Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

FR - Sierra Designs Echo Sleeping Bag

Expand Messages
  • Kenny B
    Carol Here s my FR for the Sierra Designs Echo Sleeping Bag. I ve also uploaded it to the test folder. Thanks in advance for the edits. Cheers Kenny B
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 30, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Carol

      Here's my FR for the Sierra Designs Echo Sleeping Bag.
      I've also uploaded it to the test folder. Thanks in
      advance for the edits.

      Cheers
      Kenny B

      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/FR%20-%20Sierra%20Design%20Echo%20Sleeping%20Bag/

      Sierra Designs Echo Sleeping Bag
      Field Report
      January 27, 2006

      Personal Biographical Information:

      Name: Ken Bigelow
      Age: 27
      Gender: Male
      Height: 5' 9" (1.8 m)
      Weight: 205 lbs (93 kg)
      Email address: krb84108 (at) yahoo (dot) com
      City, State, Country: Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

      Backpacking Background:

      I was first dragged on a backpacking trip eight years
      ago and have been addicted to it ever since. My
      adventures vary in length from a weekend to over two
      weeks. I am slowly shifting my backpacking style to a
      lightweight approach. I recently upgraded to a
      hammock to reduce weight. From spring through fall I
      typically backpack in the mountains or desert, while
      in winter I often go snowshoeing. I see a wide
      variety of climates ranging from -5 F (-20 C) with
      snow to 90 F (32 C) and sunny and just about
      everything in between.

      Product Information:

      Manufacturer: Sierra Designs
      Website: www.sierradesigns.com
      Manufacturer's Temperature Rating: -20 F (-29 C)
      Size Tested: Regular
      Insulation: 800 - Fill Goose Down
      Zipper Side: Left
      Shell Material: 40D Nylon
      Liner Material: 40D Polyester
      Year of Manufacture: 2005
      Color: Purple & Blue
      MSRP: $400 (US)

      Sierra Designs Echo Sleeping Bag
      Manufacturer's Website
      Hang Tag
      Measured

      Bag Weight
      4 lbs 5 oz (1.96 kg)
      4 lbs 2 oz (1.87 kg)
      4 lbs 4 oz (1.93 kg)

      Compression Stuff Sack Weight
      N/A
      N/A
      5.8 oz (0.164 kg)

      Stuff Size
      10" x 20" (25.4 cm x 51 cm)
      10" x 20" (25.4 cm x 51 cm) 10" x 19" (25.4 cm x 48.3
      cm)

      Inside Length
      80" (203 cm)
      80" (203 cm)
      80" (203 cm)

      Shoulder Girth
      62" (157 cm)
      62" (157 cm)
      62" (157 cm)

      Hip Girth
      57" (145 cm)
      57" (145 cm)
      56" (142 cm)

      Footbox Girth
      43" (109 cm)
      40" (102 cm)
      41" (104 cm)

      Fill Weight
      40 oz (1.134 kg)
      37 oz (1.049 kg)
      N/A


      Field Conditions:

      I have used the Sierra Designs Echo in Zion National
      Park, the Uinta Mountains and just outside of Arches
      National Park. Low temperatures have ranged from -12
      F (-24 C) to 28 F (-2 C). Elevations have ranged from
      5,000 ft (1,500 m) to 8,000 ft (2,400 m). I have used
      the Echo in both a hammock as well a tent. I have
      experienced heavy rain, a light rain-snow mix and had
      clear skies when sleeping in the Echo, but was in a
      shelter and not fully exposed to the precipitation
      when sleeping in the bag. The terrain has included
      snow/ice covered trails, wet and muddy corridors and
      dirt paths.

      Field Report:

      I first used the Echo while spending four days in the
      Kolob Canyons region of Zion National Park. I used
      the Echo in my Hennessey Hammock and experienced low
      temperatures between 22 F (-6 C) and 28 F (-2 C). I
      left my bag liner and thermal baselayers at home for
      this trip as I did not expect to encounter any harsh
      conditions that would necessitate bringing them. I
      did experience one afternoon of heavy rain, but the
      Echo remained dry throughout the trip. The Echo was
      so warm that I had to unzip it to remain comfortable
      (even though I was only wearing a tee shirt and
      regular hiking pants). I used the Echo more as a
      quilt for the trip as it was a little too warm and I
      was sweating when it was fully zipped. The Echo
      remained dry inside, but my sleeping pad underneath
      me, was slightly damp every morning. The dampness was
      from my perspiration during the night which makes me
      believe that the Drizone Laminated Fabric does an
      excellent job of allowing moisture to escape.

      The Echo was so warm I used it to help dry out my
      socks and warm my feet. Exploring the canyons
      required crossing and even wading in several creeks.
      My feet were freezing and wet when I pulled into camp
      at the end of the day. When I arrived at camp I dried
      my feet as best I could and quickly climbed inside the
      Echo. It wasn't long before my feet were nice and
      toasty warm. This was a wonderful feeling at the end
      of a cold, wet day. My moist socks were completely
      dry within a couple of hours. I spent three nights in
      the Echo with my arms, feet, and for one night, my
      entire upper body were bare and exposed to the bag's
      material. The interior texture is extremely soft and
      comfortable against my skin. Is was so comfy that I
      often drifted asleep while reading in it at six in the
      evening, which is odd as typically do not go to sleep
      until after ten.

