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74158IR - GSI Outdoors Glacier Tea Kettle - Mark Thompson

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  • Mark Thompson
    Oct 6, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Lori,
      For your editing pleasure, please find my Initial Report below or by clicking this link http://tinyurl.com/9tvtu5x

      Best,
      Mark


      GSI OUTDOORS GLACIER STAINLESS TEA KETTL
      TEST SERIES BY MARK THOMPSON
      IR
      October 05, 2012
       
      TESTER INFORMATION
       
      NAME: Mark Thompson
      EMAIL: markthompson 242 at gmail dot com
      AGE: 48
      LOCATION: Parker, Colorado, USA
      GENDER: M
      HEIGHT: 6' 0" (2.10 m)
      WEIGHT: 190 lb (86.20 kg)
       
      Outdoor adventures started for me at an early age, my passions have grown to include backpacking, rock climbing, hiking, hunting, fishing, canoeing, cycling, skiing and snowshoeing.  Most of my adventures presently take place in Colorado's amazing Rocky Mountains.  For trail hikes, my pack typically weighs 15 lbs/7 kg (summer/fall), 25 lbs/11 kg (winter/spring) and trail speed ranges from 2.5 - 4 mph (4 - 6 km/h) depending on elevation gain.  For backpack trips, my pack weighs 40 - 45 lbs (18 - 20 kg) and my trail speed drops to 1.5 - 3.0 mph (2 - 5 km/h).
       
       
      INITIAL REPORT
                  
      PRODUCT INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS
       
      Manufacturer: GSI Outdoors
      Year of Manufacture: 2012
      Manufacturer's Website: <<HYPERLINK GOES HERE - "http://www.gsioutdoors.com">>
      MSRP: US $22.95
      Listed Weight: 9.3 oz (264 g)
      Measured Weight: 8.9 oz (252 g)
      Other details:
      capacity: 1 quart (32 oz/ 0.95 L)
      Material: stainless steel

      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 1">>
       
      INITIAL IMPRESSIONS
       
      This is a neat little kettle that is advertised to be able to withstand the rigors of backpacking and the traditional camp fire.  Being the type of backpacker that doesn't typically use a fire for cooking (unless it is for a steak) I am eager to give this a try.

      The kettle is fitted with a folding handle and includes a cam-type action to keep the handle upright and securely in place during use, but not too stiff to fold it out of the way.  The lid fits quite securely without being troublesome and the spout appears to be sufficient for pouring without being excessively large when it comes to packing up camp and heading down the trail.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 2">>

       
      TRYING IT OUT
       
      After unpacking the kettle, I tried a variety of packing options as I certainly do not want to waste valuable pack space for just a piece of cook ware.  I found that a small size isobutyl fuel canister will fit with the lid closed, unfortunately though, the large (8 oz/227 g) fuel canister is just slightly too tall to fit inside the kettle with the lid closed.
       
      TESTING STRATEGY
       
      Most of my back woods cooking merely involves boiling water so I am really looking forward to seeing how well the kettle performs.  I am quite interested to see how well the material resists camp fire soot as I don't relish the thought of putting soot covered cookware in my pack, nor do I wish to spend time scrubbing cookware in the back country (or anywhere for that matter).
       
      SUMMARY
       
      This appears to be a neat kettle with the outdoors and those who venture there in mind.

      Pros:
      - compact
      - folding handle with camming mechanism to stay upright

      Cons:
      - none
       
       
       
      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2012.  All rights reserved.




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