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this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC]

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  • Cindy Remaley
    this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC] I fell in love with these plants on a recent trip to Calabash, N.C. Can I grow Azaleas in Central New
    Message 1 of 26 , Apr 19, 2007
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      this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC]
       
      I fell in love with these plants on a recent trip to Calabash, N.C.  Can I grow Azaleas in Central New York?  What type would be best?
       
      Cindy Remaley
       
    • Richard Strenkowski
      I am a Master Gardener in Williamsburg Virginia. I received a inquiry form a friend of mine on an Azalea problem he is having. The e-mail stated Hate to
      Message 2 of 26 , Aug 5, 2008
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        I am a Master Gardener in Williamsburg Virginia . I received a inquiry form a friend of mine on an Azalea problem he is having. The e-mail stated

         

        Hate to bother you but in your Master Gardeners  experience do you know anything about azalea disease .

         

        I have a large – 7’X12’  azalea in my front yard that has rusty looking leaves with about half of the limbs dying. The bush has been strong and healthy until this spring when I saw a dead limb – now there are several. I’d like to save it if possible”. 

         

        You should know we are currently in a severe drought in our area…only about 2” of rain in the past 12 weeks.

        I will have to visit his home site to see this plant but can you offer some direction on what to look for?

        Thanks

        Rich Strenkowski

         

         

      • Steve & Darlene Henning
        Hi Rich, The damage is consistent with drought damage. Drought can cause entire branches or entire plants to die. We have had several years of drought here
        Message 3 of 26 , Aug 5, 2008
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          Hi Rich,

          The damage is consistent with drought damage. Drought can cause
          entire branches or entire plants to die. We have had several years of
          drought here and we observe that if rhododendrons and azaleas are not
          watered during a drought some plants will die, but others will just
          have one section of the plant die. It seems to be the plants way to
          conserve what little moisture it has. Prolonged drought weakens plants
          and often results in the appearance of fungal cankers on the branches
          of older azaleas. Look for branches that wilt in hot, dry weather in
          late summer and be sure to water azaleas if drought drags on more than
          a few weeks. Prune out the affected branches to stop the spread of
          fungal canker diseases.

          Too much water is even worse, so advise that though they need watering
          do not over water. The leaves should look wilted in the heat of the
          day. That is normal. If they look wilted in the morning, then they
          need water. They need a moist well-drained soil.

          --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Strenkowski"
          <strenkowski@...> wrote:
          >
          > I am a Master Gardener in Williamsburg Virginia. I received a
          inquiry form a
          > friend of mine on an Azalea problem he is having. The e-mail stated
          >
          > "Hate to bother you but in your Master Gardeners experience do you know
          > anything about azalea disease .
          >
          > I have a large - 7'X12' azalea in my front yard that has rusty looking
          > leaves with about half of the limbs dying. The bush has been strong and
          > healthy until this spring when I saw a dead limb - now there are
          several.
          > I'd like to save it if possible".
          >
          > You should know we are currently in a severe drought in our
          area.only about
          > 2" of rain in the past 12 weeks.
          >
          > I will have to visit his home site to see this plant but can you
          offer some
          > direction on what to look for?
          >
          > Thanks
          >
          > Rich Strenkowski
        • Dee Neff
          this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC] I have a hill of azeleas that have developed a flat, fan/like fungus on all the branches. Can you tell
          Message 4 of 26 , Feb 7 11:10 AM
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            this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC]
             
            I have a hill of azeleas that have developed a flat, fan/like fungus on all the branches.   Can you tell me what this is and how I can treat it.  We live in Georgia so the climate is mild.
             
            Thanks for your prompt attention.

            D

          • Bob Stelloh
            Dee, Thanks for asking us. From your description, it might be lichen. Lichens are symbiotic organisms of fungi and algae. See
            Message 5 of 26 , Feb 9 8:02 AM
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              Dee,

              Thanks for asking us.

              From your description, it might be lichen. Lichens are symbiotic
              organisms of fungi and algae. See
              http://www.pbase.com/azaleasociety/image/82092061 for a picture of
              lichens on an azalea, and see http://www.lichen.com/ for a lot more
              information on lichens.

