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  • Lucas Molina
    i m new to the list and am wondering if anyone has ever read DUNE by Frank Herbert. it may seem odd, but, in the book, he uses the word axolotl to refer to a
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 1, 1999
      i'm new to the list and am wondering if anyone has ever read DUNE by
      Frank Herbert. it may seem odd, but, in the book, he uses the word
      axolotl to refer to a tank used for cloning. i can gather from some of
      the postings that xolotl means doll, but i don't know what the a- adds
      to the word. i haven't studied much of the language yet so i haven't
      committed much grammar to memory. thank you to anyone who responds.
    • John F. Schwaller
      ... axolotl is a water puppy, a non-metamorphosed salamander. It comes from Nahuatl and means a water xolotl. There was a relatively large group of animals
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 1, 1999
        At 09:17 AM 12/1/1999 -0500, you wrote:
        >i'm new to the list and am wondering if anyone has ever read DUNE by
        >Frank Herbert. it may seem odd, but, in the book, he uses the word
        >axolotl to refer to a tank used for cloning. i can gather from some of
        >the postings that xolotl means doll, but i don't know what the a- adds
        >to the word. i haven't studied much of the language yet so i haven't
        >committed much grammar to memory. thank you to anyone who responds.

        axolotl is a water puppy, a non-metamorphosed salamander. It
        comes from Nahuatl and means a water xolotl. There was a
        relatively large group of animals in Nahuatl taxonomy which b
        elonged to the xolotl class including the turkey (big xolotl) and
        the owl (rock xolotl)


        John Frederick Schwaller schwallr@...
        Associate Provost 406-243-4722
        The University of Montana FAX 406-243-5937
        http://www.umt.edu/history/NAHUATL/
      • Carlos M Rincon
        Hi Lucas: An axolotl (Amphystoma tigrina) is an amphibian regarded by Mexicans as one of their most unique animals. It s metamorphosis is arrested so that it
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 1, 1999
          Hi Lucas:

          An axolotl (Amphystoma tigrina) is an amphibian regarded by
          Mexicans as one of their most unique animals. It's metamorphosis
          is arrested so that it never leaves its watery environment....
          keeps its tail, branchia etc. The allusion to tank... not a
          wheeled weapon, but rather a holding area or receptacle could
          be a tenuous reference to the axolotl's need for continuous
          immersion. It is an edible salamander. It is believed to be a
          fish that menstruates like women (Karttunen, F. 1983:15, An
          Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl, Univ. of Texas Press, Austin).

          The ethymological derivation is especially tricky: the "a" is a
          prefix derived from the Nahuatl word "atl" meaning water. "Xolotl"
          could be derived from the verb "xolahua" or "xoloa" meaning to
          slip, or to have a slippery quality (Karttunen 1983:330).
          Interestingly, "xolotl" is frequently used to refer to twinned
          objects, hence the closest connotation to cloning that I could
          find. Refer to Miller, M. and K. Taube 1993:190, in The Gods and
          Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya, Thames and Hudson Ltd.,
          London.

          Hope this helps. Good luck.

          Carlos

          Carlos A. Rincon Mautner
          carmecol@...
        • a8803917
          The axolotl is a kind of newt living in central mexico (from atl =water and xolotl =nude, skinless) Lucas Molina schrieb:
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 1, 1999
            The axolotl is a kind of newt living in central mexico (from
            "atl"=water and "xolotl"=nude, skinless)

            Lucas Molina schrieb:
          • Michael Mccafferty
            a(tl): water. Michael McCafferty C.E.L.T. 307 Memorial Hall Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana 47405 mmccaffe@indiana.edu
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 1, 1999
              a(tl): water.


              Michael McCafferty
              C.E.L.T.
              307 Memorial Hall
              Indiana University
              Bloomington, Indiana
              47405
              mmccaffe@...
            • Tom Frederiksen
              An interesting side note on the axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) are gills which look like feathers. An obvious reference to the the duality of Quetzalcoatl
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 1, 1999
                An interesting side note on the axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum)
                are gills which look like feathers. An obvious reference to the
                the duality of Quetzalcoatl /Xolotl (the dog headed monster)
                could be made. The white mutant variety is very interesting.

