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Deciduous Azaleas

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  • iltkyao
    Hello to all Azalea Lovers worldwide. Who are the new or old guns hybridizing deciduous azaleas??/ Maybe an article in the Azalean has been written before I
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 6, 2004
      Hello to all Azalea Lovers worldwide.

      Who are the "new or old guns" hybridizing deciduous azaleas??/

      Maybe an article in the Azalean has been written before I Joined the
      ASA IN 2001, IF so could you let me know. I do have Galle's revised
      and Enlarged edition but it's only 60 pages devoted to Deciduous ones
      vs Evergreen. I have started to make some crosses, Klondyke, Cecile,
      Windsor Buttercup,Red Sunset, and Jane Abbott are my first attempts,
      and the pods are getting swollen, so in a couple of months I will
      have some seeds, but I wonder if
      I am possibly repeating what's been done already. Please shed some
      light on the subject, is it worth persuing?? I do have these plants
      to work with Antelope, Gibraltar, Choptank Seedling from the 2002
      Atlanta ARS/ASA Conv, Fireball, Klondyke,Red Sunset,Cecile,Cheerful
      Giant,Jane ABbott,Austrium from the 2003 ASA Chattanoga Conv, Red
      Velvet,George Reynolds,Windsor Buttercup,Homebush, N.L.wHITE lIGHTS,
      yELLOW POM-POM, red POM-POM,HI-LITES, Frank abbott,Yellow Giant,TRI-
      LIGHTS,Moonlight Rose, Rosy LIGHTS, aRNESON rUBY, Yellow cloud, White
      Swan, Viscosum from East Fork nursery, Golden lights, Mandarin
      Lights, Snowbird,Parade,Salmon delight, Better letter., WHERE DOES
      one begin the task of becomimg crazy with this virus??

      Thanks so much for any input.

      Tadeusz- Board Memnber Lake Michigan Chapter of ASA,
      Membership renewal chair -Midwest Chapter ARS.

      IT'S in the 80's with much needed rain drops coming down in the
      Chicago area.
    • Bill Miller
      Tadeusz, When I think of US breeders of deciduous azaleas, the following names come to mind: Girard Aromi Arneson Dodd III Univ. of Minn. Carlson Beasley
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 6, 2004
        Tadeusz,

        When I think of US breeders of deciduous azaleas, the following names
        come to mind:

        Girard
        Aromi
        Arneson
        Dodd III
        Univ. of Minn.
        Carlson
        Beasley
        Sommerville

        Yes, I think developing deciduous azaleas is worth pursuing. Good Luck.

        Bill Miller
        Bethesda, Maryland

        iltkyao wrote:

        >
        >
        > Hello to all Azalea Lovers worldwide.
        >
        > Who are the "new or old guns" hybridizing deciduous azaleas??/
        >
        > Maybe an article in the Azalean has been written before I Joined the
        > ASA IN 2001, IF so could you let me know. I do have Galle's revised
        > and Enlarged edition but it's only 60 pages devoted to Deciduous ones
        > vs Evergreen. I have started to make some crosses, Klondyke, Cecile,
        > Windsor Buttercup,Red Sunset, and Jane Abbott are my first attempts,
        > and the pods are getting swollen, so in a couple of months I will
        > have some seeds, but I wonder if
        > I am possibly repeating what's been done already. Please shed some
        > light on the subject, is it worth persuing?? I do have these plants
        > to work with Antelope, Gibraltar, Choptank Seedling from the 2002
        > Atlanta ARS/ASA Conv, Fireball, Klondyke,Red Sunset,Cecile,Cheerful
        > Giant,Jane ABbott,Austrium from the 2003 ASA Chattanoga Conv, Red
        > Velvet,George Reynolds,Windsor Buttercup,Homebush, N.L.wHITE lIGHTS,
        > yELLOW POM-POM, red POM-POM,HI-LITES, Frank abbott,Yellow Giant,TRI-
        > LIGHTS,Moonlight Rose, Rosy LIGHTS, aRNESON rUBY, Yellow cloud, White
        > Swan, Viscosum from East Fork nursery, Golden lights, Mandarin
        > Lights, Snowbird,Parade,Salmon delight, Better letter., WHERE DOES
        > one begin the task of becomimg crazy with this virus??
        >
        > Thanks so much for any input.
        >
        > Tadeusz- Board Memnber Lake Michigan Chapter of ASA,
        > Membership renewal chair -Midwest Chapter ARS.
        >
        > IT'S in the 80's with much needed rain drops coming down in the
        > Chicago area.
        >
        >
      • Will and Kate Ferrell
        Tadeusz, Bill Miller answered your question about new lights in dec. azaleas hybridizing. The answer to your question WHERE DOES one begin the task of
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 6, 2004
          Tadeusz,
          Bill Miller answered your question about 'new lights' in dec. azaleas
          hybridizing.
          The answer to your question 'WHERE DOES
          one begin the task of becomimg crazy with this virus??' is "Isn't it
          grand?!" Join the club. They are beautiful & that's all the excuse we
          need.