              If they are lichens, you can relax, as they live on the surface and
              do not harm the plants. If you don't like the look, painting the
              branches with cooking oil will make the lichens disappear in a month
              or so.

              Regards,
              Bob Stelloh Hendersonville NC USDA Zone 7



              At 2:10 PM -0500 on 2/7/09, Dee Neff wrote
              this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC]

              I have a hill of azeleas that have developed a flat, fan/like fungus
              on all the branches. Can you tell me what this is and how I can
              treat it. We live in Georgia so the climate is mild.

              Thanks for your prompt attention.

              D
            • Warren Groomes
              At a recent trip to Myakka State Park near Sarasota Florida, I learned that lichens are an indicator of air quality. There was a beautiful rose pink lichen.
              Message 6 of 26 , Feb 9 9:04 AM
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                At a recent trip to Myakka State Park near Sarasota Florida, I learned that lichens are an indicator of air quality.  There was a beautiful rose pink lichen.  We learned that this particular lichen was very sensitive to air pollution and does not appear in urban areas.  If there is the presence of lichen varieties this indicates good air.  Judy Groomes
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Monday, February 09, 2009 11:02 AM
                Subject: Re: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC]

                Dee,

                Thanks for asking us.

                From your description, it might be lichen. Lichens are symbiotic
                organisms of fungi and algae. See
                http://www.pbase. com/azaleasociet y/image/82092061 for a picture of
                lichens on an azalea, and see http://www.lichen. com/ for a lot more
                information on lichens.

                If they are lichens, you can relax, as they live on the surface and
                do not harm the plants. If you don't like the look, painting the
                branches with cooking oil will make the lichens disappear in a month
                or so.

                Regards,
                Bob Stelloh Hendersonville NC USDA Zone 7

                At 2:10 PM -0500 on 2/7/09, Dee Neff wrote
                this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC]

                I have a hill of azeleas that have developed a flat, fan/like fungus
                on all the branches. Can you tell me what this is and how I can
                treat it. We live in Georgia so the climate is mild.

                Thanks for your prompt attention.

                D

              • KarenBeaz@aol.com
                My azaleas have not bloomed in many seasons and now their branches are black - we want to replace them, but are concerned about the soil - do we need to treat
                Message 7 of 26 , Apr 3, 2010
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                  My azaleas have not bloomed in many seasons and now their branches are black - we want to replace them, but are concerned about the soil - do we need to treat it before planting new ones?
                   
                   
                • Tom Schuetz
                  Karen, typically a black coating on azalea branches is from a fungus which thrives on the sweet excretions of sap sucking insects such as Azalea Bark Scale.
                  Message 8 of 26 , Apr 3, 2010
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                    Karen, typically a black coating on azalea branches is from a fungus which thrives on the sweet excretions of sap sucking insects such as Azalea Bark Scale. The following is taken from an article which appeared in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette 8/9/2009.

                    "Soft scale insects such as azalea bark scale or magnolia scale insert their mouthparts right into the phloem, the part of a plant's vascular system that transports the carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis. Insects that feed in the phloem excrete large amounts of honeydew. This very sweet, sticky substance drips onto anything underneath -- plant stems and foliage, or plants growing under infested shrubs -- and can attract bees, yellow jackets and ants that feed on it. Plant foliage and bark can take on a very dark -- even black -- appearance as a secondary fungus known as sooty mold colonizes the honeydew. Sooty mold does not harm plants, but it can be unsightly. Since soft scale insects feed in the phloem, systemic insecticides that move through the plant in the phloem control them pretty easily.

                    There are a number of control options for azalea bark scale. A dormant application of horticultural oil (not dormant oil or Volck oil) helps suffocate some of the overwintering, immature adults. It may be getting too late for a dormant application of horticultural oil, but if your azaleas have not started to leaf out or bloom, go ahead and spray them.

                    You can mechanically remove the insects by picking them off the stems. If you do this religiously, every time you notice one of the adults, you can eventually get rid of the population. You can also monitor the plant, starting in late June, for the very tiny, reddish crawlers. A magnifying glass is helpful to see them clearly, but they are visible to the naked eye.

                    Horticultural oil works very well to control crawlers, although you will have to make repeated applications, according to label directions. Horticultural oil has no residual once the spray dries, which makes it safer for pollinators and beneficial insects that visit the plant or feed on the scale.

