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FR: Molehill Mountain Hooded Fleece Kid's Jacket - André

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  • André Corterier
    also not in the test folder... Molehill Mt. Equipment Hooded Fleece Kid s Jacket Field Report by André Corterier Date: 2005-DEC-26 ... Personal Biographical
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 3, 2006
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      also not in the test folder...


      Molehill Mt. Equipment "Hooded Fleece" Kid's Jacket
      Field Report by André Corterier
      Date: 2005-DEC-26

      ----------

      Personal Biographical Information:
      Name: André Corterier
      Gender: M
      Age: 33
      Height: 1,85 m (6 ft 1 in)
      Weight: 80 kg (175 lb)
      Email: andreDOTcorterierATfreenetDOTde
      Home: Bonn, Germany

      Name: Renée Corterier
      Gender: F
      Age: 4
      Height: 1,09 m (43 in)
      Weight: 19 kg (42 lb)
      Email: -
      Home: Bonn, Germany


      Backpacking Background:
      I began backpacking in my late teens using Europe's "InterRail"-
      System – weight hardly mattered, as we were on trains a lot. I
      recently rediscovered backpacking and have started out slowly –
      single-day 24 km (15 mi) jaunts by myself or even shorter hikes in
      the company of my little daughter. I am getting started on longer
      hikes, as a lightweight packer and hammock-camper. I've begun
      upgrading my old gear and am now shooting for a dry FSO weight
      (everything carried From the Skin Out except food, fuel and water) of
      about 10 kg (22 lb) for three-season camping. Not quite there yet.

      Renée began "hiking" at the age of 1 1/2 years. This consisted of
      walking short distances between "stroller stops" to play in the snow
      or explore the banks of a creek with her dad pushing her in the
      stroller for most of the hike. Lately, she's begun walking the entire
      stretch of shorter hikes (a few km/mi at most), though she insists on
      a break with a strung hammock and a hot meal on a camping stove
      (those, and the ability to drink from the water bladder's drinking
      tube whenever her dad picks her up for a moment are what make hiking
      so cool). Her longest expedition so far was a 30 km (19 mi)
      overnighter on which she carried her own rain gear and insulation
      layer. She has spent nights in a tent and a hammock as well as
      underneath a tarp and the open sky.

      ----------

      Year of Manufacture: 2005
      Manufacturer: Molehill Mountain Equipment
      URL: http://www.molehillmtn.com
      MSRP: 54.99 USD for size 4/5
      Colour: "Red Clover" (pink, with violet accents)

      Comparisons: - scale accurate to 1 g (0.04 oz)
      listed weight: none given
      measured weight: 235 g (8.3 oz) for size 4/5

      Introduction:
      This is a zippered kid's jacket with a hood. As such, it has no
      surprising features: A zipper down the front, two handwarmer pockets
      (not zippered), and the hood. It's in a two-tone colour pattern. In
      our case (according to the choice of my daughter) it is made mostly
      of pink fleece, offset by elastic hemlines at the bottom and around
      the hood and wrists in purple. The zipper is in purple as well, as is
      an insert along the sides of the jacket which extends along the lower
      side of the upper arms. From just above the elbow to the wrists, this
      is covered by a tougher fabric in the same colour. You may wish to
      take a look at my Initial Report, which features a more detailed
      description.

      Field Experience:
      My daughter has worn the jacket a *lot* in the recent past. During
      the early days of the testing period, it was worn as an outside layer
      come the evening, when it got colder. When the cold combined with
      wind and/or rain, she wore it under a waterproof/breathable jacket.
      Lately she has mostly worn it as a middle thermal layer though she
      still takes off the outer layer when playing in the sun.

      The Molehill Mountain jacket has accompanied us on a Halloween
      overnight hike of about 30 km (19 mi). It saw wind and rain and a
      good bit of use on that trip, though it was warm enough for most of
      the first day not to wear it.

      Nevertheless, she wore it in the beginning of that first day and
      towards the end, as the sun was coming down and temperatures dropped.
      Temps went down to about 10 C (50 F) or thereabouts, and she was fine
      wearing only a wicking T-shirt and the Molehill Jacket (with the hood
      up after nightfall). Of course, she was moving around a good bit
      during this time. For the period of our supper break (stationary,
      after nightfall), it appeared warranted to ask her to put on her rain
      jacket as well for additional insulation. During that first day, as
      long as temps stayed between 10 and 20 C (50 and 70 F) or
      thereabouts, she was wearing the hooded jacket continually and never
      seemed to experience cold or overheating. It also seemed to move well
      with her - at least she never wanted to take it off.

      The next day started cold and rainy, with temps below 10 C (50 F).
      She wore her rain jacket over it (which is water vapor permeable) and
      appeared nice and cosy in it while slogging through puddles with me.
      Exiting the woods we had to cross an open section of a few kilometers
      (even fewer miles) where a chill wind was blowing. I was very happy
      to have the Molehill Mountain jacket with us. It provided a good
      insulation layer underneath her rain jacket. She walked the entire
      stretch, with my Buff over her neck and face and the hoods of both
      the Molehill fleece jacket and her rain jacket up. I was particularly
      happy about the well-fitting hood because heat conservation was the
      key factor on this stretch of our trip in keeping the experience
      enjoyable on the whole.

