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LONG_TERM REPORT:> Big Sky Products Evolution 1P - Andrew Priest

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  • Andrew Priest
    Dear Christine Please find below my Big Sky International Evolution IP long-term report for your editing review. You will find the HTML copy at
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 3, 2006
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      Dear Christine

      Please find below my Big Sky International
      Evolution IP long-term report for your editing
      review. You will find the HTML copy at
      <http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/Andrew-LTR_BSI_Evolution_1P>.

      Thanks
      Andrew



      Big Sky International Evolution 1P
      Long-term Report
      June 27, 2006

      Evolution 1P pitched at Spice Brook, Julimar
      Conservation Reserve. You can see the low-intensity bushfire in the background.

      Authored by

      Andrew Priest
      Perth, Western Australia, Australia
      aushiker@...

      TABLE OF CONTENTS

      * Product Details and Specifications
      * Testers Details
      + Personal Biography
      + Testing Playground
      + Testing Environment
      * Long-term Report

      Andrew, the tester:

      I am a 46 year old male, 180 cm (5' 11") in
      height, I weigh 104 kg (229 lbs). I have been
      bushwalking in Western Australia for
      approximately five years. For the past four years
      I have been regularly walking and leading on and
      off-track pack carries with the Perth Bushwalkers
      Club and more recently I have also got into
      geocaching. I consider myself as moving towards
      being a lightweight tent-carrying bushwalker with
      my pack base weight in the 8 to 12 kg (18 to 26
      lb) range. I have completed my End to End of the
      Bibbulmun Track (2003), the Cape to Cape Track
      (Nov 2001), the Coastal Plains Walk Track
      (numerous times), the Larapinta Trail (July 2005)
      and Fitzgerald River National Park (April 2006).

      [Click here to return to the top]

      Andrew's testing playground:

      The bushwalking environment of the south-west of
      Western Australia allows for bushwalks and
      backpacking from coastal plains to forest.
      Elevation ranges from 0 to 585 metres (0 to 1,920
      feet). Within this region, I walk in varying
      conditions from forestry roads, to sandy tracks
      to single-purpose walking trails, to rock
      hopping, to beach walking to completely off-track
      walking through open and dense country.

      [Click here to return to the top] The testing environment:

      During the summer period, daytime temperatures
      average 30° C (86° F), whereas from March through
      to December the daytime average temperatures
      range from 15° C to 26° C (59° F to 79° F).
      During the autumn, winter, and spring periods the
      normal weather pattern is fairly wet with
      frequent heavy rainstorms evident. It does not
      normally snow in Western Australia.

      According to The Times Atlas of the World
      (Concise Edition - Revised 1997) our weather is
      described as being "Mediterranean - rainy
      climates with mild winters, coolest month above
      0° C (32° F), but below 18° C (64° F); warmest
      month above 10° C (50° F)." The atlas depicts the
      coastal area north of Los Angeles as having the same climate.

      Product Details:

      The 2006 Big Sky International Evolution 1P
      Shelter is a three season free-standing
      lightweight double wall single person tent with a
      single entrance. The rain fly and floor is made
      of Silnylon. The inner is made of no-see-um mesh.
      The significant feature of the Evolution 1P is
      its length, 213 cm (84"). Its peak height is 99
      cm (39"). It has a single vestibule on the same
      side as the entrance to the tent. There is also a
      small window on the foot end of the tent. Within
      the tent has an small pocket on one side and a
      larger pocket, referred to as a clothes hamper by
      the manufacturer on the other side.

      [Click here to return to the top]

      Specifications:

      * Manufacturer's specified weight: The
      manufacturer gives a weight of 1.02 kg (2lbs 4
      oz) for the shelter, fly and carbon poles and
      1.16 kg (2lbs 9 oz) for the shelter, fly and aluminium poles.
      * My weight is reported for the configuration
      that I carry the tent in, i.e., stuff sack, rain
      fly, inner and poles. At the time of writing the
      titanium stakes have yet to be shipped. This
      weight will be adjusted once they are received.
      + With carbon poles - 1.08 kg (2 lbs 6 oz)
      + With aluminium poles - 1.20 kg (2 lbs 10 oz)
      * For those interested or who wish to make up
      their own combination of components, the individual weights are:
      + Stuff sack - 34 g (1.2 oz)
      + Fly or outer - 370 g (13 oz)
      + Inner - 461 g (1 lb)
      + Aluminium poles - 336 g (12 oz)
      + Carbon poles - 212 g (7.5 oz)
      + Titanium stakes - NA
      + Guy ropes - NA

      Long-term Report:

      Having used the Evolution 1P for nine nights, I
      am a happy chappie. Sure I have my bug points
      with this tent, but the good points outweigh the
      bugs as I see it. I like this tent, I feel good
      about taking it with me in my backpack. Well done Big Sky Products.

      Testing during the Long-term phase of this test
      has been limited to two nights in the Wandoo
      country north-east of Perth. The Evolution 1P
      was used overnight on a bushwalk in the Julimar
      Conservation Reserve, May 13 & 14, 2006. We
      camped on the banks of Spice Brook with a
      Conservation and Land Management (CALM) aerial
      burn as a backdrop (see the photo above). The
      second night of use was at 37 Mile Break, Avon
      Valley National Park on June 5, 2006. Had the
      pleasure of sharing this non-designated, walking
      "camping" area with a bunch of school kids!
      Thankfully the Evolution handled it well, even if the tester didn't.