                    Other crawler sprays that have a longer residual include Orthene (acephate), Sevin (carbaryl) and malathion. Bayer Advanced Tree and Shrub Insect Control (imidacloprid) provides season-long, systemic control of azalea bark scale. It is applied as a soil drench around the base of affected plants in late spring. Be sure to pay attention to label directions when using Bayer Advanced Tree and Shrub Insect Control. You have to pull any mulch back and apply the product to bare soil, water it in, and then replace the mulch. It is also important that the soil around affected plants is moist prior to treatment. If not, water them thoroughly prior to application."

                    Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09101/962012-47.stm?cmpid=news.xml#ixzz0k3LqoHgo

                    If you remove and replant azaleas, I would use Bayer advanced Tree and Shrub Insect Control which is available in both liquid and granular formulations to make sure the eggs or nymphs are destroyed. I prefer the granular type because the insecticide does not become airborne. It takes about a month or so to become effective.

                    Tom Schuetz
                    schuetz101@...
                    Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Saturday, April 03, 2010 9:21 AM
                    Subject: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC]

                     

                    My azaleas have not bloomed in many seasons and now their branches are black - we want to replace them, but are concerned about the soil - do we need to treat it before planting new ones?
                     
                     

                  • Tom Schuetz
                    Karen, typically a black coating on azalea branches is from a fungus which thrives on the sweet excretions of sap sucking insects such as Azalea Bark Scale.
                    Message 9 of 26 , Apr 3, 2010
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                      Karen, typically a black coating on azalea branches is from a fungus which thrives on the sweet excretions of sap sucking insects such as Azalea Bark Scale. The following is taken from an article which appeared in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette 8/9/2009.
                       

                      "Soft scale insects such as azalea bark scale or magnolia scale insert their mouthparts right into the phloem, the part of a plant's vascular system that transports the carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis. Insects that feed in the phloem excrete large amounts of honeydew. This very sweet, sticky substance drips onto anything underneath -- plant stems and foliage, or plants growing under infested shrubs -- and can attract bees, yellow jackets and ants that feed on it. Plant foliage and bark can take on a very dark -- even black -- appearance as a secondary fungus known as sooty mold colonizes the honeydew. Sooty mold does not harm plants, but it can be unsightly. Since soft scale insects feed in the phloem, systemic insecticides that move through the plant in the phloem control them pretty easily.

                      There are a number of control options for azalea bark scale. A dormant application of horticultural oil (not dormant oil or Volck oil) helps suffocate some of the overwintering, immature adults. It may be getting too late for a dormant application of horticultural oil, but if your azaleas have not started to leaf out or bloom, go ahead and spray them.

                      You can mechanically remove the insects by picking them off the stems. If you do this religiously, every time you notice one of the adults, you can eventually get rid of the population. You can also monitor the plant, starting in late June, for the very tiny, reddish crawlers. A magnifying glass is helpful to see them clearly, but they are visible to the naked eye.

                      Horticultural oil works very well to control crawlers, although you will have to make repeated applications, according to label directions. Horticultural oil has no residual once the spray dries, which makes it safer for pollinators and beneficial insects that visit the plant or feed on the scale.

                      Other crawler sprays that have a longer residual include Orthene (acephate), Sevin (carbaryl) and malathion. Bayer Advanced Tree and Shrub Insect Control (imidacloprid) provides season-long, systemic control of azalea bark scale. It is applied as a soil drench around the base of affected plants in late spring. Be sure to pay attention to label directions when using Bayer Advanced Tree and Shrub Insect Control. You have to pull any mulch back and apply the product to bare soil, water it in, and then replace the mulch. It is also important that the soil around affected plants is moist prior to treatment. If not, water them thoroughly prior to application."

                      Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09101/962012-47.stm?cmpid=news.xml#ixzz0k3LqoHgo

                      If you remove and replant azaleas, I would use Bayer advanced Tree and Shrub Insect Control which is available in both liquid and granular formulations. I prefer the granular type because the insecticide does not become airborne. It takes about a month to become effective.

