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Re: [azsecularhumanists] income tax - its our own damn fault. a little history on it

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  • thekoba@aztecfreenet.org
    Honest Abe Lincoln wasn t above bending the constitution when it suited him, and he imposed an income tax to help pay for the Interstate War. After the war
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 15, 2004
      "Honest Abe" Lincoln wasn't above bending the constitution when it suited
      him, and he imposed an income tax to help pay for the Interstate War.
      After the war the United States Supreme Court ruled that the federal
      government had no authority to tax incomes. Thus it took the 16th
      Amendment to authorize the federal government to impose one. Initially
      it was a tax only on the wealthy and was not a burden to working folk.
      It was FDR who used the Second World War as an excuse to make the income
      tax a burden on all but the poorest of Americans. The Cold War was the
      excuse to maintain that burden. Now we have gotten used to paying it.
      I suggest that we impose the following reform on the tax code:

      --no taxation on individual incomes of less than $30,000 per year
      --graduated taxation above that level
      --all income over $100,000 per year to be confiscated

      That way the burden goes back to the rich, where it belongs.

      --Kevin Walsh

      >http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/viewpoints/articles/0215sackt
      >on0215.html
      >
      >
      >Confused by our tax code?
      >
      >We the people have only ourselves to blame for mess
      >
      >Feb. 15, 2004 12:00 AM
      >
      >In an annual, less than pleasant ritual, the taxpayers will prepare
      >their 2003 federal income tax returns. The 113,000 employees of the
      >U.S. Internal Revenue Service will process about 200 million tax
      >returns that will have been filed by April 15.
      >
      >On Jan. 5, the IRS sent postcards to the 28 million electronic tax
      >filers and 34 million Form 1040 booklets to the paper filers. The IRS
      >expects to process 131 million individual tax returns.
      >
      >Have you ever wondered how we ever came to adopt such an unwieldy,
      >time-consuming, and frequently frustrating tax system as the federal
      >income tax?
      >
      >Well, folks, we did it to ourselves.
      >
      >The people of the United States decided it was a good thing, so we
      >amended the Constitution to have an income tax.
      >
      >It all occurred 91 years ago, when the 16th Amendment was ad- opted.
      >The people didn't know what they were getting into because at that
      >time, the personal tax exemptions were generous, and less than one-
      >half of 1 percent of the people paid the tax. And they paid very
      >little.
      >
      >The tax was 1 percent of income. A graduated surtax beginning on
      >incomes of $20,000 (a lot of money in those days) rose gradually to 6
      >percent on incomes of more than $500,000 ($7 million in today's money
      >value).
      >
      >Once the income tax law was enacted, the fat was in the fire, because
      >the 16th Amendment is completely open ended with no restrictions or
      >limitations on Congress.
      >
      >The first few words of the amendment read, "The Congress shall have
      >the power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source
      >derived." With this blanket authority, Congress has changed the tax
      >rate many times since 1913, simply by legislative action.
      >
      >Apparently, the new tax code was not very well understood. Sen. Elihu
      >Root was speaking to a friend shortly after the tax was enacted and
      >is reported to have remarked that they both could go to jail for
      >failing to understand the tax form.
      >
      >Mind you, the original 1913 code had only 16 pages. Today's Revenue
      >Code is more than 36,000 pages. As we all have learned, it is still
      >not well understood, except by a well-trained cadre of tax
      >professionals.
      >
      >To put it in perspective, the Gettysburg Address runs about 200
      >words. The Declaration of Independence is about 1,300 words. The Holy
      >Bible contains about 773,000 words. But the federal income tax code
      >runs about 7 million words, and is growing longer every year. Since
      >1986, Congress has made more than 4,000 changes to the tax law.
      >
      >Although the Internal Revenue Service has taken a lot of heat
      >recently about its administration of the tax code, trying to correct
      >the administration is not the answer. The problem is with the basic
      >policies established by Congress that result in the tax code. Reform
      >must come from Congress, not the IRS.
      >
      >A few years ago, Forbes magazine asked the top 12 members of Congress
      >who write the tax laws - six from each party - if they prepared their
      >own tax returns. Only one did; the other 11 rely on tax professionals.
      >
      >The sole exception was Rep. Bill Archer of Texas, the senior
      >Republican on the Ways and Means Committee. At that time, he
      >said, , "I am convinced that if most members of Congress did their
      >own taxes, we would have had tax reform long ago." Archer wanted to
      >replace the tax code with a national sales tax.
      >
      >The significance of the 16th Amendment goes beyond the tax
      >implications. Before its enactment, the state was the dominant
      >authority of our system of government. The federal government played
      >an inferior role.
      >
      >Before 1913, the federal government had only a narrow range of policy
      >options in its legislative efforts, simply because it did not control
      >much revenue. Customs collections and alcohol taxes constituted 75
      >percent of all federal revenue.
      >
      >The change came with the new national income tax. In effect, Congress
      >captured the tax authority in the country. Belatedly, state and local
      >governments entered the income tax arena for a source of revenue. But
      >it was too late to make any significant impact in the total revenue
      >picture.
      >
      >Today, the federal government collects more than 90 percent of all
      >income taxes imposed on the people by all levels of government, and
      >it has become the dominant influence in our system of federal-state-
      >local government. The year 1913 and the federal income tax signaled
      >the trend to big government and pork-barrel politics.
      >
      >So, as we struggle with our tax forms to beat the midnight deadline
      >at the post office on April 15, let us remember that it was We the
      >People who made the decision to have a federal income tax and gave to
      >Congress unlimited authority to change the conditions and the amount
      >of the tax.
      >
      >
      >
      >When the government fears the people,
      >that is LIBERTY. When people fear the
      >government, that is TYRANNY.
      >
      >Thomas Jefferson
      >Premium Accounts for Legal Professionals
      >http://1stcounsel.com/
      >
      >
      >Community email addresses:
      > Post message: azsecularhumanists@onelist.com
      > Subscribe: azsecularhumanists-subscribe@onelist.com
      > Unsubscribe: azsecularhumanists-unsubscribe@onelist.com
      > List owner: azsecularhumanists-owner@onelist.com
      >
      >Shortcut URL to this page:
      > http://www.onelist.com/community/azsecularhumanists
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

