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Re: [AZ] seed collection

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  • Will and Kate Ferrell
    If you are storing the seeds until the spring because your wife will not let you use the bay window again, is it necessary to store them in the refrigerater?
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 5, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      If you are storing the seeds until the spring because your wife will not let you use the bay window again, is it necessary to store them in the refrigerater? 
       
      Will
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006 10:47 AM
      Subject: Re: [AZ] seed collection

      It appears that no one in the azalea group has
      responded to your e-mail or they may have answered you
      separately. In any case I will give you some pointers
      since I have been out this week collecting azalea seed
      pods and cleaning the seeds, to send to seed exchanges
      in the American Rhododendron Society and Azalea
      Society of America.

      The pinky-pink azalea in your coastal Georgia area is
      probably Rhododendron canescens, the hoary azalea,
      which blooms early with no leaves and often grows
      tall, with no running roots.

      Native azalea seed pods resemble small brown banana in
      clusters at upper branch joints and stem ends. Seed
      pods are multi-chambered and split open from the end
      resembling claws. At this time of year most of the
      early and mid-season species will already have spilled
      most of their seeds, BUT you can find seed pods that
      are just half or two-thirds opened (as I did this
      week). If you are careful you CAN collect seeds from
      such pods. More seeds stay in the pod on a wet day
      than dry day. I use coin envelopes to envelop the
      pods before I break them off.

      Keep collected seed pods in a paper (not plastic)
      envelope for a few days inside to dry before cleaning
      seeds. It creates cleaner seeds when you just split
      the splitting seed pods along chamber lines using a
      dull knife edge and let seeds spill out, onto a
      creased sheet of white paper. I use needle nosed
      pliers to spread the splitting pod. Then I work the
      material through a couple of tea strainers to remove
      the larger pod pieces and trash.

      Store the seeds in paper envelopes in your fridge
      until planting. You can plant and grow azalea seeds
      indoors (planted this month) in a clear box half
      filled with long-fiber sphagnum moss, kept under
      fluorescent lights or you can plant them outdoors in
      pots (half full of fast-draining pine bark soil
      conditioner) protected with a cap of 1/4 inch mesh
      hardware cloth, which is what I do. Seeds are quite
      small and elongate.

      Planted indoors on long fiber sphagnum, azalea seeds
      will germinate in just a couple of weeks. Seeds are
      just sprinkled on the surface of the media, not under
      it. Planted in winter in outdoor pots, the seeds may
      not germinate until spring, which is not a problem.

      You may not be able to identify the exact species of
      azalea at this time of year, but in your area in the
      wild there are just a few: the short, stoloniferous
      coast azalea, the tall pink hoary azalea, the late
      blooming white swamp azalea and perhaps some
      pinxterflower azalea in drier upland woods.

      The same collection, cleaning and planting guidelines
      apply for evergreen azaleas, but the pods are much
      smaller. You really have to hunt for them. A lot of
      evergreen azaleas do not form seed pods.

      If you need more information or photos of anything
      discussed here, just contact me directly.

      Mike Creel, Lexington, South Carolina

      --- FAMKNOWLES@aol. com wrote:

      > this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a
      > CC
      >
      > Seed Collection:
      >
      > Can you send me tips for collecting seeds from
      > Azaleas in the wild?
      > I am looking at wild azaleas that a local nursery
      > man calls "pinky pink" which are growing along
      > growing along the roadside. (R.candense ? maybe?)
      > Can you tell me when the seeds form and mature?
      > What the seeds/pods look like? How long for
      > germination and sprouting? When and how to plant?
      > Also can I collect seeds from my non native
      > azaleas?
      >
      > I live in coastal Georgia; zone 8 on the maps. In
      > reality, this is the cusp of zones 8 and 9. This
      > area is a combination of marshy wetland and (rapidly
      > disappearing to the bulldozer and developer) dry
      > hardwood or pine forests
      >
      > Thank you, D. Knowles
      >
      >
      ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
      > Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of
      > free safety and security tools, free access to
      > millions of high-quality videos from across the web,
      > free AOL Mail and more.
      >

