Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Rodong Sinmun editorial

Expand Messages
  • thekoba@aztecfreenet.org
    ... Dear Eric, Publishing a complete collection of his works would be a worthy endeavour for an historian. Perhaps you will be able to do this after you
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 11, 2003
      >
      >Dear Kevin,
      >
      >As you know I recently acquired the Works of Comrade
      >Stalin such as they were published until being
      >discontinued by Khrushchyov in 1955.
      >
      >That, in turn, has prompted me to try to collect other
      >Stalin works from 1934-1953 that were not included in
      >the 13 volumes of the Works. I've started with the
      >pamphlets that I could find on various library
      >catalogue lists and have ordered some via interlibrary
      >loan. Most are short articles and should not be
      >difficult or expensive to photocopy.
      >
      >One of those which I ordered was an interview that
      >H.G. Wells, the famous British writer, did with Stalin
      >in 1936. It was entitled "Marxism vs. liberalism".
      >That should be very interesting.

      Dear Eric,

      Publishing a complete collection of his works would be
      a worthy endeavour for an historian. Perhaps you will
      be able to do this after you complete your dissertation.
      The main problem would be how to get funding for such
      a project.

      >You're right about Juche resembling humanism in some
      >sense. Actually, I disagree with the Korean comrades,
      >and think that the human role is simply an aspect of
      >the dialectic between man and his surroundings. That
      >is, I agree that man is creative, etc., and makes his
      >world, but he does so based on the objective world in
      >which he finds himself.
      >
      >Some 19th century Marxists did mistakenly think that
      >advanced technology always beats backward technology,
      >and probably they thought that that was a
      >"materialist" way of looking at the problem. I would
      >say, though, that such a way of looking at it was in
      >fact mechanical materialism, not dialectical.
      >
      >Still, some western writers have called Mao and Lenin
      >"voluntarists" for asserting the importance of the
      >Party, of consciousness and of a determined people
      >ready to rebel against an enemy more advanced in
      >technology and more powerful economically. Perhaps
      >the Juche theory in fact simply gives form to that
      >"voluntarism" of Lenin and Mao that in my opinion is
      >simply good dialectics.

      Interesting point. It has occured to me that this
      repackaging of old ideology under a new label may
      simply be a salve to the national pride of the Korean
      people, so that they can pat themselves on the back
      and say, "Look, we've added something new to Marxist
      ideology." They've certainly added something to its
      practice, but I'm not entirely sure that Juche can
      really be considered new.

      Comradely,

      Kevin
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.