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IR - Coleman Fyrestorm - Josh Cormier

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  • swifteagle1_2003
    Hello, I have finished the text version of my IR for the Coleman Fyrestorm. I will try to get the HTML version updated with pictures and uploaded tonight. My
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 1, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello,

      I have finished the text version of my IR for the Coleman Fyrestorm.
      I will try to get the HTML version updated with pictures and uploaded
      tonight.

      My IR follows:

      Coleman Exponent Fyrestorm Stove – Initial Report

      Personal biographical information:
      • Name: Josh Cormier
      • Age: 26
      • Gender: Male
      • Height: 5' 11" (1.80 m)
      • Weight: 175 lb (79 kg)
      • Email address: swifteagle1 at hotmail dot com
      • City: Los Gatos, California
      • Date: 2-Jun-06

      Backpacking background:
      I started backpacking with the Boy Scouts when was 11 and have been
      camping and backpacking ever since. I'm now geared toward more
      challenging trips ranging from week-long to weekend in mountainous
      areas covering from 7-14 miles (11.27 - 22.54 km) a day. I would
      classify my gear as mid weight although now I am trying to move more
      toward lightweight. I go backpacking at least once a year in the
      Sierra Nevada Mountains as well as monthly car camping trips with the
      Scouts.


      Product Information: (information taken from Coleman website)

      - Item Description: Coleman Fyrestorm Stove
      - Listed Stove weight: 7.7 oz (218 g)
      - Measured Stove weight: XX oz (XX g)
      - Listed Stove & pump unit weight: 7.7 oz (303 g)
      - Measured Stove & pump unit weight: XX oz (XX g)
      - Listed Stove & canister adapter weight: 11.0 oz (312 g)
      - Measured Stove & canister adapter weight: XX oz (XX g)
      - BTUs Canister: 14,000
      - Boil Time Canister: 3.2 min
      - Burn Time Canister: 45 min
      - BTUs Liquid: 10,000
      - Boil Time Liquid: 3.5 min
      - Burn Time Liquid: 75 min
      - Dimensions—3 1/4" h x 6 3/4" w x 6 1/4" d
      - Pack Size—3 1/4" h x 5 3/4" w x 3 3/4" d
      - Fuel used: Runs on Coleman® fuel, unleaded gasoline, or
      butane/propane
      - Manufactures web site: http://www.coleman.com
      - Year of Manufacture: 2006
      - MSRP: $189.99
      - Item Received: 24-May-06
      - Initial Condition: The product arrived in new condition
      - Item Completeness: The item was well packaged and included all
      required pieces.
      - Package Includes: 22 oz. fuel bottle, liquid fuel pump, canister
      fuel stand, stove, spare parts, liquid fuel bottle lid, storage sack,
      and instructions in three languages.

      Packaging:
      The stove arrived in brown cardboard box that was 2-3 times
      lager that the stove box inside. After removing the ample padding I
      saw a stylish Coleman exponent box that gives stats on the size, burn
      time and weight of the stove. The box also has pictures of the stove
      completely set up with the liquid fuel bottle setup and well as the
      canister fuel setup. Inside the box the stove components are
      separated by cardboard loops and chambers. The instructions for
      setting up the stove were located on the top of everything and came
      in booklet form, written in English, French, and Spanish.

      Initial Impressions:
      The stove is lightweight but still has a sturdy feel to it thanks to
      the titanium parts including the serrated pot stand and the burner
      head. The stove legs and those on the canister stand look somewhat
      like plastic but are in fact a powder coated magnesium alloy
      material. The legs on both the stove and the canister stand fold
      together to make packing into the included sack easier. All
      connections are made of brass and are easy to connect since the
      outside of all screw-in pieces were knurled for non slip use. The
      included repair kit seems to include all the pieces that might be
      needed to complete any minor repair on the stove. All of the
      connectors came to me covered with plastic caps to keep dirt and
      grime from clogging the fuel pathways. The included fuel bottle and
      pump look sturdy and seem to be well designed.