                      Tom Schuetz
                      schuetz101@...
                      Mechanicsburg, PA   USDA Zone 6a
                    • John Robbins
                      Dear Azalea Society: I just finished planting a large quantity of 7 gallon azaleas and used Hollytone (1 cup per plant) in the amended soil mix, which was made
                      Message 10 of 26 , Apr 26, 2010
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                        Dear Azalea Society:
                         
                        I just finished planting a large quantity of 7 gallon azaleas and used Hollytone (1 cup per plant) in the amended soil mix, which was made by adding 1/3 compost (with some manure) and 2/3 soil.  I am now hearing and reading that when first planting fertilizer is not recommended.  So, I am worrying that the plants will not do well because of the Hollytone I added. 
                         
                        Question - should I be worried and is there anything I can do now that the plants are in the ground to help them?
                         
                        I love these plants and really want them to do well.  Thank you so much for your advice.
                         
                         
                        Sincerely,
                        John Robbins

                      • Jim Willhite
                        John, I use Hollytone when I transplant azaleas from the pot. They seem to respond well. It is a gentle fertilizer. (I typically don t use any fertilizer
                        Message 11 of 26 , Apr 26, 2010
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                          John, I use Hollytone when I transplant azaleas from the pot. They
                          seem to respond well. It is a gentle fertilizer. (I typically don't
                          use any fertilizer after the plant is established.)

                          I cup per plant sounds like quite a bit more than I would typically
                          use, but then again, 7 gallon plants would have pretty good size root
                          balls, so if you spread the HT around, you're probably OK. In
                          addition, HT is fairly benign stuff. I'm not saying you could never
                          overdo it using HT, but it would take quite a heavy hand I would think.
                          If you were really worried about over fertilizing, you could try to
                          wash some of it off/out, run a hose on the plants, but this time of
                          year (at least in our area--Chester County, PA) rainfall is plentiful,
                          so it will likely wash through rather quickly anyway.

                          The question I had about your note was not about HT; but rather: did
                          you really rip up the root balls on your plants before you planted
                          them? Plants that have spent their whole lives in pots and grown to
                          the 7-g size could be fairly substantially root bound. You can't just
                          pop them out of the pots and put them in the hole you have prepared.
                          Those roots will not flare like you want them to, and the plant will
                          not establish itself in its new place, if you haven't worked that root
                          ball to be sure that it does not continue to hold that pot bound shape
                          after planting. The bigger the potted plant, the more critical this
                          becomes. Does this make sense? Let me know if you need elaboration.

                          jim willhite
                          west chester, pa



                          On Monday, April 26, 2010, at 07:43 PM, John Robbins wrote:

                          >  
                          > Dear Azalea Society:
                          >  
                          > I just finished planting a large quantity of 7 gallon azaleas and used
                          > Hollytone (1 cup per plant) in the amended soil mix, which was made by
                          > adding 1/3 compost (with some manure) and 2/3 soil.  I am now hearing
                          > and reading that when first planting fertilizer is not recommended. 
                          > So, I am worrying that the plants will not do well because of the
                          > Hollytone I added. 
                          >  
                          > Question - should I be worried and is there anything I can do now that
                          > the plants are in the ground to help them?
                          >  
                          > I love these plants and really want them to do well.  Thank you so
                          > much for your advice.
                          >  
                          >  
                          > Sincerely,
                          > John Robbins
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          Jim Willhite
                          West Chester, PA
                        • John Migas
                          In my experiences I normally fertilize after the plants flower. Some may say that fertilizers may stunt the blooms. The only fertilizers that I suggest using
                          Message 12 of 26 , May 2, 2010
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                            In my experiences I normally fertilize after the plants flower. Some may say that fertilizers may stunt the blooms. The only fertilizers that I suggest using when planting is a small amount of "starter fertilizer" mixed in the soils. Hollytone is a great product and shouldn't hurt the plants.
                            Use a small amount of azalea fertilizer well after the blooms for the first season.
                            Good luck..........John Migas
                             
                             
                            .
                            --- On Mon, 4/26/10, John Robbins <allieandjr1@...> wrote:

                            From: John Robbins <allieandjr1@...>
                            Subject: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC]
                            To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Monday, April 26, 2010, 7:43 PM

                             
                            Dear Azalea Society:
                             
                            I just finished planting a large quantity of 7 gallon azaleas and used Hollytone (1 cup per plant) in the amended soil mix, which was made by adding 1/3 compost (with some manure) and 2/3 soil.  I am now hearing and reading that when first planting fertilizer is not recommended.  So, I am worrying that the plants will not do well because of the Hollytone I added. 
                             
