. At the top of
      the boot are six speed-lacing hooks. The lower two, one on each side,
      are placed low and near the ankle. This position really lets you pull
      the top of the boot down onto the top of your foot, making for a
      comfortably tight fit. The other four hooks are above the ankle and
      let you tighten the boot around the lower leg.

      Using a pair of thin hiking socks I put on the boots and tightened
      them comfortably around my foot. The first thing I noticed when
      standing was my height. These boots really make me feel taller. The
      distance from the bottom of the sole to the top of the boots insole is
      1.75 in (4.45 cm). This does not seem to be that great so maybe the
      feeling is a bit misleading because they are new. After standing I
      took a few steps around the room and my next thought was the weight.
      These boots are definitely a bit on the heavy side but not too the
      point where the weight would increase my fatigue. I then tried to move
      my foot around inside the boot to determine how snug the fit is.
      Starting at the toes, I was able to move my toes a comfortable amount.
      They felt well placed and did not slide around striking the sides. The
      top of my foot felt secured and comfortable. Holding the heel of my
      boot and pulling down I tried to determine how much movement I could
      get in heel slip. I pleased to see very little movement which will be
      great to help prevent blisters, etc. Inside the boot I could feel that
      the padding, especially around the ankle had been shaped to hold your
      foot in place. This was good to see as the website stated (as noted
      above) that the boots are designed to hold your foot more securely to
      assist in the transfer of energy. After some short walks in the boots
      I noticed that these boots were much stiffer then the boots I normally
      use but the stiffness give a very supportive feeling. According to
      Kayland's website the boots are rated at a stiffness level of five.
      This scale ranges from Level One, which is a bare foot, to a Level
      Nine, which is extreme mountaineering, glaciers, ice climbing, etc.
      Overall I am very happy with the fit of these boots, I enjoy how the
      boot feel very snug and comfortable almost like they were custom made
      for my foot.

      ------
      Field Information:

      I plan to use the Contact 1000 boots in all my hiking and backpacking
      during the test period. The hiking will occur predominately in the New
      England area weekly. In this area the temperature will range from 55
      F (12.8 C) down to 10 F (12.2 C) or so. Weather condition will cover
      the gambit from sunny and cool to wet and freezing.

      I also plan on using them for a backpacking trip to the southwest
      United States (Arizona, New Mexico) in February. This trip has not
      been completely planned yet but should be for a few days at the least.
      I should have the exact dates after the New Year.

      ------
      Test Plan:

      Below are the questions I plan on answering at this point. As with
      most tests, I'm sure more questions will be determined during the
      process and they will be added.

      The Fit
      - How well do these boots fit with different weight socks?
      o This is important to me because I like to adjust my sock weight
      depending on the outdoor temperature. A pair of boots should be
      comfortable with thin or thick socks.
      - How comfortable can I get the boot while keeping them tight enough
      to not diminish performance?
      o I like the have my boot nice and tight so as to really feel the
      trail while I'm hiking. This for me is very important for safety and
      enjoyment. I will mark a pair of boots down if by tightening then so
      the performance is acceptable my foot becomes uncomfortable and
      cramps. Does the atypical lacing style help in this?
      - Is there enough arch support to keep me hiking all day long?

      Appearance
      - Although not critical to the boots overall, the appearance is
      important to a lot of people. Do these boots look great or are they
      something you want to cover with some gators?

      Quality
      - After a few miles how are the boots holding up?
      o I am curious as to how long the treads last. They feel quite hard so
      will that equate directly to longevity? Also it seems that the joints
      between the sole and upper are glued. How well will this glue joint
      hold up? How well will the foam lining last? Will it keep my foot
      comfortable after some hard use?
      - How easy are they to clean?

      Use
      - Do the boots tire my feet out?
      o Is the cushioning thick enough to reduce the impact stress on my feet?
      o Does the cushioning chaff my feet at all?
      o Do the boots weight too much?
      - How quickly do these boots break in?

      Performance
      - Traction!
      o How do they do with dry packed dirt?
      o How do they do with wet packed dirt?
      o How do they do with dry pavement?
      o How do they do with wet pavement?
      o How do they do with mud? The boots have deep lugs. Do I have to
      stop all the time to clean them out?
      o How do they do with snow?
      o How do they do with ice?
      - Are the boots waterproof? If not how weather proof are they? The
      tongue design makes me thing that they should perform pretty well.
      - Do they keep my feet warm when wet?
      - How quickly do they dry when wet?
      - How well do the boots breathe?
      o My feet can sweat a lot. Can these boots keep up?
    • Exec
      Adam, Thanks for your very easy to edit IR - no spelling or grammar errors. Only three minors changes are needed and one VERY big edit per the recent list
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 30, 2006
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        Adam,

        Thanks for your very easy to edit IR - no spelling or grammar errors. Only three minors changes are needed and one VERY big edit per the recent list discussion on Test Plans in reports.

        First the little things:

        You have an extra "bullet" in the HTML version in the test folder under "weight" in the Product Description;

        You use "you" and "your" in several places. This is "projecting" and needs to be replaced with first person (me, mine) to reflect personal experience.

        Per the recent (today) discussions on the mailing list about test plans/future conditions etc. in test reports, I suggest that you delete (yeah, I know how long you worked on it) the field conditions and test plan portion of your IR. Your product description and pictures are very complete and are quite sufficient for this IR. As Jerry Goller said, this is a style issue so "If you want to put one in your IR, and can make the rest of the report read well, feel free."

        When you finish the above edits, go ahead and delete your file from the test folder and upload to the proper folder.

        Thanks,
        John Waters


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Adam Fisher
        To anyone that can help me, I finished updating my IR for the Kayland Contact 1000 and deleted the test version from the test folder. I went to upload the new
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 1, 2006
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          To anyone that can help me,

          I finished updating my IR for the Kayland Contact 1000 and deleted the test
          version from the test folder. I went to upload the new files into the
          proper folder and I didn't find my name. Should I upload it into the one
          available folder? I believe what happened was since I replaced an original
          tester the folders name is still for the original tester. So what should I
          do?

          Adam Fisher

          On 11/30/06, Exec <exec@...> wrote:
          >
          > Adam,
          >
          > Thanks for your very easy to edit IR - no spelling or grammar errors. Only
          > three minors changes are needed and one VERY big edit per the recent list
          > discussion on Test Plans in reports.
          >
          > First the little things:
          >
          > You have an extra "bullet" in the HTML version in the test folder under
          > "weight" in the Product Description;
          >
          > You use "you" and "your" in several places. This is "projecting" and needs
          > to be replaced with first person (me, mine) to reflect personal experience.
          >
          > Per the recent (today) discussions on the mailing list about test
          > plans/future conditions etc. in test reports, I suggest that you delete
          > (yeah, I know how long you worked on it) the field conditions and test plan
          > portion of your IR. Your product description and pictures are very complete
          > and are quite sufficient for this IR. As Jerry Goller said, this is a style
          > issue so "If you want to put one in your IR, and can make the rest of the
          > report read well, feel free."
          >
          > When you finish the above edits, go ahead and delete your file from the
          > test folder and upload to the proper folder.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > John Waters
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • rayestrella1
          ... Hi Adam, I swapped the names out, you are listed on the folder name now. Ray
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 1, 2006
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            --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Adam Fisher"
            <agfisher@...> wrote:
            >
            > To anyone that can help me,

            Hi Adam,

            I swapped the names out, you are listed on the folder name now.

            Ray
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