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Putin considers sending Russian troops to Iraq

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  • thekoba@aztecfreenet.org
    The following article, attributed to Deborah Seward of the Associated Press, appeared on page A22 of the Sunday, September 21, 2003 edition of the Arizona
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 21, 2003
      The following article, attributed to Deborah Seward of the Associated Press,
      appeared on page A22 of the Sunday, September 21, 2003 edition of the Arizona
      Republic. Iraq does not belong to the United Nations. Iraq has one
      legitimate government: that of the Ba'ath Party and President Hussein,
      voted in with near unanimity almost one year ago. An invasion under the
      auspices of the United Nations is still an invasion, and the people of Iraq
      will resist it with the same vigour as they are now resisting the Anglo-
      American invasion. The United Nations is a poor fig-leaf for naked
      imperialist aggression, and Russia should have no part in such aggression,
      as Russia has no legitimate interests in aiding imperialism and every
      interest in standing in solidarity with the people of Iraq and all others
      who resist imperialism. I urge the Russian people and the Russian Army to
      resist Putin's attempt to make Russians and Iraqis fight each other for
      the benefit of the Zionists and imperialists!

      --Kevin Walsh

      PUTIN DOES NOT RULE OUT SENDING TROOPS INTO IRAQ

      Novo-Ogaryovo, Russia--President Vladimir Putin said Saturday that Russia is
      ready to put aside differences over the war in Iraq to work with the United
      States on rebuilding the country, even holding out the possibility of
      eventually sending troops. But he told reporters that the United Nations
      must have a real, not a decorative role.

      The Russian leader, who will attend the U.N. General Assembly session in New
      York that starts Tuesday, appeared optimistic about his talks with Bush at
      Camp David last week.

      Putin opposed the war in Iraq and joined French and German efforts to
      prevent passage of a U.N. resolution Bush sought authorizing the use of force.
      He said Russia's position hadn't changed, and that "the situation that is
      developing in Iraq is the best confirmation that Russia was right."

      Putin set the stage for cooperation with the United States as well as
      bargaining with Bush, who wants a new U.N. resolution for a multinational
      force.

      "In contrast to many participants of this process, our approach is quite
      liberal," Putin said. "Theoretically, we don't exclude more active
      participation of Russia in the restoration of Iraq, including the
      participation of our military in the normalization process."
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