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IR Crazy Creek Hammock -- Brian T

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  • Brian
    Here is my Initial Report for the Crazy Creek Hammock. You can find it in the test folder
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 20 8:49 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Here is my Initial Report for the Crazy Creek Hammock. You can find it
      in the test folder

      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/Crazy%20Creek%20Hammock%20IR%20--%20Brian%20T/

      or

      http://tinyurl.com/lo5vw

      or below.

      Thanks,
      Brian

      ##############

      Initial Report Crazy Creek Crib LEX Lightweight w/ UltraLite Tarp
      By Brian Tannehill

      Personal Information Background Information Product Information
      Field Locations Initial Thoughts Questions Concerns Test Plan

      logo

      Personal Information:

      Age: 31
      Gender: Male
      Height: 5' 7" (1.7 m)
      Weight: 185 lb (79 kg)
      Name: Brian Tannehill
      Date: 18 Jun 06
      Email: tannehillclan(at)gmail(dot)com
      Location: Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA

      Backpacking Background:

      I am fairly new to backpacking, but I have hunted/fished/camped all my
      life in East Texas, Colorado, and California. My young kids (4, 10,
      12) limit me to weekend overnight camping trips, or day hikes
      Geocaching. I am also an avid mountain biker. Currently I live in
      Colorado Springs, Co at the base of the Rocky Mountains. Pike National
      Forest surrounds me at 9000 - 14,110 feet (2743 m - 4301 m). Snow can
      happen 10 months out of the year and summer is the hottest reaching 65
      deg F + (18 C), The other months average 45 deg F (7 C).

      Product Information:

      Manufacturer: Crazy Creek
      Year of Manufacture: 2005
      URL: http://www.crazycreek.com/
      MSRP: $ 199.00 USD
      Weight: 54 oz (1531 g)
      Weights as I measured them:
      Poles each: 3 oz (84 g) x 2
      Aluminum Stakes each: 3/8 oz (12g) x6
      Tie Out Ropes: 3 1/2 oz (100 g)
      Rain Fly: 12 5/8 oz (356 g)
      Hammock: 2 lbs 3/4 oz (928 g)
      Stuff Sack: 1 1/4 oz (36 g)

      Field Locations:

      The locations of my tests will mostly be in the Rocky Mountains of
      Pike National Forest just west of Colorado Springs. Elevations will be
      from 7000 feet (2134 m) at my house up to around 10,000 feet (3048 m)
      in the local mountains. Weather at this time of the year is fairly
      warm. Temperatures will range from a high of mid 80's (26 C) and a low
      of mid 50's (10 C) through the month of July to mid 60's (15 C) for a
      high to mid 30's ( -1 C) for the low in the month of October. The
      terrain is typical rocky mountain terrain for the Rockies with
      numerous trees to hang from.

      My initial thoughts and description:

      This is my first real hammock besides the homemade ones I have
      unsuccessfully used in the past few months. My first thought was this
      thing is not as heavy as I expected. For some reason I thought this
      hammock weighed in around 5 lbs (2.2 kg). There are basically 4
      sections to this hammock. The hammock, the poles, the tarp, and the
      rope to tie out the tarp. I've set the hammock up on my back porch a
      few times just to check it out.

      This is how it came shipped to me inside the stuff sack. The blue
      thing is the tarp, and the green is the hammock.

      Shipped

      The top part is all bug netting, while the bottom has a place for the
      sleeping pad and one of the two inside mesh pockets.

      Setup

      Bottom of the hammock showing the sleeping pad holder.

      bottom

      One of the problems I have had is my Therm-a-Rest sleeping pad is too
      wide, while my Z Rest just folded up while trying to stuff it in
      there. I will keep trying to get the Z Rest in but so far I've had no
      luck.

      I climb into the hammock from the top through a zipper that runs the
      length of the ridge. Another one of my concerns is the zipper. At each
      end of the bug neeting is a set of poles that hold the bug netting up
      like a tent. I'm concerned about where the zipper meets that area as
      it is really tight.

      zipper1

      I can actually see the blue sleeping pad holder through the zipper in
      this area while I can not in the other areas.

      zipper2

      Here is a close up of the buckle. The little blue piece I almost
      ripped off until after I read the instructions. It causes the rain to
      run off. Go figure!

      buckle

      Finally here is a picture of the end of the hammock. This shows the
      webbing, buckle, and how the end of the hammock is constructed. The
      webbing actually slides through the end of the hammock in a little
      sleeve with reinforced ends.

      end

      I have yet to set up the tarp as it has been too hot. However the tarp
      is supper slippery and is tough to roll back up. SHould be interesting
      to try and figure that one out.

