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LTR - A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike (amytys)

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  • Andy Mytys
    http://tinyurl.com/9cgz4 ... A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike Long Term Report Date Published: January 31, 2006 ... Tester s Biographical Information:
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 31, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      http://tinyurl.com/9cgz4

      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike
      Long Term Report


      Date Published: January 31, 2006

      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      Tester's Biographical Information:

      Reviewer: Andrew Mytys
      Email: amytys@...
      Homepage: Andy's Lightweight Backpacking Site
      Location: Michigan
      Age: 33
      Height: 6'1" (183 cm)
      Weight: 185 lbs (84 kg)


      Backpacking Background:

      I live in Michigan and have been hiking seriously for 15 years,
      although I've camped since I was 6 years old. I consider myself a
      lightweight hiker. I carry the lightest gear I can get my hands on
      which will provide a comfortable wilderness experience and adequately
      support the goals of my trip. Unless my goals are time/distance
      oriented, my pace is always slow. I rarely exceed 1.5 miles (2.4
      km)/hour. I rest frequently, hike long days, and enjoy whatever
      nature throws my way.

      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      Product Information:

      Publisher: Wayah Press (http://www.wayahpress.com)
      Title: A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike
      Author: Rick Allnutt, MD
      Year of Publication: 2005, 1st Edition
      ISBN: 0-9767227-0-4
      MSRP: $11.95 + 2.50 shipping and handling (U.S. only),
      + 7% state sales tax to Ohio-based destinations
      Weight as delivered: 6.6 oz (187 g)
      Size: 8.5 x 5.5 x .4 inches or 215 x 140 x 10 mm (H x W x D)
      116 pages, + copyright, dedication, table of contents, index, and
      ordering info

      The information in this Field Report of "A Wildly Successful 200-Mile
      Hike" is to be taken in addition to my Initial and Field reports.

      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      Product Description:

      "A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike" is a short book filled with
      lessons on how to overcome some of hiking's most common physical and
      mental challenges. The lessons are described by Dr. Rick Allnutt, the
      author, based on what he learned while tackling multi-day hikes and
      preparing for and hiking a 200-mile (322 km) segment of the
      Appalachian Trail (AT). While the book's lessons came about primarily
      while hiking the AT, what's proposed is valid, and indeed much of it
      can be applied, on any trail and for hikes of any distance. The sole
      picture in the book is on the cover - a color photo of the author
      relaxing along the AT near Cold Mountain, Virginia.


      What This Book is About - Who is it For?:

      "A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike" is about the challenges - both
      physical and mental - that the author experienced while preparing for
      and hiking a 200-mile (322 km) segment of the Appalachian Trail (AT).
      The lessons learned by the author are broken up into chapters
      dedicated to "the three biggest problems facing the 200-mile (322 km)
      hiker" - blisters and chaffing, knee pain, and losing the will to
      hike - and the advantages of "near-ultralight" hiking. The book uses
      the author's personal experiences and those of others hiking the
      Appalachian Trail as a basis for the examples and solutions given.

      The book is short, and my take on it is that it is most useful to
      those readers who have actually hiked before. This is not a how-to
      book, nor does the text go into any great detail in explaining terms
      and general hiking concepts. Readers who's feet have some hiking
      experience should find themselves nodding along at the ailments that
      the author chooses to focus on, if not based on personal experience
      then based on recognition - how many of us have never encountered a
      hiker with a bad case of blisters before, or a pack that weighs in at
      over 50 pounds (20 kg)?


      Worthwillity:

      In the book's introduction, the author writes a segment that he
      titles "Worthwillity," which summarizes his reasons for writing the
      book, his background and perspective, and his hope that readers will
      find his book, even a little, useful.

      I must admit that some of the book's lessons did indeed stick with me
      while hiking on the trail, and I found myself analyzing the
      challenges I was experiencing and thinking back to the author's
      comments.