          Will
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "iltkyao" <iltkyao@...>
          To: <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, July 06, 2004 8:51 PM
          Subject: [AZ] Deciduous Azaleas
        • sjperk5
          Bill Weston Nursery has developed some of the best late blooming deciduous azaleas there are for cold areas. These are much better plants than those produced
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 7, 2004
            Bill

            Weston Nursery has developed some of the best late blooming deciduous
            azaleas there are for cold areas. These are much better plants than
            those produced by U of Minn. Girard's has better doubles but Westons
            singles are hardy, fragrant, give good fall color, and maintain the
            native species look while increasing the color spectrum.

            Weston is clearly the leader when it comes to developing hardy
            lepidotes but their decidous azaleas are also good plants worth
            trying for any one looking for late, fragrant, or hardy.

            John Perkins
            Salem, NH
          • William Sweeney
            Bill & Tadeusz To that list should definitely be added Joe Parks of New Hampshire. His wonderful series of Cherokee hybrids includes many
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 7, 2004
              Bill & Tadeusz

              To that list should definitely be added Joe Parks <joeb@...> of
              New Hampshire. His wonderful series of 'Cherokee' hybrids includes many
              very hardy, brightly colorful, fragrant, mildew and caterpillar
              resistant plants! He has been trying for some time to get them
              distributed in the trade.

              Joe: Are any of your Cherokees available commercially right now?

              Bill Sweeney
              Concord, Mass


              On Jul 6, 2004, at 8:39 PM, Bill Miller wrote:

              > Tadeusz,
              >
              > When I think of US breeders of deciduous azaleas, the following names
              > come to mind:
              >
              > Girard
              > Aromi
              > Arneson
              > Dodd III
              > Univ. of Minn.
              > Carlson
              > Beasley
              > Sommerville
              >
              > Yes, I think developing deciduous azaleas is worth pursuing. Good
              > Luck.
              >
              > Bill Miller
              > Bethesda, Maryland
              >
              > iltkyao wrote:
              >
              >>
              >>
              >> Hello to all Azalea Lovers worldwide.
              >>
              >> Who are the "new or old guns" hybridizing deciduous azaleas??/
              >>
              >> Maybe an article in the Azalean has been written before I Joined the
              >> ASA IN 2001, IF so could you let me know. I do have Galle's revised
              >> and Enlarged edition but it's only 60 pages devoted to Deciduous ones
              >> vs Evergreen. I have started to make some crosses, Klondyke, Cecile,
              >> Windsor Buttercup,Red Sunset, and Jane Abbott are my first attempts,
              >> and the pods are getting swollen, so in a couple of months I will
              >> have some seeds, but I wonder if
              >> I am possibly repeating what's been done already. Please shed some
              >> light on the subject, is it worth persuing?? I do have these plants
              >> to work with Antelope, Gibraltar, Choptank Seedling from the 2002
              >> Atlanta ARS/ASA Conv, Fireball, Klondyke,Red Sunset,Cecile,Cheerful
              >> Giant,Jane ABbott,Austrium from the 2003 ASA Chattanoga Conv, Red
              >> Velvet,George Reynolds,Windsor Buttercup,Homebush, N.L.wHITE lIGHTS,
              >> yELLOW POM-POM, red POM-POM,HI-LITES, Frank abbott,Yellow Giant,TRI-
              >> LIGHTS,Moonlight Rose, Rosy LIGHTS, aRNESON rUBY, Yellow cloud, White
              >> Swan, Viscosum from East Fork nursery, Golden lights, Mandarin
              >> Lights, Snowbird,Parade,Salmon delight, Better letter., WHERE DOES
              >> one begin the task of becomimg crazy with this virus??
              >>
              >> Thanks so much for any input.
              >>
              >> Tadeusz- Board Memnber Lake Michigan Chapter of ASA,
              >> Membership renewal chair -Midwest Chapter ARS.
              >>
              >> IT'S in the 80's with much needed rain drops coming down in the
              >> Chicago area.
              >>
              >>
            • William C. Miller III
              Bill (Sweeney), Thank you for the information about this additional hybrid group from New Hampshire. I knew my list would not be complete but I figured it was
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 7, 2004
                Bill (Sweeney),

                Thank you for the information about this additional hybrid group from
                New Hampshire. I knew my list would not be complete but I figured it
                was a good start and it reflected my experience.... or lack of
                experience. I was sure that other folks would contribute additional
                names.

