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[AZ] Three highly effective cutting pots

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  • George Klump
    29 December 2006 Mike, Don t worry about what a few others may think here about your potting efforts. It looks to me as if most of your plants have gone to
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 29, 2006
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      29 December 2006
       
      Mike,
       
      Don't worry about what a few others may think here about your potting efforts.  It looks to me as if most of your plants have gone to pot!    J   Actually, what you are trying to do is to find a way of growing cuttings in a fast draining medium under controlled but high humidity conditions necessary for cuttings to have in order to put on roots.  The big trick, we have found, is to catch the rooted cuttings before any type of fungus, especially phytophthora, gets started on the rooted cutting.  We are eventually going to build a new type of propagation table at Descanso Gardens, a table which has been engineered by one of our members, who is a retired aeronautics engineer, a table which will use some electronic control both on bottom temperatures and humidity which latter will probably be handled by an overhead misting system.  As far as we know, it will be a unique propagation table well advanced over propagation methods currently in use at retail nurseries on this coast.  That's our intention and we already have the plans drawn for this.  Now it's a matter of doing it!  We will propagate R. vireya and possibly some R. azalea, maybe some elepidotes, too.  However, the first purpose is the propagation of vireyas. 
       
      In the meantime, carry on with your efforts.  Keep the humidity high and controlled at least till the cutting sends out its roots and, I hope, without any significant fungus growth.  
       
      George K.
       
      P.S. We keep all of our cuttings out of the direct sunlight here.   
       
       
       
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2006 6:57 PM
      Subject: [AZ] Three highly effective cutting pots

      I am trying to document in photos the different things
      I do in propagation and share those photos with the
      public. For really hard to root plants requiring fast
      drainage and a well-aerated root zone I recommend the
      use of rigid mesh pots as shown here in these three
      photos. These pots are intended for use with aquatic
      plants in garden ponds, but they work extremely well
      for rooting and growing woody land plants sensitive to
      saturated media.

      Shown here are three sizes of garden pond mesh pots
      and three sizes of domes. In each photo you can see
      the actual bottle I used to make the propagation dome
      (humidity domes).

      The smallest bottle is a 2 liter clear soft drink
      bottle with the lower third or half cut off, the upper
      part forming the dome. This size of bottle also works
      well in one-gallon nursery pots that have been drilled
      for drainage and just half filled with fast-draining
      media.

      The next largest is a clear 3- liter soft drink
      bottle, which can be used as a shorter or taller dome,
      depending upon the length of the cuttings. This size
      of bottle also works well in two-gallon and larger
      nursery pots that have been drilled for drainage and
      just half filled with fast-draining media.

      The largest dome is made from a one gallon spring
      water bottle made until very recently by the
      Nestle-Perrier company, with two brands having been
      Deer Park and Portland Springs. This size of bottle
      also works well in three-gallon and larger nursery
      pots that have been drilled for drainage (also
      medium-large hanging baskets drilled for drainage) and
      just half filled with fast-draining media.

      I am thinking seriously about creating a separate
      mailing list for my propagation notes outside of the
      Azalea Yahoo Group and stopping distribution of my
      propagation activities and photos to the azalea group.
      There are apparently several people who have become
      tired of my postings, and perhaps offended by them. I
      would appreciate hearing from individuals with special
      interest in my unorthodox propagation methods.

      Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
      Nature is my Greenhouse
      Join the Azalea Society of America
      http://www.azaleas. org

    • S.H.
      Mike, I appreciate the effort that you are expending on various methods of propagation, pots to use, media. I use 3L containers of Cranberry juice as the
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 3, 2007
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        Mike, I appreciate the effort that you are expending on various methods of propagation, pots to use, media.  I use 3L containers of Cranberry juice as the humidity domes, cutting 1-2 inches off of the bottom.  Keep up the good work.  I have tried to save all of the applicable messages, but a single source would really be nice.  I can send more if you would just let me know.
         
        By the way did you receive the container of 'Turface' that we use. We use the Turface with 50% pine bark fines. I am looking to see if we can get a smaller grade that would not have to be sifted.
         
        This may be old hat to some, but it is new to me,  Press on!
         
        Joe Hurlbert, zone 8b, Montgomery, AL
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2006 8:57 PM
        Subject: [AZ] Three highly effective cutting pots

        I am trying to document in photos the different things
        I do in propagation and share those photos with the
        public. For really hard to root plants requiring fast
        drainage and a well-aerated root zone I recommend the
        use of rigid mesh pots as shown here in these three
        photos. These pots are intended for use with aquatic
        plants in garden ponds, but they work extremely well
        for rooting and growing woody land plants sensitive to
        saturated media.

        Shown here are three sizes of garden pond mesh pots
        and three sizes of domes. In each photo you can see
        the actual bottle I used to make the propagation dome
        (humidity domes).

        The smallest bottle is a 2 liter clear soft drink
        bottle with the lower third or half cut off, the upper
        part forming the dome. This size of bottle also works
        well in one-gallon nursery pots that have been drilled
        for drainage and just half filled with fast-draining
        media.

        The next largest is a clear 3- liter soft drink
        bottle, which can be used as a shorter or taller dome,
        depending upon the length of the cuttings. This size
        of bottle also works well in two-gallon and larger
        nursery pots that have been drilled for drainage and
        just half filled with fast-draining media.

        The largest dome is made from a one gallon spring
        water bottle made until very recently by the
        Nestle-Perrier company, with two brands having been
        Deer Park and Portland Springs. This size of bottle
        also works well in three-gallon and larger nursery
        pots that have been drilled for drainage (also
        medium-large hanging baskets drilled for drainage) and
        just half filled with fast-draining media.

        I am thinking seriously about creating a separate
        mailing list for my propagation notes outside of the
        Azalea Yahoo Group and stopping distribution of my
        propagation activities and photos to the azalea group.
        There are apparently several people who have become
        tired of my postings, and perhaps offended by them. I
        would appreciate hearing from individuals with special
        interest in my unorthodox propagation methods.

        Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
        Nature is my Greenhouse
        Join the Azalea Society of America
        http://www.azaleas. org

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