      Spare parts pics

      First Time Setup (Reflector and Windscreen):
      The reflector and windscreen are made of a sturdy aluminum that looks
      like it can take a lot of use. Initially the factory folds were a bit
      tough to get out of the reflector and windscreen to make them open
      all the way. Over time with careful folding I think that I can keep
      from putting such deep creases in the material. Other than that
      initial observation, the reflector and windscreen unfolded easily and
      were simple to setup. The reflector unfolds into a circle shape and
      lays flat under the stove with the stove's legs sitting on top of it.
      The windscreen should be shaped into a circle with the ends folded
      over each other to keep the circle closed. There is an opening on a
      small portion of the bottom section of the windscreen for the fuel
      line to fit through. This allows the user to make adjustments using
      the flame adjustor located on the stove through the windscreen.

      First Time Setup (Canister fuel):
      The fist time setup of the stove using the canister fuel source was
      straight forward. First I unfolded the legs of the stove and the
      canister stand. Then making sure that the fuel valve was closed, I
      screwed the fuel canister into the top of the fuel canister stand.
      Next I connected the fuel line which is covered with a stainless
      steel mesh from the stove into the canister stand, connecting the two
      together.


      First Time Cooking (Canister fuel):
      Seeing as this was a new stove to me and wanting to test it as the
      manufacture intended its use, I decided to read the instructions
      before my first use. Following the directions I turned the flame
      adjustor to the Open/Light position and then opened the fuel valve
      while holding my lighter over the burner holes. The stove immediately
      ignited with a whoosh and started sending some sparks out of the
      burner area. I let the stove burn for a while with the fuel adjustor
      in the full open position to let the stove warm up. I noticed during
      this time that the Titanium pot stands were getting red hot at the
      tips and the generator was also glowing bright orange. Now turning
      the fuel adjustor to low I noticed a slight decrease in the output of
      the stove. Notice I said slight as it does not seem that the fuel
      adjustor will turn the burner down to anything close to a simmer. I
      will try cooking something that requires a lower heat to see if
      simmering is possible when cooking with the with canister fuel source.

      The fist test I ran for this stove was to boil a quart (0.95 L) of
      water in my titanium pot, utilizing both the reflector as well as the
      wind screen. I used a candy thermometer to measure the temperature of
      the water to determine when it was truly boiling. The water used was
      distilled water, room temperature, I measured the amount of water
      using the graduated marks on my Nalgene. I found that with the flame
      adjustor on high, the stove was able to boil a quart (0.95 L) of
      water in about 5 minutes. For the boiling water test I used my
      titanium pot that holds a little over a quart (0.95 L), I found that
      on level ground the stove was stable and had no problem supporting
      the weight of that much water.



      First Time Setup (Liquid fuel):
      The fist time setup of the stove using the liquid fuel source was
      simple enough. First I filled the fuel bottle with Coleman fuel to
      the 2/3rds mark. The directions state that this is important,
      otherwise the stove will not light correctly. Next I gave the bottle
      40 pumps after making sure the valve was closed all the way. The hose
      connected the stove to the bottle easily completing the setup. The
      instructions for setup and lighting the stove are conveniently
      printed on the fuel bottle where they can't be lost and for quick
      reference. For the boiling water test I again used my titanium pot
      that holds a little over a quart (0.95 L). The entire setup took only
      a few minutes and was very easy to figure out even without directions.

      First Time Cooking (Liquid fuel):
      I've had some experience with white gas stoves, mostly with the
      fireball startup so common to them. With these experiences and
      Coleman's claim of a new white gas startup technology, I decided to
      it would be in my best interest to read and follow Coleman's
      instructions on how to light the stove. The instructions say to turn
      the fuel adjustor to Open/Light and to open the fuel valve while
      holding a match over the stove burner. I was doubtful that this was
      really the correct way to light the stove and envisioned fuel
      spurting all over the place. Putting all that aside I proceeded to
      light the stove just as the instructions on the bottle dictated and
      was pleasantly surprised at the results. As soon as I turned the fuel
      valve on and the burner lit there was some yellow flame followed
      closely by a blue flame. This pattern repeated several seconds before
      the yellow flame disappeared and the blue flame took over. I gave the
      fuel bottle another 20 pumps to keep pressure up till the generator
      took over and opened the fuel valve all the way. Overall it took less
      than a minute for the stove to reach a steady blue cooking flame.
      With the flame adjustor on high the output is somewhat less than that
      of the canister but still hot enough to turn the pot supports a
      glowing orange. With the flame adjustor on low it looks as if the
      stove will be able to simmer.

