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Re: Me: Olmec trade

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  • Javier Pulido Biosca
    Jorge: ... I do not discuss this, I am only insisting to be aware about our own interpretation system when we explain these cultures which are very different
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 31, 1997
      Jorge:

      At 01:17 PM 31/08/97 -0700, you wrote:

      > However, the very sacred nature of jade made it a most valuable trade
      >commodity in Mesoamerica, probably from pre-Olmec times. The fact that its
      >sacredness (and that of objects carved from it) accounts for its great
      >appreciation among Mesoamericans in no way detract from its value as a
      >trade object, but is rather the reason for it.

      I do not discuss this, I am only insisting to be aware about our own
      interpretation system when we explain these cultures which are very
      different from our pragmatistic and profane culture.

      >
      > Trading ritual objects seems to have been proven by the archaeological
      >data. However, I do not coincide with you in thinking that trade in
      >Mesoamerica revolved primarily around these artifacts (if you will pardon a
      >contemporary expression). While the exchange of this kind of objects
      >certainly explains the presence of jade (and other valuable stones) "far
      >from the Olmec nuclear zone" (and, once again, I would like to second
      >another listero's warning about the use of the word "Olmec", which should
      >not be construed as applying to a specific ethnic group), this in no way
      >determines that trade at the time of the Olmec horizon involved only the
      >exchange of ritual objects. Unfortunately, other trade items, such as
      >cotton cloth, foodstuffs, feathers, exotic animals and their pelts, etc.
      >very rarely survive in archaeological contexts. However, there is ample
      >indirect evidence (scenes on Maya pots being one of the most abundant) that
      >trade and/or tribute in these, more mundane commodities took place long
      >before the well-documented Mexica markets. Thus, it seems reasonable to
      >presume that such a long-lived system could have well been in force between
      >1500 and 500 B.C.

      For a big quantity od archaeologist, as Ann Cyphers in San Lorenzo is clear
      that they practice a kind of comerce. They found the dna of a kind of pine,
      and she conclude thay they carry the pine wood from a distant region. But
      Alfredo Delgado points out that about 1500 b.C. the glaciar period left a
      limit of coniphers woods more to the south than it is now a day, then the
      pines was not from a far region but from a very near place up by the
      Coatzacoalcos river.

      About the olmec trade culture we don't have evidences now. This is
      different with the maya or the Aztec empires. They have an intense comerce
      based part on the tribute system and part in market criterias.

      Sincerely,





      Javier Pulido Biosca
      RAICES Project
      Coatzacoalcos, Ver. Mx.
      fjpulido@...
      raices@...
      http://www.moomsa.com.mx/raices/
      http://www.geocities.com/~raices/index.html
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