    • Donald Hyatt
      Hi Will, If kept fairly cool and dry, seeds will last quite a few years without refrigeration. Freezing seed after it has dried will make it last a very long
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 5, 2006
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        Hi Will,
        If kept fairly cool and dry, seeds will last quite a few years without refrigeration.  Freezing seed after it has dried will make it last a very long time, but I have planted three year old seed that came up just fine and it was never even refrigerated. It had been in the basement which never gets above 70 degrees. Seed does lose its viability over time, but if you plant your seed next spring or even the year after without refrigerating it, I bet you'll end up with more seedlings than you can handle anyway. 
         
        I germinate my seeds under fluorescent lights in the back of the basement.  Works great and keeps the mess out of the living room.  Germinating seeds is one thing, but transplanting and growing them on is yet another.  I find if I start my seeds early in the winter, I can at least have some manageable plants to deal with by spring and I get at least an extra year of growth before fall.  If you wait until spring, plants won't be as large so they'll need protection in colder climates.  You might try sowing them like Mike Creel does, outside in pots situated under some larger plants with screen over the containers to provide protection from heavy rains and to keep critters from digging in the dirt. 
         
        I have some info on on the web about my approach to raising rhodos and azaleas from seed.  It is linked from the following page:
         
        Good luck,
         
        Don Hyatt
        McLean, VA
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006 1:52 PM
        Subject: Re: [AZ] seed collection

        If you are storing the seeds until the spring because your wife will not let you use the bay window again, is it necessary to store them in the refrigerater? 
         
        Will
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006 10:47 AM
        Subject: Re: [AZ] seed collection

        It appears that no one in the azalea group has
        responded to your e-mail or they may have answered you
        separately. In any case I will give you some pointers
        since I have been out this week collecting azalea seed
        pods and cleaning the seeds, to send to seed exchanges
        in the American Rhododendron Society and Azalea
        Society of America.

        The pinky-pink azalea in your coastal Georgia area is
        probably Rhododendron canescens, the hoary azalea,
        which blooms early with no leaves and often grows
        tall, with no running roots.

        Native azalea seed pods resemble small brown banana in
        clusters at upper branch joints and stem ends. Seed
        pods are multi-chambered and split open from the end
        resembling claws. At this time of year most of the
        early and mid-season species will already have spilled
        most of their seeds, BUT you can find seed pods that
        are just half or two-thirds opened (as I did this
        week). If you are careful you CAN collect seeds from
        such pods. More seeds stay in the pod on a wet day
        than dry day. I use coin envelopes to envelop the
        pods before I break them off.

        Keep collected seed pods in a paper (not plastic)
        envelope for a few days inside to dry before cleaning
        seeds. It creates cleaner seeds when you just split
        the splitting seed pods along chamber lines using a
        dull knife edge and let seeds spill out, onto a
        creased sheet of white paper. I use needle nosed
        pliers to spread the splitting pod. Then I work the
        material through a couple of tea strainers to remove
        the larger pod pieces and trash.

        Store the seeds in paper envelopes in your fridge
        until planting. You can plant and grow azalea seeds
        indoors (planted this month) in a clear box half
        filled with long-fiber sphagnum moss, kept under
        fluorescent lights or you can plant them outdoors in
        pots (half full of fast-draining pine bark soil
        conditioner) protected with a cap of 1/4 inch mesh
        hardware cloth, which is what I do. Seeds are quite
        small and elongate.

        Planted indoors on long fiber sphagnum, azalea seeds
        will germinate in just a couple of weeks. Seeds are
        just sprinkled on the surface of the media, not under
        it. Planted in winter in outdoor pots, the seeds may
        not germinate until spring, which is not a problem.

        You may not be able to identify the exact species of
        azalea at this time of year, but in your area in the
        wild there are just a few: the short, stoloniferous
        coast azalea, the tall pink hoary azalea, the late
        blooming white swamp azalea and perhaps some
        pinxterflower azalea in drier upland woods.