      The book delivers a very good primer on blisters, chafing, and knee
      pain. The author uses his background as a physician, an engineer, and
      researcher to analyze the causes and anatomy of these three common
      trail injuries, as well the effect they can have on the hiker. While
      on the trail, I could reflect back on what the author had written,
      visualize what was happening in my shoes and in my shorts, and start
      to orchestrate a plan on how to fix the problem.

      Just as in the author's case, I found my issues with blisters,
      chafing, and knee pain becoming the overwhelming center of my thought
      process during my hikes.

      The author provides a few words of wisdom in terms of treatment,
      highlighting potential solutions by using his own hiking experiences
      as examples.

      I was able to use the information given in the book to decide on a
      course of action. In some cases, I followed the author's lead. In
      others, I worked out "personal answers," just as the author
      suggested.

      In the case of blisters, I didn't exactly encounter problems in the
      traditional sense as much as awakening and exercising the trail born
      calluses I already had. However, a pair of shoes I'm currently
      testing for backpackgeartest rub my feet persistently, just below
      each anklebone. This results in blisters that quickly progress into
      open, and bloody lesions.

      In between on-trail testing, I typically gave my feet a week to ten
      days of rest before using the shoes on uneven surfaces again.
      However, I was offered a 50 km (31 mile) dayhike challenge that I
      just couldn't refuse, and I found myself donning the test shoes,
      intentionally leaving my backup footwear at home, and hitting the
      trail. After about three miles (5 km), I could feel a sharp pain that
      I knew was due to the thin layer of new skin under each ankle being
      ripped off. In another few miles, I could see a bloodstain poking out
      through my thick hiking socks. "It's only a flesh wound," I exclaimed
      in my best British accent. The pace of the hike was fast - 50 km (31
      miles) in ten hours, including breaks - and there simply wasn't the
      time to properly tend to my wounds. What to do? One of the author's
      solutions is "layers, and more layers," meaning the presence of a
      thick defensive wall of padding over the blister that allow the
      layers to rub against one another without rubbing the skin. I already
      had two pairs of socks on, so I simply installed a cotton ball over
      the wounds, duct taped that in place, then put both pairs of socks
      on, and wrapped each ankle in a short section of elastic bandage. I
      then hobbled off in an effort to catch up with the rest of the group.

      Four miles (6 km) later, sweat in my "nether region" got the best of
      me, and I started to feel the type of chafing that the author
      calls "fire in the groin." This was hardly the first time I had
      chafing in this area, but I usually experienced it after longer
      distance (15 mile or 24 km) hikes in conditions characterized by heat
      and humidity, not at the ten-mile (16 km) mark during a cool, fall
      morning. I suspect that, due to the 3 MPH (5 KPH) pace I had to
      maintain, I sweated more than usual and chafing simply occurred
      earlier than expected. The author puts a lot of faith in a product
      called "Bodyglide," - a roll-on lubricant that seals the skin from
      further wetness. I had nothing to lose, no better ideas, and little
      time to invest in any solution. I had packed a stick of Bodyglide
      along in anticipation, and simply jumped into the bushes, shoved the
      Bodyglide in by pants, and proceeded with application at the first
      signs of chafing. After about 15 seconds, I was back on the trail. I
      caught the problem early on, and the Bodyglide worked wonders. No
      more chafing and no more "fire in the groin" for the remainder of the
      hike - an additional seven hours of hiking!

      At about the 18-mile (29 km) mark, my shoe kicked a root. I felt my
      foot inside my right shoe slide forward along the insole, and a
      burning sensation ensued - I literally felt the skin along the balls
      of my feet separating from my toes! The author states that the key
      ingredients to blisters are moisture, friction, and heat. Well, my
      feet were sweaty after so many miles without any attention, I had
      just provided a substantial amount of friction, and I could literally
      see steam rising off of my foot as I removed it from my shoe. I
      quickly changed into a fresh pair of both liner and hiking socks that
      I had in my pack, and my feet immediately felt refreshed, ready to
      tackle the remaining 13 miles (21 km) of the hike.