      I intended to travel to Bryce Canyon National Park for
      the holiday, but an unusually warm December left the
      Park with insufficient snow to go snowshoeing. With
      snowshoeing no longer an option, I decided to hit
      Arches National Park as the trails would be less muddy
      for hiking purposes. Due to the lack of tall, sturdy
      trees in the area I switched my shelter to a tent for
      this trip. I didn't initially use my sleeping pad,
      but did use a thermal top while sleeping in the Echo.
      I finally broke out the pad in the middle of the night
      due to discomfort and not cold. A rain-snow mix fell
      in the evening, but again the Echo was not subjected
      to the precipitation. The low temperature for the
      trip was 16 F (-9 C). The Echo kept me warm all
      night, but the discomfort of sleeping on the hard
      ground made me regret not bringing my sleeping pad
      along. It certainly seemed colder without the pad and
      I used the draft collar for the first time. The draft
      collar does an excellent job of insulating my lower
      body. Below the draft collar I was pretty warm, while
      my face was quite chilled. To compensate, I only had
      to tighten the hood's cinch cord. I attempted this
      while drowsy and accidentally tightened the draft
      collar (as its cinch cord is close in proximity to the
      hood's cord). I finally regained some coherency and
      adjusted the correct cord before falling back to
      sleep.

      In mid-January a friend and I headed to the Uintas for
      a quick overnighter. We snowshoed in a short distance
      and set up camp. We experienced minor snowfall on and
      off again throughout the day, but I kept the Echo dry
      inside my pack until the evening. Outside the shelter
      the overnight low plummeted to -12 F (-24 C). Inside
      the tent our body heat made it slightly warmer, but it
      wasn't exactly shorts and tee shirt temperatures by
      any stretch of the imagination. I tried to fall
      asleep wearing a full set of thermal baselayers,
      hiking pants, my down jacket, my Sierra Designs down
      booties and a balaclava. I also used a sleeping bag
      liner as I only had my Therm-a-Rest Ridgerest for
      insulation against the ice beneath me. Again I found
      it too warm to sleep and had to remove both the down
      jacket and my balaclava. I even undid the draft
      collar during the night and just cinched the hood's
      cord to achieve a more equal temperature distribution
      across my body. This configuration was unsuccessful
      as I awoke a few times during the night with a cold
      face. I compensated by rolling over so my face was
      buried in the hood's insulation and fell back to
      sleep.

      Sleeping on the hard ice was uncomfortable and I did
      toss and turn frequently during the night. For the
      most part I had no problems doing so. I slept on my
      back, side and stomach at least for a brief stint in
      each position. In the early dawn hours I even curled
      up in the fetal position for a bit. The Echo
      accommodated my constant adjustments and did not
      hinder my body except my arms. Laying my crossed arms
      on my chest provided the little resistance to
      adjusting my position, but I find my arms fall asleep
      quickly and the configuration slightly uncomfortable.
      When sleeping in a mummy bag I prefer to keep my arms
      at my sides, but this substantially prohibits movement
      within the bag. I should note that this problem was
      really not a surprise to me as every mummy bag I've
      ever tried has the same issue. I certainly would not
      have traded the warmth provided by the bag for
      additional movement in those temperatures. I would,
      however, like to see Sierra Designs incorporate their
      flex design into the Echo.

      Even with all my tossing and turning in the night, I
      was unable to detect any cold spots in the Echo. The
      baffled construction has yet to send all the
      insulation to one portion of the sleeping bag. I
      initially thought that the hood would prevent me from
      comfortably sleeping on my sides or stomach while in
      the Echo. I have found this presumption to be
      completely inaccurate as I can twist my body around
      inside the Echo and sleep in almost any position I
      please. The hood adjusts to fit my head whether my
      face is staring at the sky, nestled in the side of the
      hood, or buried down inside the hood when I'm lying on
      my stomach. Overall I was impressed with the way the
      Echo adjusts to me instead of me having to adjust to
      it.

      In the morning, frozen condensation covered the tent's
      interior and occasionally it dripped down onto the
      Echo. When I finally mustered the courage to crawl
      out of the bag I found four or five wet spots the
      dripping tent had created on the bag. I had been
      unable to detect these while in the bag which makes me
      believe the Drizone technology protects me pretty well
      against minor moisture while I'm in the bag. The
      teeth on the zipper were not so lucky. Near one of
      the wet spots the teeth were completely frozen and I
      was only able to unzip until the slider reached this
      region. The slider would not proceed past this point
      so I crawled out of the bag with it still partially
      zipped up. After thawing the zipper it functions
      perfectly normal.