      The fist test I ran for this stove using Coleman fuel was to boil a
      quart (0.95 L) of water in my titanium pot, utilizing both the
      reflector as well as the wind screen. I used a candy thermometer to
      measure the temperature of the water to determine when it was truly
      boiling. The water used was distilled water, room temperature, I
      measured the amount of water using the graduated marks on my Nalgene.
      I found that with the flame adjustor on high, the stove was able to
      boil a quart (0.95 L) of water in just under 4 minutes.


      My test plan:
      I plan on testing the gear based on several different objectives.
      First and most importantly is dependability, does the gear work when
      it counts. Secondly is efficiency, does the gear do its job well.
      Lastly would be ease of use, is the gear easy to put together and
      easy to use. Throughout the test I will seek to answer the following
      questions.

      I'd like to try cooking some of those more delicate foods on this
      stove that I can't seem to keep from burning on my "Afterburner"
      stove. This would include pancakes, bacon, and maybe an omelet or
      two. For proper testing this cooking will be done changing between
      the different fuel sources.


      Dependability:

      Does the stove consistently fire up without any repair or adjustments?
      Does the stove hold up well under use?
      Will the stove be able to hold a 1 Quart pot with stability?
      Does the stove keep from getting carbon clogged when using white gas?
      Is the stove easy to take apart and repair?
      Does the stove work with the butane fuel in cold weather?

      Efficiency:

      Is the stoves flame fully adjustable to conserve fuel?
      Is the weight to dependability/usefulness ratio favorable?
      Does the stove cool down quickly so it can be packed away?
      Do I constantly have to pump the white gas when I am cooking?

      Ease of Use:

      Is the stove well thought out?
      Is the stove easy to setup and takedown?
      Is the stove easy to light?
      Is the process of connecting the stove to the fuel source straight
      forward?
      Is the instant start for the white gas easy to use and prevents
      overfilling primers?


      Thank you to Coleman and BackpackGearTest for allowing me to test
      this fine item,
      Josh Cormier
    • swifteagle1_2003
      Here is my completed Initial report for the Coleman Fyrestorm. The HTML version has been uploaded to the test area. Following is the Text version with all the
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 3, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Here is my completed Initial report for the Coleman Fyrestorm.

        The HTML version has been uploaded to the test area.

        Following is the Text version with all the weights entered this time.

        Josh Cormier

        Coleman Exponent Fyrestorm Stove – Initial Report


        Personal biographical information:

        · Name: Josh Cormier

        · Age: 26

        · Gender: Male

        · Height: 5' 11" (1.80 m)

        · Weight: 175 lb (79 kg)

        · Email address: swifteagle1 at
        hotmail dot com

        · City: Los Gatos, California

        · Date: 2-Jun-06



        Backpacking background:

        I started backpacking with the Boy Scouts when was 11 and have been
        camping and backpacking ever since. I'm now geared toward more
        challenging trips ranging from week-long to weekend in mountainous
        areas covering from 7-14 miles (11.27 - 22.54 km) a day. I would
        classify my gear as mid weight although now I am trying to move more
        toward lightweight. I go backpacking at least once a year in the
        Sierra Nevada Mountains as well as monthly car camping trips with the
        Scouts.





        Product Information: (information taken from Coleman website)



        - Item Description: Coleman Fyrestorm Stove

        - Listed Stove weight: 7.7 oz (218 g)

        - Measured Stove weight: 7.8 oz (221 g)

        - Listed Stove & pump unit weight: 10.7 oz (303 g)

        - Measured Stove & pump unit weight: 15.1 oz (428 g)

        - Listed Stove & canister adapter weight: 11.0 oz (312 g)

        - Measured Stove & canister adapter weight: 11.2 oz (318 g)

        - Measured reflector and windscreen weight: 3.1 oz (88 g)

        - BTUs Canister: 14,000

        - Boil Time Canister: 3.2 min

        - Burn Time Canister: 45 min

        - BTUs Liquid: 10,000

        - Boil Time Liquid: 3.5 min

        - Burn Time Liquid: 75 min

        - Dimensions—3 1/4" h x 6 3/4" w x 6 1/4" d

        - Pack Size—3 1/4" h x 5 3/4" w x 3 3/4" d

        - Fuel used: Runs on Coleman® fuel, unleaded gasoline, or
        butane/propane

        - Manufactures web site: http://www.coleman.com

        - Year of Manufacture: 2006

        - MSRP: $189.99

        - Item Received: 24-May-06

        - Initial Condition: The product arrived in new condition

        - Item Completeness: The item was well packaged and included all
        required pieces.