      In terms of knee pain, one of the author's points in his formula for
      healthy knees is to relieve stress to the knee. I typically get knee
      pain on the trail after about 18 miles (29 km) of hiking. Just as
      with my chafing concerns, I would need a quick remedy on my long
      hike, with no time for experimentation or solutions that didn't work.
      The author didn't offer any sure-fire shortcuts, so I went into my
      outfitter and asked for a pair of after-market insoles for my shoes
      that offered maximum cushioning, and added that I could care less
      about support. GIVE ME CUSHIONING!!! The salesman returned with an
      insole made of gel that, according to the manufacturer,
      provided "superior cushioning and 44% energy return." The insoles
      were THICK and SPONGY - I was sold. Given all the warnings, lessons,
      and self-reflection that the book inspired, I was able to come up
      with personal system that got me through 50 km (31 miles) of trail in
      ten hours, and free from pain to boot.


      My Final Thoughts:

      The book begins with subjects that are physical in nature and
      therefore easily lend themselves to dissection. The author's training
      as a physician, engineer, and researcher serve to produce a very
      thorough primer on the subjects of blisters, chafing and knee pain.

      Some of the text leaves me scratching my head. For example, in the
      chapter on chafing the author states:

      "I have successfully hiked in nylon swimming trunks. These are boxer-
      like trunks with a polyester brief sewn in. They can be rinsed in
      stream water, and put back on to dry. In very humid weather, I have
      even put them back on inside out to dry more quickly. I almost always
      carry a pair because they make great town clothes and can be
      important when dealing with chafing during the first few days of a
      hike. There is a tendency, especially in hot weather, for salt to
      become encrusted in the material of the brief, making it like
      sandpaper, and for that to wear away at the skin of each upper leg."
      Huh? I don't get it? Are they good or bad? The first half of the
      paragraph has me writing them on a shopping list, and then I read
      that they are like "sandpaper" and think the author is recommending
      against them. What gives?

      As I wrote in my Field Report, I was less than thrilled with the
      second half of the book. As someone who loves to sleep, finds himself
      in awe when bad weather moves in, and tells his wife to "go back to
      sleep," after being woken up in the Sierras and told that a bear that
      just brushed up against the tent (yes, it was a bear), I had little
      patience, and found no value, in the author's philosophies on
      combating loneliness, fear of the dark, nightmares, and other
      psychological issues (losing the will to hike). I was also less than
      enthusiastic about the scant level of detail that was given to the
      topic of lightweight backpacking, especially after seeing the
      author's thorough work in discussing blisters, chafing, and knee
      pain. Between the book's introduction, the chapter on losing the will
      to hike, the chapter on lightweight backpacking, and a summary
      chapter offering no new information, I found only about 45% of the
      book to be of interest. That said, I did gain some value from that
      45%, as indicated at the beginning of this report.

      There's also the lack of overall perspective given in terms of the
      field conditions that the author encountered. The book details
      experiences from hiking a 200-mile (322 km) segment of the
      Appalachian Trail in mid-May. It reflects the culmination of
      experiences gained from hiking anywhere from weekend excursions to
      that single, two week, 200-mile (322 km) hike. Overall, I got the
      feeling that most of the lessons had their origins on the author's
      200-mile (322 km) hike, taken at a specific point in time and under
      specific weather conditions, meaning that the author's own
      experiences were limited. I found myself wishing the author had hiked
      in mid-July instead of mid-May, hoping that after experiencing
      intense heat and humidity, drought, and other, more serious
      challenges, the book would have been directed more towards the sort
      of concrete issues found in the first half of the book, with less
      attention paid to psychological or philosophical matters.