      I'm not sure of the weight limit of this hammock but I have placed
      myself and my daughter in the hammock at the same time. Together we
      weigh in at about 220 lbs (100 kg). I have only done that for a few
      minutes as she squirms too much and I kick her out. I have also taken
      a quick cat nap in it and it is fairly comfortable. I do notice the
      sides tend to roll my shoulder up some and my knees are flexed.
      Setting the hammock up right is a major concern. I'm hoping that I can
      get the pad in place inside the pad holder and the bottom will flatten
      out some.

      Oh and by the way for all the hammockers out there, I have rolled out
      of this one already....

      Some of my questions and concerns:

      Is there a proper way to set up the hammock?
      Will the material stretch some so the zipper is not as tight?
      How easy is this thing to set up? How long does it take? Is it easier
      or harder than I expected?
      How easy is the Crib to get in and out of?
      Does it balance well? Will I fall out? LOL I've fallen out of every
      hammock I have used.
      Does it lend itself to sleeping on my side? Stomach? At a diagonal
      across the bottom or with my feet off either side?
      Can it be used as a quick camp chair?
      How will it stand up to the wind?
      Some of the old reports mentioned the lines on the hammock fraying.
      Has this changed any?

      Test Plan:

      My test plan consist of answering the above questions, and using this
      hammock with a few different sleeping bag configurations. I also plan
      to use it on the ground as a bivy. I think it will make a pretty nice
      one man tet/bivy. I will be using it on numerous hikes up a local
      place called Stanley Canyon in the Pike National Forest. Temperatures
      will start to drop after July so I may be moving to a bivy.

      Thanks to BGT and Crazy Creek for allowing me to participate in this test.

      Brian
    • Brian
      I posted this for edit 10 days ago and I hope I did not miss them. If I did then my apologies, if not could it be edited? I also did not see it in the yahoo
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 30 8:23 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        I posted this for edit 10 days ago and I hope I did not miss them. If
        I did then my apologies, if not could it be edited?

        I also did not see it in the yahoo database last week.

        Thanks,
        Brian

        ---------- Forwarded message ----------
        From: Brian <tannehillclan@...>
        Date: Jun 20, 2006 9:49 PM
        Subject: IR Crazy Creek Hammock -- Brian T
        To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com


        Here is my Initial Report for the Crazy Creek Hammock. You can find it
        in the test folder

        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/Crazy%20Creek%20Hammock%20IR%20--%20Brian%20T/

        or

        http://tinyurl.com/lo5vw

        or below.

        Thanks,
        Brian

        ##############

        Initial Report Crazy Creek Crib LEX Lightweight w/ UltraLite Tarp
        By Brian Tannehill

        Personal Information Background Information Product Information
        Field Locations Initial Thoughts Questions
        Concerns Test Plan

        logo

        Personal Information:

        Age: 31
        Gender: Male
        Height: 5' 7" (1.7 m)
        Weight: 185 lb (79 kg)
        Name: Brian Tannehill
        Date: 18 Jun 06
        Email: tannehillclan(at)gmail(dot)com
        Location: Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA

        Backpacking Background:

        I am fairly new to backpacking, but I have hunted/fished/camped all my
        life in East Texas, Colorado, and California. My young kids (4, 10,
        12) limit me to weekend overnight camping trips, or day hikes
        Geocaching. I am also an avid mountain biker. Currently I live in
        Colorado Springs, Co at the base of the Rocky Mountains. Pike National
        Forest surrounds me at 9000 - 14,110 feet (2743 m - 4301 m). Snow can
        happen 10 months out of the year and summer is the hottest reaching 65
        deg F + (18 C), The other months average 45 deg F (7 C).