                            Question - should I be worried and is there anything I can do now that the plants are in the ground to help them?
                             
                            I love these plants and really want them to do well.  Thank you so much for your advice.
                             
                             
                            Sincerely,
                            John Robbins


                          • Ron Rabideau
                            John, Nothing to worry about. Holly Tone is slow-release. I do recommend fertilizing at planting time at least with superphosphate blended into the backfill as
                            Message 13 of 26 , May 2, 2010
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                              John,
                              Nothing to worry about. Holly Tone is slow-release. I do recommend
                              fertilizing at planting time at least with superphosphate blended into the
                              backfill as it does not leach out of the soil with water as N and K do and
                              will be there wehn the roots need it.

                              Ron Rabideau

                              On Mon, 26 Apr 2010 20:43:11 -0300, John Robbins <allieandjr1@...>
                              wrote:

                              > Dear Azalea Society:
                              >
                              > I just finished planting a large quantity of 7 gallon azaleas and used
                              > Hollytone (1 cup per plant) in the amended soil mix, which was made by
                              > adding 1/3 compost (with some manure) and 2/3 soil. I am now hearing
                              > and reading that when first planting fertilizer is not recommended. So,
                              > I am worrying that the plants will not do well because of the Hollytone
                              > I added.
                              > Question - should I be worried and is there anything I can do now that
                              > the plants are in the ground to help them?
                              >
                              > I love these plants and really want them to do well. Thank you so much
                              > for your advice.
                              >
                              >
                              > Sincerely,
                              > John Robbins
                              >
                              >


                              --
                              Ron Rabideau
                              Camden, NJ
                              Zone 6b-7a
                            • angeline
                              I have an azalea approximately 2 years old. I was instructed by a local nursery to spray it for winter protection with Wilt Stop to protect it for winter. I
                              Message 14 of 26 , Apr 17, 2011
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                                 I have an azalea approximately 2 years old.  I was instructed by a local nursery to spray it for winter protection with Wilt Stop to protect it for winter.  I live in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan.  The leaves on it from last year are all brown and will drop off if I touch them.  I’ve bent a few of the stems and they are green inside.  Will I get new leaf growth on it this spring?  The guy at the nursery told me to spray it with Wilt Stop because I had wrapped it in burlap for it’s first winter and when spring came last year I didn’t get any blooms and the leaves had brown tips.  He said that since azaleas are considered evergreens that I didn’t need to wrap it at all and just to spray it.  I’m now wondering if I was given wrong instructions.  Can anyone help me?  Thank you.

                                 

                                Ann Marie

                              • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
                                I assume it is an evergreen azalea . . Is that correct? Depending on variety, I expect it will regenerate leaves. My evergreen azaleas lose leaves
                                Message 15 of 26 , Apr 17, 2011
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                                  I assume it is an evergreen azalea . .   Is that correct?
                                  Depending on variety, I expect it will regenerate leaves.
                                  My evergreen azaleas lose leaves occasionally and they return each year.
                                  Nick Yarmoshuk
                                  St.Catharines ON Canada

                                  On Sun, Apr 17, 2011 at 11:53 AM, angeline <avido9880@...> wrote:
                                   

                                   I have an azalea approximately 2 years old.  I was instructed by a local nursery to spray it for winter protection with Wilt Stop to protect it for winter.  I live in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan.  The leaves on it from last year are all brown and will drop off if I touch them.  I’ve bent a few of the stems and they are green inside.  Will I get new leaf growth on it this spring?  The guy at the nursery told me to spray it with Wilt Stop because I had wrapped it in burlap for it’s first winter and when spring came last year I didn’t get any blooms and the leaves had brown tips.  He said that since azaleas are considered evergreens that I didn’t need to wrap it at all and just to spray it.  I’m now wondering if I was given wrong instructions.  Can anyone help me?  Thank you.

