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Re: The daughter of Agamemnon

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  • Rick D.
    You can try telling people you live in Alta Vermont ;-) (The New England Yankee accent might be tough, though.) --Rick ... be :-(
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 31, 2005
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      You can try telling people you live in Alta Vermont ;-)

      (The New England Yankee accent might be tough, though.)

      --Rick

      --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, Marie-Noëlle Augendre
      <augendre.bgt@g...> wrote:
      >
      > I guess this apply also to "testing in Canada by a Canadian-to-
      be" :-(
      >
      > Marie-Noëlle
      >
      > On 10/31/05, Andy Mytys <amytys@h...> wrote:
      > >
      > > ....
      > >
      > > - Women only
      > > - U.S. Testers Only!!!
      > > - Newbie rule APPLIES
      > >
      >
      >
      > --
      > Marie-Noëlle
      > Wilderness Addict
      > http://mnaugendre.blogspot.com/
      >
    • Andy Mytys
      ... Lynne, It all depends on how one words the description of test/field conditions. Those US temp ratings are based on no wind, and something like 2 inches
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 31, 2005
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        --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, Lynne Durham
        <lynnedurham@g...> wrote:
        >
        > Andy,
        > I'm curious how you'll decide if "temps are cold enough to give
        > this bag a workout." Checking average winter lows, even Denali's
        > *average* winter low is above -15F (-26C). Yeah, records are much
        > lower...but how would we decide something like this?
        > Lynne
        >

        Lynne,


        It all depends on how one words the description of test/field
        conditions. Those US temp ratings are based on no wind, and
        something like 2 inches of pad underneath. Some testers sleep warm,
        others cold. Then there's the number of consecutive days in the
        field, as each day out the bag may lose loft due to the down getting
        moisture from the body into it. What about folks sleeping in snow
        caves? That introduces a lot of moisture to the situation as well.
        SD also encourages customers to sleep outside the tent... well, that
        exposure might knock that effective temp rating back a bit.

        And remember, "average" low is just that... AVERAGE. In Northern
        Michigan, for example, an "average low" in Jan/Feb might be 10 F.
        Check the daily logs, and you'll find some days where the daily low
        hit -15 F, and others where it was 15-20 F for a few days. There's
        no way I'd head out on the High Country Pathway in Jan/Feb w/o being
        prepared to weather temps that were harsher than even -20 F. (I'm
        using Michigan examples here because both Lynne and I are from MI).
        Moving into Canada, temps regularly hit -40 F (talk to Gail about
        this one... brrrrrrrrrrrrr).

        I'm not going to give you a formula here. Suffice it to say that I
        need three testers, and I know enough about winter camping to be able
        to read a detailed set of field conditions and determine if it's
        going to be a good match for the product or not. It's up to the
        tester to provide those field conditions though. You'd be surprised
        how many apps just say something general like "below freezing"... w/o
        supporting field conditions, an application isn't seriously
        considered.

        I'll compare the field conditions and other relavent information
        given in each application, and pick the best three... just like
        always.
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