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serial spitter stalks air force

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  • thekoba@aztecfreenet.org
    The following article appeared on page B5 of the Saturday 29 March 2003 edition of The Arizona Republic and is credited to Republic reporter David Madrid.
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 29, 2003
      The following article appeared on page B5 of the Saturday 29 March 2003
      edition of The Arizona Republic and is credited to Republic reporter David
      Madrid. Does she work for Iraq, al-Qaida, or a certain former Navy airman
      I know engaged in inter-service rivalry? The plot thickens.

      --Kevin

      I don't know but it's been said
      Air Force wings are made of lead
      I don't know but I've been told
      Navy wings are made of gold

      --Naval aviator jodi

      SPITTER MAY BE TARGETING LUKE PERSONNEL

      Luke Air Force Base--After three spitting incidents aimed at two airmen and
      the spouse of an airman, Luke Air Force Base is warning its people they may
      become targets.

      The incidents may be the work of a serial spitter because in all three
      instances the description is the same: a blond, overweight woman in her 40s
      [Ms. Barr ???!!! --K.W.] who accosted people in the parking lots of West
      Valley shopping centers.

      The first incident, on March 17 near 91st and Olive Avenues, involved an
      airman's wife. She was wearing a T-shirt with an Air Force emblem on it
      when the woman spit on the ground and said "That's what I think of your
      military."

      Four days later, near 83rd Avenue and McDowell Road, an airman in uniform
      was approached by a woman who asked if he was in the military.

      "When he said yes, he turned to look at her, and she spit in his face and
      walked away," said Senior Master Sergeant Gene LeDoucer, a base spokesman.

      The latest incident was Tuesday, at 91st Avenue and Bell Road, when a woman
      spit toward a female airman in uniform but missed.

      The base has told its airmen to be mentally prepared for these kinds of
      incidents and to walk away from them. If they can, base officials would
      like them to get a better description of the person and possibly a license
      plate number so that the police can look into it.

      "We want to make sure we can get across to the public that this isn't
      something we normally encounter." LaDoucer said. "We have a great outpouring
      of support. That is usually what we see in public. This has taken us a bit
      off guard."
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