      She has also been wearing it to her daycare center, where she usually
      wore it when playing outside and took it off when coming inside.
      During a long and beautiful fall with temps often between 10 and 20 C
      (50 and 70 F), she just put the Molehill Mountain jacket on over
      whatever she was wearing inside, added shoes and was good to go. She
      did the same when at home (often accompanied by me). Whenever I felt
      that it was getting a wee bit cold, I asked her to put on the hood
      and that seemed to do the trick.

      Now that the outside temperatures hover around freezing, the hooded
      fleece is her main insulation layer, which she wears along with her
      rain jacket over whatever she was wearing indoors. We add gloves, of
      course, and sometimes her own Buff (mostly for protecting her face,
      particularly when I take her to her daycare center on my bicycle,
      which creates a lot of headwind).

      Wind Protection:
      On its own, the jacket provides very little wind protection. This is
      also my experience with my own fleece layers - wind seems to
      penetrate rather well. I have confirmed this with holding my own hand
      into the fleece jacket in a wind (at which point I was still able to
      feel the wind). So it appears that while the jacket opens up a broad
      temperature spectrum in which my daughter is comfy with it, a strong
      wind narrows that window severely, effectively requiring a windproof
      shell over it. As I tend to have this along in case of rain anyway,
      that does not create a problem for me or her.

      Warmth:
      The first time my daughter wore this jacket as an insulation layer
      under her w/b shell, she complained that she was getting too warm
      under it. This was in late October, on a 20 minute bike ride at maybe
      15 C (60 F). Since then, she's mostly been wearing it as an
      insulation layer in temperatures just above freezing. As such, the
      Hooded Fleece jacket has proven quite effective. I am particularly
      enamored of the hood, which frames my daughter's face well, does not
      slide over her face when she turns her head and provides that extra
      warmth where it counts the most. While my daughter agrees that the
      hood fits very well, she still often takes it off under circumstances
      where I would prefer her to leave it on. Kids...

      When it gets really cold and windy, I have been able to use a Buff
      with the hood of the Hooded Jacket in a way which masked most of her
      face without generating too much discomfort (with everything held in
      place by her bicycle helmet). The last time we did the trip to her
      daycare center on my bicycle in sub-freezing temperatures, she was
      still freezing on her face (she spent much of the ride with her
      gloved hands in her face). But when asked, upon arrival, she stated
      that she'd been warm everywhere else. And when asked by the people at
      the daycare center wether we'd truly come by bicycle, she said: "Yes,
      and I almost didn't freeze at all!".

      As we are beginning to approach the rating of the winter sleeping bag
      she's testing, I am reassured by having this jacket along. Should we
      get to the point where the bag no longer provides sufficient
      insulation, I am sure that putting this jacket on will get her
      through the night in comfort.

      Wicking Ability:
      Sweat buildup has never been a problem. In fact, I have never noticed
      her sweating in the jacket.

      Comfort:
      The jacket's material, after several washings, is still soft to the
      touch. The jacket remains one of my daughter's favourite pieces of
      outdoor apparel. It is also my favourite piece of her outdoor
      apparel, as I regard its functionalitly superior to the rest of her
      clothes. When testing a winter sleeping bag for her under
      circumstances which were unlikely to push the envelope, she used the
      rolled up jacket as her pillow. The temperature range in which
      wearing this jacket (with the zipper up) is comfortable for her seems
      large, also: While I have seen her take off her hood without
      prompting, she's not using the zipper much for temperature control. I
      have noted that wearing the jacket with the zipper entirely open does
      not seem to work well as the weight of the hood drags the jacket over
      her shoulders, causing the jacket to slide.

      Durability:
      The jacket has seen a good bit of use and shows literally no signs of
      wear. While my daughter may not be the hardest of kids on clothes,
      she does run around, climb and generally behave wildly with the rest
      of them, so I consider this praiseworthy. It's been washed several
      times (at 40 C / 104 F) without having shrunken one bit (the size of
      the jacket in relation to the size of my daughter is such that I
      would notice even very minor shrinkage). Stains of various kinds of
      food and ground cover have washed out easily. I also note that the
      jacket exits the washing machine (after a 1200 rpm spinning cycle)
      almost dry. The reinforced elbow areas seem to be doing their work. I
      remember noticing her rubbing those across edges made of concrete
      when climbing, but this does not seem to have had any effect on the
      jacket.

      ----------

      Pros/Cons:
      Pros: Warms well without causing overheating, still soft, durable,
      good fit (particularly the hood).
      Cons: None so far (still).
    • AsABat
      Andre- Thanks for a fine report. A few edits and it s ready to go (when we get the ok for uploading to the site again). Thanks, Bill Jeffrey Monitor The next
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 5, 2006
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        Andre-

        Thanks for a fine report. A few edits and it's ready to go (when we
        get the ok for uploading to the site again).

