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San Francisco Choral Artists present "Voices of Women"

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  • rebeccasfca
    Voices of Women Experience Voices of Women , an unusual SF Choral Artists program of music entirely by, for, and about women. The program includes old and
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 25, 2013
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      "Voices of Women"

      Experience "Voices of Women", an unusual SF Choral Artists program of music entirely by, for, and about women. The program includes old and new masters, from Renaissance composer Maddalena Casulana to the group's first female Composer-Not-in-Residence, Eleanor Aversa. Featuring both unknown talent and eminent composers, including Meredith Monk, Fanny Hensel, Chen Yi, Alice Parker, and Pauline Oliveros. Works about women include the world premiere of "anima gaia" by Composer-in-Residence Mark Winges and the beloved "Hymn to St. Cecilia" by Benjamin Britten, a masterpiece celebrating the patron saint of musicians. Don't miss this beautiful concert and bring along your mothers, daughters, sisters, and aunts.

      San Francisco: Sat, Mar 2, 8 PM
      St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church
      To Buy Tickets Visit:
      www.brownpapertickets.com/event/315377

      Palo Alto: Sat, Mar 9, 8 PM
      St. Mark's Episcopal Church
      To Buy Tickets Visit:
      www.brownpapertickets.com/event/315392

      Oakland: Sun, Mar 10, 4 PM
      St. Paul's Episcopal Church
      To Buy Tickets Visit:
      www.brownpapertickets.com/event/315397

      Hear jazz, folk, early music, improvisation, works for men's and women's chorus, sound effects, a text-less piece, and even a work about a double helix. Pauline Oliveros's works "Humming Piece" and "Rock Piece" are particularly unusual. They are both completely improvised, the former an audience participation tribute to the dwindling population of bees, and the latter using rocks as a musical source in a random and complex sound pattern that will engulf the audience. Eleanor Aversa's piece "Probably Helical" pays homage to Rosalind Franklin, a brilliant female scientist from the 1940s and 50s whose contribution to science and the discovery of the double helix has mostly gone uncelebrated and unsung, until now…!
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