        - Package Includes: 22 oz. fuel bottle, liquid fuel pump, canister
        fuel stand, stove, spare parts, liquid fuel bottle lid, storage sack,
        and instructions in three languages.







        Packaging:

        The stove arrived in brown cardboard box that was 2-3 times lager
        that the stove box inside. After removing the ample padding I saw a
        stylish Coleman exponent box that gives stats on the size, burn time
        and weight of the stove. The box also has pictures of the stove
        completely set up with the liquid fuel bottle setup and well as the
        canister fuel setup. Inside the box the stove components are
        separated by cardboard loops and chambers. The instructions for
        setting up the stove were located on the top of everything and came
        in booklet form, written in English, French, and Spanish.







        Initial Impressions:

        The stove is lightweight but still has a sturdy feel to it thanks to
        the titanium parts including the serrated pot stand and the burner
        head. The stove legs and those on the canister stand look somewhat
        like plastic but are in fact a powder coated magnesium alloy
        material. The legs on both the stove and the canister stand fold
        together to make packing into the included sack easier. All
        connections are made of brass and are easy to connect since the
        outside of all screw-in pieces were knurled for non slip use. The
        included repair kit seems to include all the pieces that might be
        needed to complete any minor repair on the stove. All of the
        connectors came to me covered with plastic caps to keep dirt and
        grime from clogging the fuel pathways. The included fuel bottle and
        pump look sturdy and seem to be well designed.







        First Time Setup (Reflector and Windscreen):

        The reflector and windscreen are made of a sturdy aluminum that looks
        like it can take a lot of use. Initially the factory folds were a bit
        tough to get out of the reflector and windscreen to make them open
        all the way. Over time with careful folding I think that I can keep
        from putting such deep creases in the material. Other than that
        initial observation, the reflector and windscreen unfolded easily and
        were simple to setup. The reflector unfolds into a circle shape and
        lays flat under the stove with the stove's legs sitting on top of it.
        The windscreen should be shaped into a circle with the ends folded
        over each other to keep the circle closed. There is an opening on a
        small portion of the bottom section of the windscreen for the fuel
        line to fit through. This allows the user to make adjustments using
        the flame adjustor located on the stove through the windscreen.





        First Time Setup (Canister fuel):

        The fist time setup of the stove using the canister fuel source was
        straight forward. First I unfolded the legs of the stove and the
        canister stand. Then making sure that the fuel valve was closed, I
        screwed the fuel canister into the top of the fuel canister stand.
        Next I connected the fuel line which is covered with a stainless
        steel mesh from the stove into the canister stand, connecting the two
        together.







        First Time Cooking (Canister fuel):

        Seeing as this was a new stove to me and wanting to test it as the
        manufacture intended its use, I decided to read the instructions
        before my first use. Following the directions I turned the flame
        adjustor to the Open/Light position and then opened the fuel valve
        while holding my lighter over the burner holes. The stove immediately
        ignited with a whoosh and started sending some sparks out of the
        burner area. I let the stove burn for a while with the fuel adjustor
        in the full open position to let the stove warm up. I noticed during
        this time that the Titanium pot stands were getting red hot at the
        tips and the generator was also glowing bright orange. Now turning
        the fuel adjustor to low I noticed a slight decrease in the output of
        the stove. Notice I said slight as it does not seem that the fuel
        adjustor will turn the burner down to anything close to a simmer. I
        will try cooking something that requires a lower heat to see if
        simmering is possible when cooking with the with canister fuel source.



