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Re: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC

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  • George Klump
    The answer is yes: this is a possibility, especially with small children. Many plants have toxins in them. They re for looking at rather than eating. George
    Message 1 of 279 , Jan 6, 2008
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      The answer is yes: this is a possibility, especially with small children.  Many plants have toxins in them.  They're for looking at rather than eating.
       
      George Klump
      Southern California Chapter
       
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2008 3:07 AM
      Subject: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC

      this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC.

      I read a book recently and in it, it was mentioned that the azalea plant if
      ingested can be fatal. Is this true?

      Yours Sincerely
      Andrew Frangs
      Cell: 0837852428

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    • hevestenning
      Hi Donna, Thanks for asking the Azalea Group. The problem may be that they are well watered” as you say. The one thing that azaleas don t like is wet
      Message 279 of 279 , Feb 5 6:19 AM
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        Hi Donna,

        Thanks for asking the Azalea Group.

        The problem may be that they are "well watered” as you say.  The one thing that azaleas don't like is wet roots.  The containers need to have drainage in the bottom.  They also need to dry out a little between waterings.  They would much rather be stressed by being dry than being too wet, so always err on the dry side.  You may need to dig down into the soil with your finger to check on the moisture.


        Also, "well watered” is a pun in that the well water in Colorado may be alkaline.  It is always best to use cistern water (rain water) if you are not sure of the pH of your tap water.  This should sow up first as chlorosis, the yellowing of the leaves but with green veins.  Without chlorosis, this is probably not the problem.

        The problem may also be that the soil may be getting too dense.  A good soil has organic matter in it, but organic matter has a way of decomposing into inorganic matter.  When this happens it is best to repot with new soil.  I would always do this when the plant is at its most dormant period. Also, never let the roots dry out.  A dry root is a dead root.  If you repot, keep the roots misted during the change.

        Another possibility is that there may have been too much fertilizer.  Azaleas don’t need much fertilizing.  In the garden, they can get enough from the mulch layer that is constantly being applied and slowly decomposing.


        Steve Henning,

        Zone 6, Reading, PA  USA


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