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Allegri's Miserere - March 28 & 29, April 5

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  • SFRenaissance Voices
    THE ALL ALLEGRI CONCERT San Francisco Renaissance Voices (Todd Jolly, Director) presents a concert of the music of one of the most popular composers of the
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 13, 2009
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      THE ALL ALLEGRI CONCERT

      San Francisco Renaissance Voices (Todd Jolly, Director) presents a
      concert of the music of one of the most popular composers of the late
      Renaissance, Gregorio Allegri (1582-1652).  For contemporary
      audiences, Allegri is primarily known for his legendary "Miserere" but
      during his life time he was a prolific composer writing numerous
      masses, motets and other works.   In addition to the Miserere, San
      Francisco Renaissance Voices will perform other music he composed for
      use by the Vatican during Holy Week including his "Missa che fa oggi
      il mio sole," a parody mass based on the madrigal of the same name by
      Luca Marenzio, his "Lamentations of Jeremiah" and several motets.

      WHO:  San Francisco Renaissance Voices (Todd Jolly, Director)
      WHAT:  The All Allegri Concert - the music of Gregorio Allegri
      (1582-1652) including the legendary Miserere with Missa che fa oggi il
      mio sole, Lamentations of Jeremiah and motets
      WHEN/WHERE:  (Note:  THREE concerts)
      March 28, 7:30 pm - Seventh Avenue Performances, 1329 Seventh Avenue,
      San Francisco
      March 29, 7:30 pm - All Saints' Episcopal, 555 Waverley Street, Palo Alto
      April 5 - 4:00 pm - St. John's Presbyterian, 2727 College Avenue, Berkeley
      WEBSITE:  www.SFRV.org
      TICKETS:  $20 general admission, $15 student/senior - at the door or
      online at:  www.SFRV.org

      Allegri's Miserere, a setting of Vulgate Psalm 50 [51], is often
      celebrated as prime example of late Renaissance music even though
      technically it was written during the confines of the Baroque.  The
      work acquired a considerable reputation for mystery and
      inaccessibility between the time of its composition and the era of
      modern recording; the Vatican, wanting to preserve its aura of
      mystery, forbade copies, threatening any publication or attempted
      copying with excommunication. They were not prepared however, as
      legend has it, for a special visit in 1770 from a 14-year-old Mozart,
      who, on a visit to Rome with his father, heard it but twice and
      transcribed it faithfully from memory, thus creating the first
      "bootleg" copy.  Still performed at the Vatican during Holy Week, the
      work itself is rather basic (church music at the time placed a large
      gap between written and performance practice) but has become famous
      for the ornamentations in the solo parts (embellishments were largely
      placed in the hands of the performers' tastes, a practice that
      continues today).

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