      The author makes no promises that the book is anything more than a
      description of his discoveries, his failures, and his ideas. In the
      end, the book's best advice can be summed up by what the author
      writes in his introduction:

      "If what I am doing in my hike is working, I keep doing it. If it is
      not working, then I take on the responsibility to find a better way,
      and then a better way after that."

      I found reading "A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike" to be insightful
      and thought provoking in many areas, and the book proved to be a bit
      of an inspiration in making me analyze my own issues and in trying to
      come up with solutions, rather than taking the attitude that any
      problems encountered on the trail are simply "all part of a good
      day's hike." The book has given me an excuse to, once again, re-
      evaluate what I carry and try to lessen the weight in my pack.

      Finally, the author states that "if a reader of this book finds one
      of my experiences useful, then I will rejoice." Well, the author can
      rejoice in that I have found one, even many, of the experiences he
      shared to be useful. At the same time, I would have liked to hear
      more. I wish that the author had tried hiking that 200-miles (322 km)
      across at least a few different seasons, just to give readers a set
      of more well rounded opinions.

      ------------------------------------------------------------------
    • Chuck Carnes
      No edits that I can see Andy. Good job, very thorough. BTW, Nice picture...you should have been holding the book or something. :) Upload when ready.
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 1, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        No edits that I can see Andy. Good job, very thorough.
        BTW, Nice picture...you should have been holding the book or
        something. :)

        Upload when ready.