                                   

                                  Ann Marie


                                • michael.campbell3@comcast.net
                                  wiltpruf didn t hurt your plant Are you zone 5? Many (nearly all) of my evergreen azaleas are nearly deciduous in the SW burbs of chicago ... From: angeline
                                  Message 16 of 26 , Apr 17, 2011
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                                    wiltpruf didn't hurt your plant

                                    Are you zone 5?  Many (nearly all) of my evergreen azaleas are nearly deciduous in the SW burbs of chicago

                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: "angeline" <avido9880@...>
                                    To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Sunday, April 17, 2011 10:53:01 AM
                                    Subject: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC]

                                     

                                     I have an azalea approximately 2 years old.  I was instructed by a local nursery to spray it for winter protection with Wilt Stop to protect it for winter.  I live in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan.  The leaves on it from last year are all brown and will drop off if I touch them.  I’ve bent a few of the stems and they are green inside.  Will I get new leaf growth on it this spring?  The guy at the nursery told me to spray it with Wilt Stop because I had wrapped it in burlap for it’s first winter and when spring came last year I didn’t get any blooms and the leaves had brown tips.  He said that since azaleas are considered evergreens that I didn’t need to wrap it at all and just to spray it.  I’m now wondering if I was given wrong instructions.  Can anyone help me?  Thank you.

                                     

                                    Ann Marie

                                  • Alan Joyner
                                    We live in Richmond, VA. Our house is about 50 years old and we have been in it for 10 years. Between the two very large oaks in my front yard are 4 azaleas
                                    Message 17 of 26 , Apr 18, 2011
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                                      We live in Richmond, VA.  Our house is about 50 years old and we have been in it for 10 years.  Between the two very large oaks in my front yard are 4 azaleas which I can only describe as ground cover.  They do not bloom until May, are spread out about four or five feet from tip to tip and no more than 8” to 10” high. The blooms are mixed red and white.

                                       

                                      My problem is that one of them has lost its foliage in the center and may be dying.  My wife is driving me crazy to replace it.  None of the local nurseries have ever heard of anything like this.  I know I can start a cutting or just root one off one of the others, but this will take quite awhile to fill in the bare spot.  We have alternating red & white azaleas across the front of the house but they are the “normal” upright varieties.

                                       

                                      If anyone can let me know what variety this is and where I may be able to purchase a replacement (preferably in VA or MD) I would be very grateful.

                                       

                                      Thanks in advance for your help.

                                       

                                      Alan Joyner

                                      Henrico, VA

                                    • Larry Wallace
                                      These are hybrids of Rhododendron *nakaharai. They began as the North Tisbury Azaleas at Polly Hill Arboretum. Many others have crossed with this plant. I
                                      Message 18 of 26 , Apr 18, 2011
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                                        These are hybrids of Rhododendron nakaharai.  They began as the North Tisbury Azaleas at Polly Hill Arboretum.  Many others have crossed with this plant.  I have three 'Mt. Seven Star' on  the way.  The hybrid 'Wintergreen' is one of the more popular.  'Pink Pancake' is probably the flattest

                                        www.pollyhillarboretum.org/ 
                                        Azaleas.org/joinus.html


                                        -- 
                                        Larry Wallace
                                        Cincinnati
                                      • Sims Floyd
                                        this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC is it difficult to successfully transplant older azaleas? possibly 20 or more years old? are there special
                                        Message 19 of 26 , Aug 9, 2011
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                                          this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC
                                           
                                          is it difficult to successfully transplant older azaleas?
                                          possibly 20 or more years old?
                                           
                                          are there special precautions i should take to ensure
                                          that they live?
                                           
                                          thank you,
                                          sims

                                           
                                           
                                        • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
                                          Are you referring to deciduous azaleas or evergreen azaleas? Where in the world is this azalea growing? .. The former, large Dec Azaleas, are very
                                          Message 20 of 26 , Aug 9, 2011
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                                            Are you referring to deciduous azaleas or evergreen azaleas?    Where in the world is this azalea growing?
                                            ..
                                            The former,  large Dec Azaleas,  are very reluctant to be transplanted and sulk for several years after the operation.   Large Evergreen azaleas are easier to transplant.  The seem to adapt better.

                                            Be sure to water them in well and be sure to have excellent drainage.   If you are in the south, or anywhere where the temperature is likely to be above 70F and there is not daily rain, be certain to establish a fine misting system so that they are well hydrated daily during the heat of the day.