        Thanks,
        Bill Jeffrey
        Monitor

        The next day started cold and rainy, with temps below 10 C (50 F).
        She wore her rain jacket over it (which is water vapor permeable)

        ###EDIT? I'd prefer to see the parenthetical phrase next to rain
        jacket rather than it, as in "She wore her rain jacket (which is
        water vapor permeable) over it…" This makes it more clear that the
        rain jacket is breathable rather than the fleece jacket (which, of
        course, it as well). Your call.

        Warmth:
        The first time my daughter wore this jacket as an insulation layer
        under her w/b shell,

        ###COMMENT: You might spell out "waterproof/breathable" here rather
        than just "w/b."

        When it gets really cold and windy, I have been able to use a Buff
        with the hood of the Hooded Jacket in a way which masked most of her
        face without generating too much discomfort (with everything held in
        place by her bicycle helmet). The last time we did the trip to her
        daycare center on my bicycle in sub-freezing temperatures, she was
        still freezing on her face (she spent much of the ride with her
        gloved hands in her face). But when asked, upon arrival, she stated
        that she'd been warm everywhere else. And when asked by the people at
        the daycare center wether

        ###EDIT: whether

        we'd truly come by bicycle, she said: "Yes,
        and I almost didn't freeze at all!".

        Comfort:
        The jacket's material, after several washings, is still soft to the
        touch. The jacket remains one of my daughter's favourite pieces of
        outdoor apparel. It is also my favourite piece of her outdoor
        apparel, as I regard its functionalitly

        ###EDIT: functionality

        superior to the rest of her
        clothes. When testing a winter sleeping bag for her under
        circumstances which were unlikely to push the envelope, she used the
        rolled up jacket as her pillow. The temperature range in which
        wearing this jacket (with the zipper up) is comfortable for her seems
        large, also: While I have seen her take off her hood without
        prompting, she's not using the zipper much for temperature control. I
        have noted that wearing the jacket with the zipper entirely open does
        not seem to work well as the weight of the hood drags the jacket over
        her shoulders, causing the jacket to slide.
      • AsABat
        [Forgot to say EDIT in the subject line. Oops, sorry.] ... at ... seems ... I ... does ... over
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 5, 2006
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          [Forgot to say "EDIT" in the subject line. Oops, sorry.]


          --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, " AsABat" <wjj2001@y...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Andre-
          >
          > Thanks for a fine report. A few edits and it's ready to go (when we
          > get the ok for uploading to the site again).
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Bill Jeffrey
          > Monitor
          >
          > The next day started cold and rainy, with temps below 10 C (50 F).
          > She wore her rain jacket over it (which is water vapor permeable)
          >
          > ###EDIT? I'd prefer to see the parenthetical phrase next to rain
          > jacket rather than it, as in "She wore her rain jacket (which is
          > water vapor permeable) over it…" This makes it more clear that the
          > rain jacket is breathable rather than the fleece jacket (which, of
          > course, it as well). Your call.
          >
          > Warmth:
          > The first time my daughter wore this jacket as an insulation layer
          > under her w/b shell,
          >
          > ###COMMENT: You might spell out "waterproof/breathable" here rather
          > than just "w/b."
          >
          > When it gets really cold and windy, I have been able to use a Buff
          > with the hood of the Hooded Jacket in a way which masked most of her
          > face without generating too much discomfort (with everything held in
          > place by her bicycle helmet). The last time we did the trip to her
          > daycare center on my bicycle in sub-freezing temperatures, she was
          > still freezing on her face (she spent much of the ride with her
          > gloved hands in her face). But when asked, upon arrival, she stated
          > that she'd been warm everywhere else. And when asked by the people
          at
          > the daycare center wether
          >
          > ###EDIT: whether
          >
          > we'd truly come by bicycle, she said: "Yes,
          > and I almost didn't freeze at all!".
          >
          > Comfort:
          > The jacket's material, after several washings, is still soft to the
          > touch. The jacket remains one of my daughter's favourite pieces of
          > outdoor apparel. It is also my favourite piece of her outdoor
          > apparel, as I regard its functionalitly
          >
          > ###EDIT: functionality
          >
          > superior to the rest of her
          > clothes. When testing a winter sleeping bag for her under
          > circumstances which were unlikely to push the envelope, she used the
          > rolled up jacket as her pillow. The temperature range in which
          > wearing this jacket (with the zipper up) is comfortable for her
          seems
          > large, also: While I have seen her take off her hood without
          > prompting, she's not using the zipper much for temperature control.
          I
          > have noted that wearing the jacket with the zipper entirely open
          does
          > not seem to work well as the weight of the hood drags the jacket
          over
          > her shoulders, causing the jacket to slide.
          >
        • Andrew Priest
          ... Yes please. Thanks Sir Andrew [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 6, 2006
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            At 02:14 PM 6/01/2006, you wrote:
            >Andre-
            >
            >
            >
            >###COMMENT: You might spell out "waterproof/breathable" here rather
            >than just "w/b."

            Yes please.

            Thanks
            Sir Andrew


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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