        --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Andy Mytys" <amytys@h...>
        wrote:
        >
        >
        > http://tinyurl.com/9cgz4
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike
        > Long Term Report
        >
        >
        > Date Published: January 31, 2006
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > Tester's Biographical Information:
        >
        > Reviewer: Andrew Mytys
        > Email: amytys@g...
        > Homepage: Andy's Lightweight Backpacking Site
        > Location: Michigan
        > Age: 33
        > Height: 6'1" (183 cm)
        > Weight: 185 lbs (84 kg)
        >
        >
        > Backpacking Background:
        >
        > I live in Michigan and have been hiking seriously for 15 years,
        > although I've camped since I was 6 years old. I consider myself a
        > lightweight hiker. I carry the lightest gear I can get my hands on
        > which will provide a comfortable wilderness experience and adequately
        > support the goals of my trip. Unless my goals are time/distance
        > oriented, my pace is always slow. I rarely exceed 1.5 miles (2.4
        > km)/hour. I rest frequently, hike long days, and enjoy whatever
        > nature throws my way.
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > Product Information:
        >
        > Publisher: Wayah Press (http://www.wayahpress.com)
        > Title: A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike
        > Author: Rick Allnutt, MD
        > Year of Publication: 2005, 1st Edition
        > ISBN: 0-9767227-0-4
        > MSRP: $11.95 + 2.50 shipping and handling (U.S. only),
        > + 7% state sales tax to Ohio-based destinations
        > Weight as delivered: 6.6 oz (187 g)
        > Size: 8.5 x 5.5 x .4 inches or 215 x 140 x 10 mm (H x W x D)
        > 116 pages, + copyright, dedication, table of contents, index, and
        > ordering info
        >
        > The information in this Field Report of "A Wildly Successful 200-Mile
        > Hike" is to be taken in addition to my Initial and Field reports.
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > Product Description:
        >
        > "A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike" is a short book filled with
        > lessons on how to overcome some of hiking's most common physical and
        > mental challenges. The lessons are described by Dr. Rick Allnutt, the
        > author, based on what he learned while tackling multi-day hikes and
        > preparing for and hiking a 200-mile (322 km) segment of the
        > Appalachian Trail (AT). While the book's lessons came about primarily
        > while hiking the AT, what's proposed is valid, and indeed much of it
        > can be applied, on any trail and for hikes of any distance. The sole
        > picture in the book is on the cover - a color photo of the author
        > relaxing along the AT near Cold Mountain, Virginia.
        >
        >
        > What This Book is About - Who is it For?:
        >
        > "A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike" is about the challenges - both
        > physical and mental - that the author experienced while preparing for
        > and hiking a 200-mile (322 km) segment of the Appalachian Trail (AT).
        > The lessons learned by the author are broken up into chapters
        > dedicated to "the three biggest problems facing the 200-mile (322 km)
        > hiker" - blisters and chaffing, knee pain, and losing the will to
        > hike - and the advantages of "near-ultralight" hiking. The book uses
        > the author's personal experiences and those of others hiking the
        > Appalachian Trail as a basis for the examples and solutions given.
        >
        > The book is short, and my take on it is that it is most useful to
        > those readers who have actually hiked before. This is not a how-to
        > book, nor does the text go into any great detail in explaining terms
        > and general hiking concepts. Readers who's feet have some hiking
        > experience should find themselves nodding along at the ailments that
        > the author chooses to focus on, if not based on personal experience
        > then based on recognition - how many of us have never encountered a
        > hiker with a bad case of blisters before, or a pack that weighs in at
        > over 50 pounds (20 kg)?
        >
        >
        > Worthwillity:
        >
        > In the book's introduction, the author writes a segment that he
        > titles "Worthwillity," which summarizes his reasons for writing the
        > book, his background and perspective, and his hope that readers will
        > find his book, even a little, useful.
        >
        > I must admit that some of the book's lessons did indeed stick with me
        > while hiking on the trail, and I found myself analyzing the
        > challenges I was experiencing and thinking back to the author's
        > comments.
        >
        > The book delivers a very good primer on blisters, chafing, and knee
        > pain. The author uses his background as a physician, an engineer, and
        > researcher to analyze the causes and anatomy of these three common
        > trail injuries, as well the effect they can have on the hiker. While
        > on the trail, I could reflect back on what the author had written,
        > visualize what was happening in my shoes and in my shorts, and start
        > to orchestrate a plan on how to fix the problem.
        >
        > Just as in the author's case, I found my issues with blisters,
        > chafing, and knee pain becoming the overwhelming center of my thought
        > process during my hikes.
        >
        > The author provides a few words of wisdom in terms of treatment,
        > highlighting potential solutions by using his own hiking experiences
        > as examples.
        >
        > I was able to use the information given in the book to decide on a
