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dueling hoaxes

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  • thekoba@aztecfreenet.org
    The following article was published on page A3 of the 1 March 2003 edition of The Arizona Republic and is credited to Michelle Morgante of the Associated
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 1, 2003
      The following article was published on page A3 of the 1 March 2003 edition of
      The Arizona Republic and is credited to Michelle Morgante of the Associated
      Press. I have not often expressed my views on the animal rights movement,
      but I have long looked on it with disdain. For sheer profit motives, animals
      in factory farms and most other farms are healthier, better-fed, and better
      treated than they would be in the wild, and when their time comes to become
      our meals are killed more humanely than they would be by predators. In
      defense of the carnivores on the Atkins diet here in protein-obsessed America,
      unlike the PETA people they don't harm defenseless plants. As for the tie-in
      between the PETA myths and the Holocaust myth, I am reminded of a sick Jewish
      fantasy film called <Soylent Green>, in which they speculate on what the
      goyim would do to them when they found out how useless and parasitic they
      were. Never fear, oh Chosen Ones, we're sure you'd leave a bad taste in our
      mouths :-)

      --Kevin

      CAMPAIGN TYING HOLOCAUST TO ANIMAL RIGHTS DRAWS FIRE

      San Diego--An animal rights campaign comparing the suffering of livestock to
      that of Holocaust victims is drawing sharp criticism from a Jewish group for
      "trivializing" the mass murder of Jews.

      "The Holocaust on Your Plate" campaign by People for the Ethical Treatment of
      Animals debuted in California and will make a national tour.

      The display is a set of eight six by ten foot panels showing photographs of
      Holocaust victims--emaciated men, crowds of people being forced onto trains,
      children behind barbed wire, heaps of human bodies--set next to similar
      images of cattle, pigs and chickens.

      The Anti-Defamation League denounced the project as "outrageous, offensive
      and taking chutzpah to new heights."

      PETA member Matt Prescott, creator of the campaign, said he is Jewish and
      his family lost several members in Nazi concentration camps. He said the
      campaign was funded by a Jewish philanthropist.

      "The fact is all animals feel pain, fear and loneliness," he said Friday.
      "We're asking people to recognize that what Jews and others went through
      in the Holocaust is what animals go through every day in factory farms."
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