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CDC study on gun law-violence link inconclusive

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  • thekoba@aztecfreenet.org
    The following article, attributed to Kirsten Wyatt of the Associated Press, appeared on page A8 of the Friday, October 3, 2003 edition of the Arizona Republic.
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 3, 2003
      The following article, attributed to Kirsten Wyatt of the Associated Press,
      appeared on page A8 of the Friday, October 3, 2003 edition of the Arizona
      Republic. There is something sinister about the use of a public health
      agency to push the gun-grabber agenda, but they can't seem to cook the
      books enough to do so. No study is needed to show that such link does
      not hold water. Japan and Britain have rates of murder and violent crime
      as high as those of the USA, and in those countries virtually no one can
      lawfully own firearms.

      --Kevin Walsh

      CDC: NO PROOF GUN LAWS CURB VIOLENCE

      Agency Cautions Study Isn't Definitive

      Atlanta--A fedeal review of the nation's gun-control laws, including
      mandatory waiting periods and bans on certain weapons, found no proof
      such measures reduce firearm violence.

      The review, released Thursday, was conducted by a task force of scientists
      appointed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

      The CDC said the report suggests more study is needed, not that gun laws
      don't work. But the agency siad it has no plans to spend more money on
      firearms study.

      Some conservatives have said the CDC should limit itself to studying
      diseases, and some have complained in the past that the agency has used
      firearms-tracking data to subtly push gun control. In fact, since a
      1996 fight in Congress, the CDC has been prohibited from using funds to
      press for gun-control laws.

      Since then, the task force reviewed 51 published studies about the
      effectiveness of eight types of gun-control laws.

      The laws included bans on specific firearms or ammunition, measures
      barring felons from buying guns, and mandatory waiting periods and
      firearm registration. None of the studies was done by the federal
      government.

      In every case, a CDC task force found "insufficient evidence to determine
      effectiveness."

      "I would not want to speculate on how different groups may interpret this
      report," said Dr. Sue Blinder, director of CDC's Center for Injury
      Prevention and Control. "It's simply a review of the literature."

      Most of the studies were not funded by the CDC. Gun-control advocates
      quickly called on the government to fund better research.
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