Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Success in rooting cuttings can be just one

Expand Messages
  • Mike Creel
    I have found that success in rooting cuttings, azalea or rhododendron cuttings in particlular, can be just ONE out of any number stuck. If you aresticking
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 1, 2007
      I have found that success in rooting cuttings, azalea
      or rhododendron cuttings in particlular, can be just
      ONE out of any number stuck.

      If you aresticking cuttings of anything rare and
      precious, especially field collected cuttings, ONE
      well-rooted cutting out of 20 or more should be
      considered 100 percent success, if your intent is to
      copy the exceptional plant (perhaps to establish a
      stock cloned plant of an exceptional form,, to use in
      later propagation), not produce hundreds for commerce.


      Ocassionally I do root a high percentage of the
      cuttings in a pot, and that just means I have more
      plants to give away. Three is the most I ever keep of
      a selection or variety.

      The most difficult cuttings to root are those that
      other people collect and send to you. Next most
      difficult are those I collect in the field on a trip.
      The easiest are cuttings from plants I am growing in
      my woods or garden, since I can choose the ideal time,
      multiple times really, for sticking cuttings.

      I strive to produce at least one strong rooted cutting
      per new cultivar propagated. For my purposes the
      cutting should always be woody, not half-ripe or soft,
      unless that is what someone gives you. And then you
      just work with what you have, which often spells
      success. Half-ripe cuttings work much better for
      evergreen azaleas than deciduous ones in my
      experience.

      Leaves are always a consideration when you stick
      growing season cuttings. If the leaves are fully
      matured, remove the lowest ones, cut off the stem tip
      and cut other leaves in half on an angle. If the
      cutting has soft leaves and any soft, green growth,
      those should be removed, which forces the stem to
      start the season over.

      People regularly ask me when it the best time to take
      and stick cuttings. My usual reply is: "Anytime I can
      get something exceptional," or "Do you have some now."

      I like woody cuttings whenever I can get good ones
      that have been cut well and kept well,
      preferably in late summer, fall and in winter,
      preferring just before winter's end, pre-spring I call
      it. With dormant cuttings in very late fall, winter
      and pre-spring, you don't have to worry about leaves,
      just remove the terminal buds and bloom buds. Dormant
      cuttings keep better in the fridge than leafy
      cuttings, always in an inflated zip-closing bag with
      no added moisture other than the breath needed for
      inflating the bag.

      As a way-out experiment I have some deciduous azalea
      cuttings, woody and half-ripe that seem to be rooting
      in a floating pot of sphagnum moss in my garden pond.
      So far they are living. I rooted some Clethra
      alnifolia in the same pot last season and an evergreen
      azalea.


      Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
      Nature is my Greenhouse
      Join the Azalea Society of America
      http://www.azaleas.org
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.