      --
      "Terror is nought but prompt, severe, inflexible justice; it is therefore an
      emanation of virtue; it is less a particular principle than a consequence of
      the general principle of democracy applied to the most pressing needs of the
      fatherland." --Maximilien de Robespierre, 1794
    • mike ross
      ... well at least we agree on a few things about taxes :) mike ... From: thekoba@aztecfreenet.org Sent: Sun, 15 Feb 2004 12:46:55 -0700 (MST) To:
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 17, 2004
        > --no taxation on individual incomes of less than $30,000 per year

        well at least we agree on a few things about taxes :)

        mike

        ---- Begin Original Message ----

        From: thekoba@...
        Sent: Sun, 15 Feb 2004 12:46:55 -0700 (MST)
        To: azsecularhumanists@yahoogroups.com
        CC: cbpeek@..., nebukhadhnasar@...,
        Dpski795@...,llnicol@...
        Subject: Re: [azsecularhumanists] income tax - its our own damn
        fault. a little history on it




        "Honest Abe" Lincoln wasn't above bending the constitution when it
        suited
        him, and he imposed an income tax to help pay for the Interstate War.
        After the war the United States Supreme Court ruled that the federal
        government had no authority to tax incomes.  Thus it took the 16th
        Amendment to authorize the federal government to impose
        one.  Initially
        it was a tax only on the wealthy and was not a burden to working
        folk.
        It was FDR who used the Second World War as an excuse to make the
        income
        tax a burden on all but the poorest of Americans.  The Cold War was
        the
        excuse to maintain that burden.  Now we have gotten used to paying
        it.
        I suggest that we impose the following reform on the tax code:

          --no taxation on individual incomes of less than $30,000 per year
          --graduated taxation above that level
          --all income over $100,000 per year to be confiscated

        That way the burden goes back to the rich, where it belongs.