        > course of action. In some cases, I followed the author's lead. In
        > others, I worked out "personal answers," just as the author
        > suggested.
        >
        > In the case of blisters, I didn't exactly encounter problems in the
        > traditional sense as much as awakening and exercising the trail born
        > calluses I already had. However, a pair of shoes I'm currently
        > testing for backpackgeartest rub my feet persistently, just below
        > each anklebone. This results in blisters that quickly progress into
        > open, and bloody lesions.
        >
        > In between on-trail testing, I typically gave my feet a week to ten
        > days of rest before using the shoes on uneven surfaces again.
        > However, I was offered a 50 km (31 mile) dayhike challenge that I
        > just couldn't refuse, and I found myself donning the test shoes,
        > intentionally leaving my backup footwear at home, and hitting the
        > trail. After about three miles (5 km), I could feel a sharp pain that
        > I knew was due to the thin layer of new skin under each ankle being
        > ripped off. In another few miles, I could see a bloodstain poking out
        > through my thick hiking socks. "It's only a flesh wound," I exclaimed
        > in my best British accent. The pace of the hike was fast - 50 km (31
        > miles) in ten hours, including breaks - and there simply wasn't the
        > time to properly tend to my wounds. What to do? One of the author's
        > solutions is "layers, and more layers," meaning the presence of a
        > thick defensive wall of padding over the blister that allow the
        > layers to rub against one another without rubbing the skin. I already
        > had two pairs of socks on, so I simply installed a cotton ball over
        > the wounds, duct taped that in place, then put both pairs of socks
        > on, and wrapped each ankle in a short section of elastic bandage. I
        > then hobbled off in an effort to catch up with the rest of the group.
        >
        > Four miles (6 km) later, sweat in my "nether region" got the best of
        > me, and I started to feel the type of chafing that the author
        > calls "fire in the groin." This was hardly the first time I had
        > chafing in this area, but I usually experienced it after longer
        > distance (15 mile or 24 km) hikes in conditions characterized by heat
        > and humidity, not at the ten-mile (16 km) mark during a cool, fall
        > morning. I suspect that, due to the 3 MPH (5 KPH) pace I had to
        > maintain, I sweated more than usual and chafing simply occurred
        > earlier than expected. The author puts a lot of faith in a product
        > called "Bodyglide," - a roll-on lubricant that seals the skin from
        > further wetness. I had nothing to lose, no better ideas, and little
        > time to invest in any solution. I had packed a stick of Bodyglide
        > along in anticipation, and simply jumped into the bushes, shoved the
        > Bodyglide in by pants, and proceeded with application at the first
        > signs of chafing. After about 15 seconds, I was back on the trail. I
        > caught the problem early on, and the Bodyglide worked wonders. No
        > more chafing and no more "fire in the groin" for the remainder of the
        > hike - an additional seven hours of hiking!
        >
        > At about the 18-mile (29 km) mark, my shoe kicked a root. I felt my
        > foot inside my right shoe slide forward along the insole, and a
        > burning sensation ensued - I literally felt the skin along the balls
        > of my feet separating from my toes! The author states that the key
        > ingredients to blisters are moisture, friction, and heat. Well, my
        > feet were sweaty after so many miles without any attention, I had
        > just provided a substantial amount of friction, and I could literally
        > see steam rising off of my foot as I removed it from my shoe. I
        > quickly changed into a fresh pair of both liner and hiking socks that
        > I had in my pack, and my feet immediately felt refreshed, ready to
        > tackle the remaining 13 miles (21 km) of the hike.
        >
        > In terms of knee pain, one of the author's points in his formula for
        > healthy knees is to relieve stress to the knee. I typically get knee
        > pain on the trail after about 18 miles (29 km) of hiking. Just as
        > with my chafing concerns, I would need a quick remedy on my long
        > hike, with no time for experimentation or solutions that didn't work.
        > The author didn't offer any sure-fire shortcuts, so I went into my
        > outfitter and asked for a pair of after-market insoles for my shoes
        > that offered maximum cushioning, and added that I could care less
        > about support. GIVE ME CUSHIONING!!! The salesman returned with an
        > insole made of gel that, according to the manufacturer,
        > provided "superior cushioning and 44% energy return." The insoles
        > were THICK and SPONGY - I was sold. Given all the warnings, lessons,
        > and self-reflection that the book inspired, I was able to come up
        > with personal system that got me through 50 km (31 miles) of trail in
        > ten hours, and free from pain to boot.
        >
        >
        > My Final Thoughts:
        >
        > The book begins with subjects that are physical in nature and
        > therefore easily lend themselves to dissection. The author's training
        > as a physician, engineer, and researcher serve to produce a very
        > thorough primer on the subjects of blisters, chafing and knee pain.
        >
        > Some of the text leaves me scratching my head. For example, in the
        > chapter on chafing the author states:
        >
        > "I have successfully hiked in nylon swimming trunks. These are boxer-
        > like trunks with a polyester brief sewn in. They can be rinsed in