                Anyone interested in seeing a picture of these cute little
                critters can visit http://www.indiana.edu/~axolotl/
                This is the web site for the Indiana University Axolotl Colony,
                which is the largest in the world.

                Best,
                Tom Frederiksen
              • John Carr
                ... Yes, in fact many or all of the DUNE series. ... Noticed that myself. ... Monster ... The axolotl is a reptile, a lizard, that was thought to be able to
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 2, 1999
                  > i'm new to the list and am wondering if anyone has ever read DUNE by
                  > Frank Herbert.

                  Yes, in fact many or all of the DUNE series.

                  > it may seem odd, but, in the book, he uses the word
                  > axolotl to refer to a tank used for cloning.

                  Noticed that myself.

                  > i can gather from some of
                  > the postings that xolotl means doll,

                  Monster

                  > but i don't know what the a- adds
                  > to the word. i haven't studied much of the language yet so i haven't
                  > committed much grammar to memory. thank you to anyone who responds.

                  The axolotl is a reptile, a lizard, that was thought to be able
                  to regrow a severed limb.

                  jc
                • Jorge Perez de Lara
                  ... I am not a zoologist, but I have seen many examples of axolotl (they are still common in Mexican markets, sold as pets) and they don t look like reptiles
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 2, 1999
                    John Carr wrote (in part):
                    >
                    >The axolotl is a reptile, a lizard, that was thought to be able
                    >to regrow a severed limb.

                    I am not a zoologist, but I have seen many examples of 'axolotl'
                    (they are still common in Mexican markets, sold as pets) and they
                    don't look like reptiles to my untrained eye. The fact is that
                    they may be almost unique in that they retain throughout their
                    lives the capability of breathing both through the use of lungs
                    AND branchia (gills). They look somewhat like salamanders,
                    although the long gills that protrude from their neck give
                    them a distinct appearance. My guess is that they would be
                    catalogued as amphibians, but I would not be surprised to find
                    that they have their own genre, given the fact that other
                    amphibians (notably toads and frogs) can breathe through the use
                    of both gills and lungs, but never simultaneously (they breathe
                    through gills when they are still in the tadpole stage and as
                    they mature and their lungs develop, they lose their gills and
                    cannot breathe in the water anymore) as in the case of the
                    axolotl. The only thing that keeps axolotls from being able to
                    stay away from water for extended periods is the fact that their
                    skin needs to be kept moist constantly. Other than that, they are
                    perfectly at ease breathing either oxygen dissolved in air (with
                    their lungs) or in water (with their gills).

                    Jorge Perez de Lara
                    Mexico

                    jorgepl@...
                  • Michael Mccafferty
                    For those interested, Julio Cortazar has an interesting short story titled Axolotl. It contains good descriptions of the animal. Michael McCafferty C.E.L.T.
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 2, 1999
                      For those interested, Julio Cortazar has an interesting short
                      story titled "Axolotl." It contains good descriptions of the
                      animal.

                      Michael McCafferty
                      C.E.L.T.
                      307 Memorial Hall
                      Indiana University
                      Bloomington, Indiana
                      47405
                      mmccaffe@...
                    • Jeffrey L Baker
                      ... Jorge is correct on this. Axolotl are actually amphibians not lizards. (I will admit to having missed that point in most of the previous posts on this
                      Message 10 of 10 , Dec 2, 1999
                        On Thu, 2 Dec 1999, Jorge Perez de Lara wrote:

                        >
                        > John Carr wrote (in part):
                        > >
                        > >The axolotl is a reptile, a lizard, that was thought to be able
                        > >to regrow a severed limb.
                        >
                        > I am not a zoologist, but I have seen many examples of 'axolotl'
                        > (they are still common in Mexican markets, sold as pets) and they
                        > don't look like reptiles to my untrained eye. The fact is that
                        > they may be almost unique in that they retain throughout their
                        > lives the capability of breathing both through the use of lungs
                        > AND branchia (gills). They look somewhat like salamanders,

                        Jorge is correct on this. Axolotl are actually amphibians not lizards.

                        (I will admit to having missed that point in most of the previous posts on
                        this subject).

                        Jeff Baker
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