      No new issues where noted during these later two
      test trips, so my Field Report summary pretty
      much stays the same in this report. This summary
      is finalised here. My test plan is outlined in my Initial Report.

      * Ability of the tent to provide shelter in three
      season weather conditions, particularly during
      winter here in Western Australia.
      * Stability of the tent in varying weather conditions.

      Throughout the test period I have not experienced
      much in the way of rain, but I have experienced
      some windy nights. Nights where it was windy
      enough to keep me awake with the flapping of the
      tent. Ideally I would liked to have guyed out the
      tent on these windy nights but did not receive
      the guy ropes and titanium pegs during the test
      period. My experience therefore is reflective of
      a less than ideal pitch. All that said, other
      than some excessive flapping of the tent I have
      been happy with the performance of the Evolution IP.

      *Ability of the tent design to minimise condensation.

      Due to most nights been windy or mild, I have not
      experienced any significant conditions likely to
      produce condensation so really can't comment on
      this aspect, other than to say I have not experienced any condensation of note.

      * Airflow in varying weather conditions.

      I am happy with the level of airflow that I have
      been able to get with the tent. In fact on one
      night I brought the non-vestibule side of the fly
      in closer to inner to reduce the air flow as it was getting cold.

      * Ease of pitch and break down in varying weather
      conditions with a particular focus on the single pitch approach.

      As I indicated early I find the single pitch
      approach a bit of a fiddle and frustrating
      process as the fly and inner don't match together
      at enough points, meaning often that they have
      got tangled or it is hard to locate and push or
      pull out the poles and so have given this idea
      away. That said I have been happy with the ease
      of pitching and pull down. The tent hasn't blown away!

      * Functionality of the interior dimensions/shelter design.

      Love the space this tent provides. Find it more
      than sufficient for me. I keep some clothes and
      bit and pieces in the tent, the balance of my
      gear stays in my pack or loose under the
      vestibule. My only negative on this aspect is the
      size/location of the door way as discussed in the
      Field Report. If the door can be enlarged/moved
      towards the big end of the tent I would suggest the design is then ideal.

      * Functionality of the vestibule design for storage of gear.

      I use the vestibule to store my Granite Gear
      Stratus Latitude pack and my shoes. I have found
      it adequate and on the nights it did rain, it
      provided full protection for my gear.

      * Access to the shelter with gear in the vestibule.

      Again no issues. This is where the current door
      size/location comes into play as it opens widely
      into the vestibule area, making it easy to access gear in the vestibule.

      * Durability of the floor in varying ground pitch conditions;
      * Durability of the zips, fasteners, fly, inner
      and poles during the test period.

      No signs of wear and tear noted during the test.
      My only negative here has been my experience with
      the carbon pole, not a design problem, more of a
      clumsy gear tester problem. That all said, I do
      have one bug-bear and that is I find that I
      always catch the vestibule fly zip rain flap in
      the zip. Damn annoying on a zipper run in the middle of the night.

      So what do I like about the Evolution 1P?

      1. Its light weight;
      2. Smallness of the packaged size;
      3. A stuff sack that is big enough for the tent -
      what a breath of fresh air, no fighting with tent and stuff sack every morning;
      4. Airflow through the tent;
      5. Drying pocket and gear pocket;
      6. Access to the vestibule from inside the tent;
      7. Interior space;

      What do I dislike about the Evolution IP?

      1. Door opening size/location in terms of getting in and out of the tent;
      2. The ease with which the fly zip catches in the
      zip flap. Damn annoying on the zipper runs in the night;
      3. No guy ropes to insure a tight pitch on windy nights.

      What am I neutral about at this point in the test:

      1. The inner/fly pitch together design. Would
      like to see more connection points, at least four
      more to help keep the fly and inner together.

      My thanks to BackpackGearTest.org and Big Sky
      International for being able to participate in this test.

      [Click here to return to the top]

      Senior Edit Moderator and List Moderator
    • Christine
      Thanks Andrew, Edits below. EDIT: the table of contents doesn t link to the long term report, and the links to the initial and field reports are broken.
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 6, 2006
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        Thanks Andrew,

        Edits below.

        EDIT: the table of contents doesn't link to the long term report,
        and the links to the initial and field reports are broken.

        Manufacturer's specified weight: The manufacturer gives a weight of
        1.02 kg (2lbs 4 oz) for the shelter, fly and carbon poles and 1.16 kg
        (2lbs 9 oz) for the shelter, fly and aluminium poles.
        EDIT: space needed between 2 and lbs in both conversions.

        No new issues where noted during these later two test trips, so my
        Field Report summary pretty much stays the same in this report. This
        summary is finalised here. My test plan is outlined in my Initial
        Report.
        EDIT: it seems that the Field Report should be linked here

        I have been happy with the performance of the Evolution IP. /and/
        What do I dislike about the Evolution IP?
        EDIT: Evolution 1P

        Thanks again! Great working with you on this one.

        Christine
      • Andrew Priest
        ... Thanks Christine. All fixed and uploaded I hope. Regards Andrew
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 8, 2006
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          At 10:47 PM 6/07/2006, you wrote:
          >Thanks Andrew,
          >
          >Edits below.

          Thanks Christine. All fixed and uploaded I hope.

          Regards
          Andrew
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