        --Kevin Walsh

        >http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/viewpoints/articles/0215sac
        kt
        >on0215.html
        >
        >
        >Confused by our tax code?
        >
        >We the people have only ourselves to blame for mess
        >
        >Feb. 15, 2004 12:00 AM
        >
        >In an annual, less than pleasant ritual, the taxpayers will prepare
        >their 2003 federal income tax returns. The 113,000 employees of the
        >U.S. Internal Revenue Service will process about 200 million tax
        >returns that will have been filed by April 15.
        >
        >On Jan. 5, the IRS sent postcards to the 28 million electronic tax
        >filers and 34 million Form 1040 booklets to the paper filers. The
        IRS
        >expects to process 131 million individual tax returns.
        >
        >Have you ever wondered how we ever came to adopt such an unwieldy,
        >time-consuming, and frequently frustrating tax system as the
        federal
        >income tax?
        >
        >Well, folks, we did it to ourselves.
        >
        >The people of the United States decided it was a good thing, so we
        >amended the Constitution to have an income tax.
        >
        >It all occurred 91 years ago, when the 16th Amendment was ad-
        opted.
        >The people didn't know what they were getting into because at that
        >time, the personal tax exemptions were generous, and less than one-
        >half of 1 percent of the people paid the tax. And they paid very
        >little.
        >
        >The tax was 1 percent of income. A graduated surtax beginning on
        >incomes of $20,000 (a lot of money in those days) rose gradually to
        6
        >percent on incomes of more than $500,000 ($7 million in today's
        money
        >value).
        >
        >Once the income tax law was enacted, the fat was in the fire,
        because
        >the 16th Amendment is completely open ended with no restrictions or
        >limitations on Congress.
        >
        >The first few words of the amendment read, "The Congress shall have
        >the power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source
        >derived." With this blanket authority, Congress has changed the tax
        >rate many times since 1913, simply by legislative action.
        >
        >Apparently, the new tax code was not very well understood. Sen.
        Elihu
        >Root was speaking to a friend shortly after the tax was enacted and
        >is reported to have remarked that they both could go to jail for
        >failing to understand the tax form.
        >
        >Mind you, the original 1913 code had only 16 pages. Today's Revenue
        >Code is more than 36,000 pages. As we all have learned, it is still
        >not well understood, except by a well-trained cadre of tax
        >professionals.
        >
        >To put it in perspective, the Gettysburg Address runs about 200
        >words. The Declaration of Independence is about 1,300 words. The
        Holy
        >Bible contains about 773,000 words. But the federal income tax code
        >runs about 7 million words, and is growing longer every year. Since
        >1986, Congress has made more than 4,000 changes to the tax law.
        >
        >Although the Internal Revenue Service has taken a lot of heat
        >recently about its administration of the tax code, trying to
        correct
        >the administration is not the answer. The problem is with the basic
        >policies established by Congress that result in the tax code.
        Reform
        >must come from Congress, not the IRS.
        >
        >A few years ago, Forbes magazine asked the top 12 members of
        Congress
        >who write the tax laws - six from each party - if they prepared
        their
        >own tax returns. Only one did; the other 11 rely on tax
        professionals.
        >
        >The sole exception was Rep. Bill Archer of Texas, the senior
        >Republican on the Ways and Means Committee. At that time, he
        >said, , "I am convinced that if most members of Congress did their
        >own taxes, we would have had tax reform long ago." Archer wanted to
        >replace the tax code with a national sales tax.
        >
        >The significance of the 16th Amendment goes beyond the tax
        >implications. Before its enactment, the state was the dominant
        >authority of our system of government. The federal government
        played
        >an inferior role.
        >
        >Before 1913, the federal government had only a narrow range of
        policy
        >options in its legislative efforts, simply because it did not
        control
        >much revenue. Customs collections and alcohol taxes constituted 75
        >percent of all federal revenue.
        >
        >The change came with the new national income tax. In effect,
        Congress
        >captured the tax authority in the country. Belatedly, state and
        local
        >governments entered the income tax arena for a source of revenue.
        But
        >it was too late to make any significant impact in the total revenue
        >picture.
        >
        >Today, the federal government collects more than 90 percent of all
        >income taxes imposed on the people by all levels of government, and
        >it has become the dominant influence in our system of federal-state-
        >local government. The year 1913 and the federal income tax signaled
        >the trend to big government and pork-barrel politics.
        >
        >So, as we struggle with our tax forms to beat the midnight deadline
        >at the post office on April 15, let us remember that it was We the
        >People who made the decision to have a federal income tax and gave
        to
        >Congress unlimited authority to change the conditions and the
        amount
        >of the tax.
        >
        >
        >
        >When the government fears the people,
        >that is LIBERTY.  When people fear the
        >government, that is TYRANNY.
        >
        >Thomas Jefferson
        >Premium Accounts for Legal Professionals
        >http://1stcounsel.com/
        >
        >
        >Community email addresses:
        >  Post message: azsecularhumanists@onelist.com
        >  Subscribe:    azsecularhumanists-subscribe@onelist.com
        >  Unsubscribe:  azsecularhumanists-unsubscribe@onelist.com
        >  List owner:   azsecularhumanists-owner@onelist.com
        >
        >Shortcut URL to this page:
        >  http://www.onelist.com/community/azsecularhumanists
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >

        --
        "Terror is nought but prompt, severe, inflexible justice; it is
        therefore an
        emanation of virtue; it is less a particular principle than a
        consequence of
        the general principle of democracy applied to the most pressing
        needs of the
        fatherland." --Maximilien de Robespierre, 1794


        Community email addresses:
         Post message: azsecularhumanists@onelist.com
         Subscribe:    azsecularhumanists-subscribe@onelist.com
         Unsubscribe:  azsecularhumanists-unsubscribe@onelist.com
         List owner:   azsecularhumanists-owner@onelist.com

        Shortcut URL to this page:
         http://www.onelist.com/community/azsecularhumanists
        Yahoo! Groups Links







        ---- End Original Message ----




        When the government fears the people,
        that is LIBERTY. When people fear the
        government, that is TYRANNY.

        Thomas Jefferson
        Premium Accounts for Legal Professionals
        http://1stcounsel.com/
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