                                            Prepare a shallow hole before you start the operation and take a big wide root.   Trim back 40% of each branch before transplanting.  

                                            Good Luck. 

                                            Nick Yarmoshuk
                                            Near Niagara Falls Canada

                                            On Tue, Aug 9, 2011 at 3:53 PM, Sims Floyd <sfloyd@...> wrote:
                                             

                                            this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC
                                             
                                            is it difficult to successfully transplant older azaleas?
                                            possibly 20 or more years old?
                                             
                                            are there special precautions i should take to ensure
                                            that they live?
                                             
                                            thank you,
                                            sims

                                             
                                             




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                                          • William C. Miller III
                                            Nick, Did you send a separate message to the poster? The header suggests that the poster didn t get your reply. Bill
                                            Message 21 of 26 , Aug 9, 2011
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                                              Nick,

                                              Did you send a separate message to the poster?  The header suggests that the poster didn't get your reply.

                                              Bill

                                              
                                              

                                              Nicholas Yarmoshuk wrote:
                                               

                                              Are you referring to deciduous azaleas or evergreen azaleas?    Where in the world is this azalea growing?
                                              ..
                                              The former,  large Dec Azaleas,  are very reluctant to be transplanted and sulk for several years after the operation.   Large Evergreen azaleas are easier to transplant.  The seem to adapt better.

                                              Be sure to water them in well and be sure to have excellent drainage.   If you are in the south, or anywhere where the temperature is likely to be above 70F and there is not daily rain, be certain to establish a fine misting system so that they are well hydrated daily during the heat of the day.

                                              Prepare a shallow hole before you start the operation and take a big wide root.   Trim back 40% of each branch before transplanting.  

                                              Good Luck. 

                                              Nick Yarmoshuk
                                              Near Niagara Falls Canada

                                              On Tue, Aug 9, 2011 at 3:53 PM, Sims Floyd <sfloyd@...> wrote:
                                               

                                              this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC
                                               
                                              is it difficult to successfully transplant older azaleas?
                                              possibly 20 or more years old?
                                               
                                              are there special precautions i should take to ensure
                                              that they live?
                                               
                                              thank you,
                                              sims

                                               
                                               



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                                            • Nicholas Yarmoshuk
                                              Yes I did send a separate message to the poster . . . it went as a forward because I did not cc in the original. Nick On Tue, Aug 9, 2011 at 8:34 PM, William
                                              Message 22 of 26 , Aug 9, 2011
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                                                Yes I did send a separate message to the poster . . . it went as a forward because I did not cc in the original.
                                                Nick

                                                On Tue, Aug 9, 2011 at 8:34 PM, William C. Miller III <bill@...> wrote:
                                                 

                                                Nick,

                                                Did you send a separate message to the poster?  The header suggests that the poster didn't get your reply.

                                                Bill


                                                Nicholas Yarmoshuk wrote:
                                                 

                                                Are you referring to deciduous azaleas or evergreen azaleas?    Where in the world is this azalea growing?
                                                ..
                                                The former,  large Dec Azaleas,  are very reluctant to be transplanted and sulk for several years after the operation.   Large Evergreen azaleas are easier to transplant.  The seem to adapt better.

                                                Be sure to water them in well and be sure to have excellent drainage.   If you are in the south, or anywhere where the temperature is likely to be above 70F and there is not daily rain, be certain to establish a fine misting system so that they are well hydrated daily during the heat of the day.

                                                Prepare a shallow hole before you start the operation and take a big wide root.   Trim back 40% of each branch before transplanting.  

                                                Good Luck. 

                                                Nick Yarmoshuk
                                                Near Niagara Falls Canada

                                                On Tue, Aug 9, 2011 at 3:53 PM, Sims Floyd <sfloyd@...> wrote:
                                                 

                                                this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC
                                                 
                                                is it difficult to successfully transplant older azaleas?
                                                possibly 20 or more years old?
                                                 
                                                are there special precautions i should take to ensure
                                                that they live?
                                                 
                                                thank you,
                                                sims

                                                 
                                                 



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                                              • Tadeusz Dauksza
                                                Sims;    I would wait till your S.Carolina temps go down to lower 60 s and thus your older azaleas would not suffer too-much damage due to those very hot
                                                Message 23 of 26 , Aug 11, 2011
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                                                  Sims;
                                                   
