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Re: [azsecularhumanists] Cola giants challenged in Turkey

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  • thekoba@aztecfreenet.org
    ... There is no comparison. There is no shortage of cola in Turkey or elsewhere, and cola is not necessary for getting to work or otherwise sustaining life.
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 21, 2003
      >
      >now this supports ernies concept
      >of letting people charge $4 for
      >a gallong of gas or coke.
      >
      >sell a product for too much and
      >the free market will get people
      >who make it and sell it for less
      >so they can make a buck.
      >
      >as soon as the compitition kicks
      >in the $4 gallon price of gas
      >will be dropping

      There is no comparison. There is no shortage of cola in Turkey or
      elsewhere, and cola is not necessary for getting to work or otherwise
      sustaining life. If someone were price-gouging cola, people could
      simply switch to tea or water. At the moment there is a shortage of
      petrol in Phoenix, and the competition is minimal. That is why
      rationing is needed, not price-gouging.

      --Kevin
    • thekoba@aztecfreenet.org
      Dear Eric, Many thanks for this vivid description of Arab soft drinks of the 1970s. They do sound good. Comradely, Kevin
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 21, 2003
        Dear Eric,

        Many thanks for this vivid description of Arab soft
        drinks of the 1970s. They do sound good.

        Comradely,

        Kevin

        >
        >Dear Kevin,
        >
        >When I was in Saudi Arabia and Syria in the mid-1970s
        >(when things were less degraded than now) the
        >situation was that CocaCola had been kicked out of all
        >Arab countries for opening a facility in occupied
        >Palestine. That violated the embargo so all the Arab
        >countries where Coke was, kicked them out. (Those
        >were the days!)
        >
        >In Saudi Arabia the CocaCola bottlers left their plant
        >behind and an enterprising Saudi named S. M. Kaaki
        >bought the place and started producing "Kaaki Cola"
        >which was available as far as I knew throughout the
        >Kingdom - anyway wherever I went it was there, so it
        >was not a niche market. To me it tasted just like
        >Coke, but then I can't tell the difference between
        >Coke and Pepsi either.
        >
        >At that time, however, Pepsi had not opened any
        >facilities in occupied Palestine so their drink was
        >readily available. Of course other Pepsi drinks were
        >also available in Saudia too as well as some western
        >orange and other soda drinks that might or might not
        >be Pepsi products; I don't know.
        >
        >I don't know if Coke ever was allowed into Syria, but
        >when I was there they had lots of ultra sweet fruit
        >flavoured soft drinks -- bright red ("cherry" I
        >suppose) and bright yellow ("orange", I guess). It
        >was like drinking liquid sugar cane, but it was made
        >in Syria. That too served the whole country, not a
        >niche market. Since it was not brown, I guess it
        >wasn't an "import substitution" for Coke, but it was a
        >fizzy soft drink. In Syrian colloquial, soft drinks
        >are called "gazzoz" because of the carbonation (gas) I
        >suppose.
        >
        >I don't know what's gone on since I left. I suspect
        >they've been flooded by all sorts of western crap.
        >
        >What was nice, however, was that in summer months
        >there were lots of little juice shops everywhere both
        >in Saudia and in Syria. They had fresh fruits -
        >mangoes, bananas, etc., -- and for half a riyal in
        >Saudia (about 15 cents) you could get a tall glass
        >full of fresh fruit juice with a little crushed ice in
        >it. In Syria the price was one Lira (33 cents, then)
        >but they gave you the whole blender-full.
        >
        >Those prices were comparable to the bottled soft
        >drinks. They were not so portable, that is, you had
        >to buy them in the juice shops, not at a restaurant or
        >coffee house, and since they only only had glasses,
        >not paper cups, you had to consume it there. Still it
        >was a lot better than soft drinks.
        >
        >Then as far as drinks go, in Syria and Turkey too the
        >old and traditional summer drink is called Sous in
        >Arabic. I don't know what the Turkish word is. Sous
        >is licorice, but oddly for a region where they seem
        >addicted to sugar, this is unsweetened and quite
        >bitter. It's like drinking rootbeer with NO
        >sweetening, if you can imagine, and tastes like
        >sucking on a root. But after you overcome the initial
        >reaction, it is refreshing because it's cold. (And
        >sweet things aren't in fact thirst quenching.) I
        >actually miss it when I think about it.
        >
        >The sous seller wanders around with a large decorated
        >brass contraption on his back (containing the drink)
        >and he serves the sous in little brass bowels that
        >everyone drinks out of. I suppose that's not
        >"hygienic" but I was used to such things. As he walks
        >around he clangs the little brass bowels together to
        >let people know of his coming. I can't remember the
        >cost for a drink but it would only be a few cents.
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