Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [AZ] Optimal Shade Cloth for dome pots?

Expand Messages
  • Mike Creel
    Where my pots are is not a problem. My question was IF I used a shade cloth that allows more light through can I speed up growth of cuttings in sealed domes
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 31, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Where my pots are is not a problem. My question was IF
      I used a shade cloth that allows more light through
      can I speed up growth of cuttings in sealed domes
      WITHOUT the domes overheating and boiling the
      cuttings. Currently my shade cloth permits the
      passage of just 30 to 36 percent of the sunlight. I
      cannot create any more unsightly areas in the yard
      such a lining up pots against the wall. I JUST got my
      propagation bench area on the side of my garage near
      the fig trees cleaned up and made orderly. I have one
      large, orderly shade bed well away from the house at
      the old dog pen where there is a sloped concrete pad.
      I still have one sizeable area near the yard of pots
      of rooted cuttings and things that need to be planted
      out. My wife (and me too) wants our yard finally to
      get to the point it looks landscaped and regular
      people can visit, without me having to interpret
      through the clutter.
      Mike Creel, SC
      --- Bruce Clyburn <bclyburn@...> wrote:

      > Question: Have you considered lining your pots up
      > against an east-west oriented fence, house wall, or
      > row of trees, the pots facing north? You should get
      > lots of full indirect light but no sun.
      >
      > Bruce Clyburn
      >
      >
    • Bruce Clyburn
      The circumstances around your needs are specific. I doubt anybody in the group will come back with an equally specific answer like you should use 45% shade
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        The circumstances around your needs are specific. I doubt anybody in the group will come back with an equally specific answer like you should use 45% shade factor. You might have to consider a test program that involves comparing a series of cloths with  various 'densities'. This is expensive unless you live near the manufacturer and can get scrap pieces.
         
        A nursery friend of mine worked exclusively with 'Nearing Propagating Frames' - I remember for whatever reason during the peak of summer they rec'd more sunlight then desired. He would paint the glass sashes with whitewash, a type of inexpensive paint made from slaked lime (calcium hydroxide). (Remember Mark Twain's - The Adventures of Tom Sawyer?) It's water soluble and can be removed with a garden hose spray and scrub brush. The result is translucent and a second coat can reduce sunlight transmittence further.
         
        I can't readily obtain shade cloth up here but because the winters are so harsh the garden centers carry lots of burlap - an open weave jute cloth, very cheap. I use it for my shade cloth when moving seedlings from a winter under lights to the outside.
         
        Anyway just so much 'food for thought'.
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 1:01 AM
        Subject: Re: [AZ] Optimal Shade Cloth for dome pots?

        Where my pots are is not a problem. My question was IF
        I used a shade cloth that allows more light through
        can I speed up growth of cuttings in sealed domes
        WITHOUT the domes overheating and boiling the
        cuttings. Currently my shade cloth permits the
        passage of just 30 to 36 percent of the sunlight. I
        cannot create any more unsightly areas in the yard
        such a lining up pots against the wall. I JUST got my
        propagation bench area on the side of my garage near
        the fig trees cleaned up and made orderly. I have one
        large, orderly shade bed well away from the house at
        the old dog pen where there is a sloped concrete pad.
        I still have one sizeable area near the yard of pots
        of rooted cuttings and things that need to be planted
        out. My wife (and me too) wants our yard finally to
        get to the point it looks landscaped and regular
        people can visit, without me having to interpret
        through the clutter.
        Mike Creel, SC
        --- Bruce Clyburn <bclyburn@ns. sympatico. ca> wrote:

        > Question: Have you considered lining your pots up
        > against an east-west oriented fence, house wall, or
        > row of trees, the pots facing north? You should get
        > lots of full indirect light but no sun.
        >
        > Bruce Clyburn
        >
        >

      • Larry Wallace
        large, orderly shade bed well away from the house at the old dog pen Sounds ripe for Dyemakers Puffballs,* Rhizipogon, Pyrola, Chimaphila, Gaultheria,
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          "large, orderly shade bed well away from the house at the old dog pen"
          Sounds ripe for Dyemakers' Puffballs,* Rhizipogon, Pyrola, Chimaphila, Gaultheria, Arbutus, etc.
          Larry
           
          *a.k.a. Dog Turd Fungus



        • Mike Creel
          Actually no fungus problems at all. When bird dogs were apen, I regularly shoveled out the stuff and rinsed off the sloped concrete pad with a power spray
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Actually no fungus problems at all. When bird dogs
            were apen, I regularly shoveled out "the stuff" and
            rinsed off the sloped concrete pad with a power spray
            nozzle. Plus, nature has worked on the pad for
            several years it lacked dogs or pots. I will send you
            some photos.
            Mike Creel, SC

            --- Larry Wallace <UUallace@...> wrote:

            > "large, orderly shade bed well away from the house
            > at the old dog pen"
            > Sounds ripe for Dyemakers' Puffballs,* Rhizipogon,
            > Pyrola, Chimaphila,
            > Gaultheria, Arbutus, etc.
            > Larry
            >
            > *a.k.a. Dog Turd Fungus
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Larry Wallace
            The *true* fungi Pisolithus and Rhizopogon are not problems. They are necessary for Wintergreens and Arbutus. Pisolithus will produce a fruiting body in
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              The true fungi Pisolithus and Rhizopogon are not problems.  They are necessary for Wintergreens and Arbutus.  Pisolithus will produce a 'fruiting body' in the presence of "the stuff". Just like button mushrooms and horse stuff.
              Larry
               
              Mike was instrumental in the recognition of R. eastmanii as well as the Carolina Boykin variety of Canis extratius  (Canis hyspanicus).

               
            • Mike Creel
              To be exact I was the discoverer and co-author in Novon in September 1999 (with botanist Kathleen Kron) of the species Rhododendron eastmanii, which is now
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 1, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                To be exact I was the "discoverer" and co-author in
                Novon in September 1999 (with botanist Kathleen Kron)
                of the species Rhododendron eastmanii, which is now
                verified in 11 South Carolina counties, but my friend
                Charles Eastman (who I proposed the species be named
                for) who is in his 80s, and has lost both feet, had
                seen the azaleas in woods near his home since
                childhood and had thought they were different.

                My involvement with the Boykin Spaniel dog breed began
                when I was researching an article for a 1975 issue of
                South Carolina Wildlife magazine and wrote that the
                breed would soon become extinct unless lovers of the
                breed organized as a club and set breed standards. An
                association was later formed and the breed prospers
                worldwide. Later I co-authored a lengthy book on the
                breed, ilustrated with mostly my photos. The book was
                a sell out, but the publisher went bankrupt when her
                husband's cabinet business went under. As a result I
                received less than half payment, but the book was
                really a work of love. I would have done it for free.
                I am the only lifetime honorary member of the Boykin
                Spaniel Society, and that is payment enough.
                Mike Creel

                --- Larry Wallace <UUallace@...> wrote:

                >>
                > *Mike was instrumental in the recognition of R.
                > eastmanii as well as the
                > Carolina Boykin variety of Canis extratius (Canis
                > hyspanicus).*
                >
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.