      Testing Location:

      I will continue testing the sleeping bag on weekend
      hiking trips where car camping is required and
      backpacking trips. In February I hope to go out for
      at least two overnight trips. They will likely be in
      the Uinta or Wasatch Mountains. I still hope to make
      it down to Bryce Canyon National Park for some
      snowshoeing/camping before the test period is over.
      The terrain will mostly consist of snow covered
      trails, off-trail snowshoeing and may include wet and
      muddy corridors, rocky terrain and slickrock.
      Temperatures should range from -5 F (-20 C) to 40 F (4
      C), but could easily be colder. I will likely see all
      types of weather ranging from heavy snow to sunny.
      The elevations experienced should be between 4,000
      feet (1,200 m) and 11,000 feet (3,300 m).

      Testing Plan:

      For the remaining test period I hope to answer a few
      more questions about the characteristics of the Echo
      Sleeping Bag:

      Performance - Is the rating provided by the
      manufacturer close to accurate? Will it dry out
      quickly? Do the zippers allow for easy zipping and
      unzipping? Will the Snag Free Zipper Tracks prevent
      the sliders from snagging on the fabric? Do the
      Glow-in-the-Dark Zipper Pulls allow the zippers to be
      easily found and used in the dark? Can the zippers be
      easily operated while wearing gloves? Will the bag's
      interior dry quickly and effectively? Is the zipper
      drafty or do the dual draft tubes keep out the wind?
      Will the pad locks prevent the Echo from sliding off
      the pads during the night? Does the bag compress
      simply for easy packing? Is the compression sack
      waterproof?

      Comfort - I tend to sleep cold so I when it is
      extremely cold I place all my extra clothing under my
      feet at the bottom of my bag. Will I still have room
      to continue this tradition?

      Durability - Will either the sleeping bag or stuff
      sack rip, tear, or in any other way be damaged during
      the test period? Will loft be lost with continued
      packing and unpacking? Over the test period will the
      bag lose its compressibility? Will the insulating
      properties of the bag decrease over four months of
      use? Will the baffle construction deteriorate and
      allow the down insulation to migrate throughout the
      bag? Will the sliders need replacing after multiple
      uses? Will the down fill material escape from the bag
      over time? How often will the bag need to be washed?
      Is this easy to do? Will washing cause any
      deterioration?

      Summary:

      The Sierra Designs Echo is very warm and comfortable
      sleeping bag for colder temperatures. I've used the
      Echo in a wide range of temperatures and found that
      the bag allows the user great versatility through
      adjusting its zippers, draft collar and hood. One can
      also incorporate different insulating and layer
      systems to comfortably sleep in a variety of
      temperatures. The bag has pretty good flexibility as
      it allows me to toss and turn during the night and the
      hood adjusts to fit my head and not vice versa. The
      Drizone laminated fabric seems to both breathe well
      and keep minor moisture out. Overall I'm very
      impressed with the bag and look forward to testing it
      more in the following months.

      I would like to thank Sierra Designs and
      BackpackGearTest for allowing me to participate in
      testing the Echo Sleeping Bag.


      __________________________________________________
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
      http://mail.yahoo.com
    • cmcrooker
      Sierra Designs Echo Sleeping Bag Field Report January 27, 2006 Ken Bigelow Hey Kenny, I snowshoed in along the Red Pine Lakes trail last week and camped.
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 1 11:25 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Sierra Designs Echo Sleeping Bag
        Field Report
        January 27, 2006
        Ken Bigelow

        Hey Kenny,
        I snowshoed in along the Red Pine Lakes trail last week and camped.
        Gorgeous - especially to a desert girl. Can you recommend another
        good trail in the Wasatch where avvy gear is not required?

        Good writeup! Minor edit suggestions follow enclosed between *** ***
        symbols.
        Carol, Monitor

        I spent three nights in the Echo with my arms, feet, and for one
        night, my entire upper body were bare and exposed to the bag's
        material.
        ***Reads better if you remove "were" ***

        Laying my crossed arms on my chest provided the little resistance to
        adjusting my position, but I find my arms fall asleep
        ***I think this sentence works better if you remove "the" in front
        of resistance, but I may be misreading this. ***
      • Kenny B
        Hi Carol Thanks for the edits! They are incorporated and uploaded. Try Big Cottonwood Canyon for less avvy danger. Both Desolation Lake and Lake Blanche are
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 1 5:59 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Carol

          Thanks for the edits! They are incorporated and
          uploaded. Try Big Cottonwood Canyon for less avvy
          danger. Both Desolation Lake and Lake Blanche are
          beautiful trails. You could also do Dog Lake or
          Mineral Fork. I actually prefer White Pine in Lil'
          Cottonwood to Red Pine (both are awesome), but an
          avalanche killed a kid up there a few winters back so
          it's certainly more dangerous. Glad to hear you
          enjoyed your trip.

          Cheers
          Kenny B

          --- cmcrooker <carol@...> wrote:

          > Hey Kenny,
          > I snowshoed in along the Red Pine Lakes trail last
          > week and camped.
          > Gorgeous - especially to a desert girl. Can you
          > recommend another
          > good trail in the Wasatch where avvy gear is not
          > required?



          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          http://mail.yahoo.com
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.