                I drew a total blank on the Cherokee Series, but Google provided a
                reference to a Spring 2000 Rosebay article by Joe Parks that is
                available online. I could be mistaken, but I don't remember the
                article being picked up by JARS, and I know that there hasn't been
                anything in THE AZALEAN. It is not going to help matters that a
                Cherokee Series of deciduous azaleas already exists (Galle1, p 110)....
                or that several of Gartrell's Cripple Creek hybrids incorporate the word
                "Cherokee" in six of his evergreen cultivar names (Galle1, p 283).

                Bill Miller
                Bethesda, Maryland



                William Sweeney wrote:

                > Bill & Tadeusz
                >
                > To that list should definitely be added Joe Parks <joeb@...> of
                > New Hampshire. His wonderful series of 'Cherokee' hybrids includes many
                > very hardy, brightly colorful, fragrant, mildew and caterpillar
                > resistant plants! He has been trying for some time to get them
                > distributed in the trade.
                >
                > Joe: Are any of your Cherokees available commercially right now?
                >
                > Bill Sweeney
                > Concord, Mass
                >
                >
              • iltkyao
                Thanks so much all for replying to my post. Prez Sweeney; Joe Parks did create some wonderful hybrids, I have been aware of them since the Rosebay article was
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 7, 2004
                  Thanks so much all for replying to my post.

                  Prez Sweeney;

                  Joe Parks did create some wonderful hybrids, I have been aware of
                  them since the Rosebay article was posted back in 2000, being a
                  associate member of Mass Chapter, I e-mailed Joe Parks back in 2001
                  about those hybrids, his answer at that time was that he could not
                  get anyone (nursery) to propagate/deliver to general public, and that
                  he did not have the facility to that himself. I have also tried to
                  possibly obtain them along with "Joe Parks Rhodies" from the P4M ; I
                  wrote to Cubs fan (wait till next year) John P in your chapter about
                  possibility of obtaining them thru the P4M. John and Sally queried
                  the P4M chair thru e-mail whether that was viable, they even
                  volunteered to put them aside and ship them to me, as part of their
                  order- no dice again, I do thank John/Sally for doing that for me..
                  So I guess I have to make a long trip next year
                  to visit Beantown and go to P4M sale. I did inform my Prez (Lake
                  Michigan Chapter of ASA ) about these Cherokee series, he contacted
                  Joe Parks and looks like finally they will be available for general
                  public thru Syringa Plus and Stoneboro in Pa. We have ordered some
                  for the 2005 ASA convention in Holland , Michigan. Thus Joe Parks
                  hybrids will be tried in Midwest.

                  thanks.

                  Tadeusz- rain leaving Illinois heading to the East Coast.


                  I do understand

                  In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, William Sweeney <sweeneyw@c...> wrote:
                  > Bill & Tadeusz
                  >
                  > To that list should definitely be added Joe Parks <joeb@t...> of
                  > New Hampshire. His wonderful series of 'Cherokee' hybrids includes
                  many
                  > very hardy, brightly colorful, fragrant, mildew and caterpillar
                  > resistant plants! He has been trying for some time to get them
                  > distributed in the trade.
                  >
                  > Joe: Are any of your Cherokees available commercially right now?
                  >
                  > Bill Sweeney
                  > Concord, Mass
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • S. M. Henning
                  Deciduous azaleas can take full sun or partial shade. However, in full sun, the flowers will bleach more quickly, even though the plants grow well. They do
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 11, 2007
                    Deciduous azaleas can take full sun or partial shade. However, in
                    full sun, the flowers will bleach more quickly, even though the
                    plants grow well. They do not bloom well in shade.
                    --

                    Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA

                    http://rhodyman.net
                  • George Klump
                    11 May 2007 Steve, My deciduous azaleas are sitting out in full sun all the time, big as life and twice as natural. The colors have not bleached. One is a
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 11, 2007
                      11 May 2007
                       
                      Steve,
                       
                      My deciduous azaleas are sitting out in full sun all the time, big as life and twice as natural.  The colors have not bleached.  One is a brilliant yellow-orange: that's Klondike.  The colors which will bleach here in the sun are those which lean toward the salmon pink or just salmon color.  I do have a Satsuki, Eikan, out in the afternoon sun.  It has all kinds of colors on it, but some are salmon color and for some reason they do not seem to fade at all.  Don't know why.  I suppose if it sat in full sun all day, that might be another story.  In any event it is our experience out here that the salmon colored flowers do tend to fade, if there is to be any fading, whereas the other colors seem to hold fast.
                       
                      George Klump
                      Southern California Chapter
                       
                       
                       

                      Deciduous azaleas can take full sun or partial shade. However, in
                      full sun, the flowers will bleach more quickly, even though the
                      plants grow well. They do not bloom well in shade.
                      --

                      Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA

                      http://rhodyman. net

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