        Product Information:

        Manufacturer: Crazy Creek
        Year of Manufacture: 2005
        URL: http://www.crazycreek.com/
        MSRP: $ 199.00 USD
        Weight: 54 oz (1531 g)
        Weights as I measured them:
        Poles each: 3 oz (84 g) x 2
        Aluminum Stakes each: 3/8 oz (12g) x6
        Tie Out Ropes: 3 1/2 oz (100 g)
        Rain Fly: 12 5/8 oz (356 g)
        Hammock: 2 lbs 3/4 oz (928 g)
        Stuff Sack: 1 1/4 oz (36 g)

        Field Locations:

        The locations of my tests will mostly be in the Rocky Mountains of
        Pike National Forest just west of Colorado Springs. Elevations will be
        from 7000 feet (2134 m) at my house up to around 10,000 feet (3048 m)
        in the local mountains. Weather at this time of the year is fairly
        warm. Temperatures will range from a high of mid 80's (26 C) and a low
        of mid 50's (10 C) through the month of July to mid 60's (15 C) for a
        high to mid 30's ( -1 C) for the low in the month of October. The
        terrain is typical rocky mountain terrain for the Rockies with
        numerous trees to hang from.

        My initial thoughts and description:

        This is my first real hammock besides the homemade ones I have
        unsuccessfully used in the past few months. My first thought was this
        thing is not as heavy as I expected. For some reason I thought this
        hammock weighed in around 5 lbs (2.2 kg). There are basically 4
        sections to this hammock. The hammock, the poles, the tarp, and the
        rope to tie out the tarp. I've set the hammock up on my back porch a
        few times just to check it out.

        This is how it came shipped to me inside the stuff sack. The blue
        thing is the tarp, and the green is the hammock.

        Shipped

        The top part is all bug netting, while the bottom has a place for the
        sleeping pad and one of the two inside mesh pockets.

        Setup

        Bottom of the hammock showing the sleeping pad holder.

        bottom

        One of the problems I have had is my Therm-a-Rest sleeping pad is too
        wide, while my Z Rest just folded up while trying to stuff it in
        there. I will keep trying to get the Z Rest in but so far I've had no
        luck.

        I climb into the hammock from the top through a zipper that runs the
        length of the ridge. Another one of my concerns is the zipper. At each
        end of the bug neeting is a set of poles that hold the bug netting up
        like a tent. I'm concerned about where the zipper meets that area as
        it is really tight.

        zipper1

        I can actually see the blue sleeping pad holder through the zipper in
        this area while I can not in the other areas.

        zipper2

        Here is a close up of the buckle. The little blue piece I almost
        ripped off until after I read the instructions. It causes the rain to
        run off. Go figure!

        buckle

        Finally here is a picture of the end of the hammock. This shows the
        webbing, buckle, and how the end of the hammock is constructed. The
        webbing actually slides through the end of the hammock in a little
        sleeve with reinforced ends.

        end

        I have yet to set up the tarp as it has been too hot. However the tarp
        is supper slippery and is tough to roll back up. SHould be interesting
        to try and figure that one out.

        I'm not sure of the weight limit of this hammock but I have placed
        myself and my daughter in the hammock at the same time. Together we
        weigh in at about 220 lbs (100 kg). I have only done that for a few
        minutes as she squirms too much and I kick her out. I have also taken
        a quick cat nap in it and it is fairly comfortable. I do notice the
        sides tend to roll my shoulder up some and my knees are flexed.
        Setting the hammock up right is a major concern. I'm hoping that I can
        get the pad in place inside the pad holder and the bottom will flatten
        out some.

        Oh and by the way for all the hammockers out there, I have rolled out
        of this one already....

        Some of my questions and concerns:

        Is there a proper way to set up the hammock?
        Will the material stretch some so the zipper is not as tight?
        How easy is this thing to set up? How long does it take? Is it easier
        or harder than I expected?
        How easy is the Crib to get in and out of?
        Does it balance well? Will I fall out? LOL I've fallen out of every
        hammock I have used.
        Does it lend itself to sleeping on my side? Stomach? At a diagonal
        across the bottom or with my feet off either side?
        Can it be used as a quick camp chair?
        How will it stand up to the wind?
        Some of the old reports mentioned the lines on the hammock fraying.
        Has this changed any?

        Test Plan:

        My test plan consist of answering the above questions, and using this
        hammock with a few different sleeping bag configurations. I also plan
        to use it on the ground as a bivy. I think it will make a pretty nice
        one man tet/bivy. I will be using it on numerous hikes up a local
        place called Stanley Canyon in the Pike National Forest. Temperatures
        will start to drop after July so I may be moving to a bivy.

        Thanks to BGT and Crazy Creek for allowing me to participate in this test.

        Brian
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