                                                   I would wait till your S.Carolina temps go down to lower 60's and thus your older azaleas would not suffer too-much damage due to those very hot days.
                                                   
                                                  Tadeusz - LM

                                                  From: Nicholas Yarmoshuk <rhodosrus@...>
                                                  To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Sent: Tuesday, August 9, 2011 7:57 PM
                                                  Subject: Re: [AZ] this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC]

                                                   
                                                  Yes I did send a separate message to the poster . . . it went as a forward because I did not cc in the original.
                                                  Nick

                                                  On Tue, Aug 9, 2011 at 8:34 PM, William C. Miller III <bill@...> wrote:
                                                   
                                                  Nick,

                                                  Did you send a separate message to the poster?  The header suggests that the poster didn't get your reply.

                                                  Bill


                                                  Nicholas Yarmoshuk wrote:
                                                   
                                                  Are you referring to deciduous azaleas or evergreen azaleas?    Where in the world is this azalea growing?
                                                  ..
                                                  The former,  large Dec Azaleas,  are very reluctant to be transplanted and sulk for several years after the operation.   Large Evergreen azaleas are easier to transplant.  The seem to adapt better.

                                                  Be sure to water them in well and be sure to have excellent drainage.   If you are in the south, or anywhere where the temperature is likely to be above 70F and there is not daily rain, be certain to establish a fine misting system so that they are well hydrated daily during the heat of the day.

                                                  Prepare a shallow hole before you start the operation and take a big wide root.   Trim back 40% of each branch before transplanting.  

                                                  Good Luck. 

                                                  Nick Yarmoshuk
                                                  Near Niagara Falls Canada

                                                  On Tue, Aug 9, 2011 at 3:53 PM, Sims Floyd <sfloyd@...> wrote:
                                                   
                                                  this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC
                                                   
                                                  is it difficult to successfully transplant older azaleas?
                                                  possibly 20 or more years old?
                                                   
                                                  are there special precautions i should take to ensure
                                                  that they live?
                                                   
                                                  thank you,
                                                  sims

                                                   
                                                   



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                                                • stephany jones
                                                  this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC] Hi my name is Stephanie, I live in wv. I purchased an azalea x conlea to put in my flower garden. Instead
                                                  Message 24 of 26 , Apr 11, 2012
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                                                    this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC]

                                                      Hi my name is Stephanie, I live in wv. I purchased an azalea x conlea to put in my flower garden. Instead of planting it right away, I left it outside until I got more dirt, well the weather was nice around 80 deg. and out of no where it started snowing a hailing, but now its back in the 50s- 60s. So my question is, should I bring it in the house? All of the bloomed flowers on it are now withered and Im not certain if the weathers going to be like it was any time soon. any comments would help! Thank you, Stephanie
                                                  • doug garrett
                                                    I live in southern New Jersey just outside of Philadelphia and planted healthy Azaleas last spring in somewhat sandy soil. They bloomed beaufitully. However,
                                                    Message 25 of 26 , Dec 6, 2012
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                                                      I live in southern New Jersey just outside of Philadelphia and planted healthy Azaleas last spring in somewhat sandy soil. They bloomed beaufitully. However, through the summer the leaves turned a pinkish brown and remain that way. They are planted up against a cement wall, about one foot away. I did fertilize lightly with "Miracle Grow for Azaleas" through the growing season. The plants do not seem to be dead, the leaves and stems are soft and not dried out, they just have pinkish brown leaves. But they do appear dead. Any ideas as to what the situation might be?
                                                    • Gino Ginovaccio
                                                      Dear Sirs: What is the best manufacturer for azalea fertilizer?  I have bought Vigoro (10-8-8) and Sunniland (8-48) and there many more.   I value your
                                                      Message 26 of 26 , Aug 11, 2014
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                                                        Dear Sirs:

                                                        What is the best manufacturer for azalea fertilizer? 

                                                        I have bought Vigoro (10-8-8) and Sunniland (8-48) and there many more.  

                                                        I value your recommendation, so that my azaleas can reach their full potential.

                                                        Very respectfully,

                                                        George Eliopoulos

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