        > stream water, and put back on to dry. In very humid weather, I have
        > even put them back on inside out to dry more quickly. I almost always
        > carry a pair because they make great town clothes and can be
        > important when dealing with chafing during the first few days of a
        > hike. There is a tendency, especially in hot weather, for salt to
        > become encrusted in the material of the brief, making it like
        > sandpaper, and for that to wear away at the skin of each upper leg."
        > Huh? I don't get it? Are they good or bad? The first half of the
        > paragraph has me writing them on a shopping list, and then I read
        > that they are like "sandpaper" and think the author is recommending
        > against them. What gives?
        >
        > As I wrote in my Field Report, I was less than thrilled with the
        > second half of the book. As someone who loves to sleep, finds himself
        > in awe when bad weather moves in, and tells his wife to "go back to
        > sleep," after being woken up in the Sierras and told that a bear that
        > just brushed up against the tent (yes, it was a bear), I had little
        > patience, and found no value, in the author's philosophies on
        > combating loneliness, fear of the dark, nightmares, and other
        > psychological issues (losing the will to hike). I was also less than
        > enthusiastic about the scant level of detail that was given to the
        > topic of lightweight backpacking, especially after seeing the
        > author's thorough work in discussing blisters, chafing, and knee
        > pain. Between the book's introduction, the chapter on losing the will
        > to hike, the chapter on lightweight backpacking, and a summary
        > chapter offering no new information, I found only about 45% of the
        > book to be of interest. That said, I did gain some value from that
        > 45%, as indicated at the beginning of this report.
        >
        > There's also the lack of overall perspective given in terms of the
        > field conditions that the author encountered. The book details
        > experiences from hiking a 200-mile (322 km) segment of the
        > Appalachian Trail in mid-May. It reflects the culmination of
        > experiences gained from hiking anywhere from weekend excursions to
        > that single, two week, 200-mile (322 km) hike. Overall, I got the
        > feeling that most of the lessons had their origins on the author's
        > 200-mile (322 km) hike, taken at a specific point in time and under
        > specific weather conditions, meaning that the author's own
        > experiences were limited. I found myself wishing the author had hiked
        > in mid-July instead of mid-May, hoping that after experiencing
        > intense heat and humidity, drought, and other, more serious
        > challenges, the book would have been directed more towards the sort
        > of concrete issues found in the first half of the book, with less
        > attention paid to psychological or philosophical matters.
        >
        > The author makes no promises that the book is anything more than a
        > description of his discoveries, his failures, and his ideas. In the
        > end, the book's best advice can be summed up by what the author
        > writes in his introduction:
        >
        > "If what I am doing in my hike is working, I keep doing it. If it is
        > not working, then I take on the responsibility to find a better way,
        > and then a better way after that."
        >
        > I found reading "A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike" to be insightful
        > and thought provoking in many areas, and the book proved to be a bit
        > of an inspiration in making me analyze my own issues and in trying to
        > come up with solutions, rather than taking the attitude that any
        > problems encountered on the trail are simply "all part of a good
        > day's hike." The book has given me an excuse to, once again, re-
        > evaluate what I carry and try to lessen the weight in my pack.
        >
        > Finally, the author states that "if a reader of this book finds one
        > of my experiences useful, then I will rejoice." Well, the author can
        > rejoice in that I have found one, even many, of the experiences he
        > shared to be useful. At the same time, I would have liked to hear
        > more. I wish that the author had tried hiking that 200-miles (322 km)
        > across at least a few different seasons, just to give readers a set
        > of more well rounded opinions.
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
      • edwardripleyduggan
        Andy and Chuck One edit I noted Readers who s feet have some hiking ... Readers whose feet.... Ted.
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 1, 2006
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          Andy and Chuck

          One edit I noted

          Readers who's feet have some hiking
          > experience should find themselves nodding along at the ailments that
          > the author chooses to focus on,

          Readers whose feet....

          Ted.
        • Chuck Carnes
          Yep... good catch Ted. Thanks!
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 1, 2006
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            Yep... good catch Ted. Thanks!


            --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "edwardripleyduggan"
            <erd@w...> wrote:
            >
            > Andy and Chuck
            >
            > One edit I noted
            >
            > Readers who's feet have some hiking
            > > experience should find themselves nodding along at the ailments that
            > > the author chooses to focus on,
            >
            > Readers whose feet....
            >
            > Ted.
            >
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