        The fist test I ran for this stove was to boil a quart (0.95 L) of
        water in my titanium pot, utilizing both the reflector as well as the
        wind screen. I used a candy thermometer to measure the temperature of
        the water to determine when it was truly boiling. The water used was
        distilled water, room temperature, I measured the amount of water
        using the graduated marks on my Nalgene. I found that with the flame
        adjustor on high, the stove was able to boil a quart (0.95 L) of
        water in about 5 minutes. For the boiling water test I used my
        titanium pot that holds a little over a quart (0.95 L), I found that
        on level ground the stove was stable and had no problem supporting
        the weight of that much water.





        First Time Setup (Liquid fuel):

        The fist time setup of the stove using the liquid fuel source was
        simple enough. First I filled the fuel bottle with Coleman fuel to
        the 2/3rds mark. The directions state that this is important,
        otherwise the stove will not light correctly. Next I gave the bottle
        40 pumps after making sure the valve was closed all the way. The hose
        connected the stove to the bottle easily completing the setup. The
        instructions for setup and lighting the stove are conveniently
        printed on the fuel bottle where they can't be lost and for quick
        reference. For the boiling water test I again used my titanium pot
        that holds a little over a quart (0.95 L). The entire setup took only
        a few minutes and was very easy to figure out even without directions.







        First Time Cooking (Liquid fuel):

        I've had some experience with white gas stoves, mostly with the
        fireball startup so common to them. With these experiences and
        Coleman's claim of a new white gas startup technology, I decided to
        it would be in my best interest to read and follow Coleman's
        instructions on how to light the stove. The instructions say to turn
        the fuel adjustor to Open/Light and to open the fuel valve while
        holding a match over the stove burner. I was doubtful that this was
        really the correct way to light the stove and envisioned fuel
        spurting all over the place. Putting all that aside I proceeded to
        light the stove just as the instructions on the bottle dictated and
        was pleasantly surprised at the results. As soon as I turned the fuel
        valve on and the burner lit there was some yellow flame followed
        closely by a blue flame. This pattern repeated several seconds before
        the yellow flame disappeared and the blue flame took over. I gave the
        fuel bottle another 20 pumps to keep pressure up till the generator
        took over and opened the fuel valve all the way. Overall it took less
        than a minute for the stove to reach a steady blue cooking flame.
        With the flame adjustor on high the output is somewhat less than that
        of the canister but still hot enough to turn the pot supports a
        glowing orange. With the flame adjustor on low it looks as if the
        stove will be able to simmer.







        The fist test I ran for this stove using Coleman fuel was to boil a
        quart (0.95 L) of water in my titanium pot, utilizing both the
        reflector as well as the wind screen. I used a candy thermometer to
        measure the temperature of the water to determine when it was truly
        boiling. The water used was distilled water, room temperature, I
        measured the amount of water using the graduated marks on my Nalgene.
        I found that with the flame adjustor on high, the stove was able to
        boil a quart (0.95 L) of water in just under 4 minutes.









        My test plan:

        I plan on testing the gear based on several different objectives.
        First and most importantly is dependability, does the gear work when
        it counts. Secondly is efficiency, does the gear do its job well.
        Lastly would be ease of use, is the gear easy to put together and
        easy to use. Throughout the test I will seek to answer the following
        questions.



        I'd like to try cooking some of those more delicate foods on this
        stove that I can't seem to keep from burning on my "Afterburner"
        stove. This would include pancakes, bacon, and maybe an omelet or
        two. For proper testing this cooking will be done changing between
        the different fuel sources.





        Dependability:



        Does the stove consistently fire up without any repair or adjustments?

        Does the stove hold up well under use?

        Will the stove be able to hold a 1 Quart pot with stability?

        Does the stove keep from getting carbon clogged when using white gas?

        Is the stove easy to take apart and repair?

        Does the stove work with the butane fuel in cold weather?





        Efficiency:



        Is the stoves flame fully adjustable to conserve fuel?

        Is the weight to dependability/usefulness ratio favorable?

        Does the stove cool down quickly so it can be packed away?

        Do I constantly have to pump the white gas when I am cooking?





        Ease of Use:



        Is the stove well thought out?

        Is the stove easy to setup and takedown?

        Is the stove easy to light?

        Is the process of connecting the stove to the fuel source straight
        forward?

        Is the instant start for the white gas easy to use and prevents
        overfilling primers?





        Thank you to Coleman and BackpackGearTest for allowing me to test
        this fine item,

        Josh Cormier
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