        The same collection, cleaning and planting guidelines
        apply for evergreen azaleas, but the pods are much
        smaller. You really have to hunt for them. A lot of
        evergreen azaleas do not form seed pods.

        If you need more information or photos of anything
        discussed here, just contact me directly.

        Mike Creel, Lexington, South Carolina

        --- FAMKNOWLES@aol. com wrote:

        > this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a
        > CC
        >
        > Seed Collection:
        >
        > Can you send me tips for collecting seeds from
        > Azaleas in the wild?
        > I am looking at wild azaleas that a local nursery
        > man calls "pinky pink" which are growing along
        > growing along the roadside. (R.candense ? maybe?)
        > Can you tell me when the seeds form and mature?
        > What the seeds/pods look like? How long for
        > germination and sprouting? When and how to plant?
        > Also can I collect seeds from my non native
        > azaleas?
        >
        > I live in coastal Georgia; zone 8 on the maps. In
        > reality, this is the cusp of zones 8 and 9. This
        > area is a combination of marshy wetland and (rapidly
        > disappearing to the bulldozer and developer) dry
        > hardwood or pine forests
        >
        > Thank you, D. Knowles
        >
        >
        ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
        > Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of
        > free safety and security tools, free access to
        > millions of high-quality videos from across the web,
        > free AOL Mail and more.
        >

      • Will and Kate Ferrell
        Thanks Don. --Will ... From: Donald Hyatt To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006 5:01 PM Subject: Re: [AZ] seed collection Hi Will, If
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 5, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks Don.  --Will
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006 5:01 PM
          Subject: Re: [AZ] seed collection

          Hi Will,
          If kept fairly cool and dry, seeds will last quite a few years without refrigeration.  Freezing seed after it has dried will make it last a very long time, but I have planted three year old seed that came up just fine and it was never even refrigerated. It had been in the basement which never gets above 70 degrees. Seed does lose its viability over time, but if you plant your seed next spring or even the year after without refrigerating it, I bet you'll end up with more seedlings than you can handle anyway. 
           
          I germinate my seeds under fluorescent lights in the back of the basement.  Works great and keeps the mess out of the living room.  Germinating seeds is one thing, but transplanting and growing them on is yet another.  I find if I start my seeds early in the winter, I can at least have some manageable plants to deal with by spring and I get at least an extra year of growth before fall.  If you wait until spring, plants won't be as large so they'll need protection in colder climates.  You might try sowing them like Mike Creel does, outside in pots situated under some larger plants with screen over the containers to provide protection from heavy rains and to keep critters from digging in the dirt. 
           
          I have some info on on the web about my approach to raising rhodos and azaleas from seed.  It is linked from the following page:
           
          Good luck,
           
          Don Hyatt
          McLean, VA
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006 1:52 PM
          Subject: Re: [AZ] seed collection

          If you are storing the seeds until the spring because your wife will not let you use the bay window again, is it necessary to store them in the refrigerater? 
           
          Will
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006 10:47 AM
          Subject: Re: [AZ] seed collection

          It appears that no one in the azalea group has
          responded to your e-mail or they may have answered you
          separately. In any case I will give you some pointers
          since I have been out this week collecting azalea seed
          pods and cleaning the seeds, to send to seed exchanges
          in the American Rhododendron Society and Azalea
          Society of America.

          The pinky-pink azalea in your coastal Georgia area is
          probably Rhododendron canescens, the hoary azalea,
          which blooms early with no leaves and often grows
          tall, with no running roots.

          Native azalea seed pods resemble small brown banana in
          clusters at upper branch joints and stem ends. Seed
          pods are multi-chambered and split open from the end
          resembling claws. At this time of year most of the
          early and mid-season species will already have spilled
          most of their seeds, BUT you can find seed pods that
          are just half or two-thirds opened (as I did this
          week). If you are careful you CAN collect seeds from
          such pods. More seeds stay in the pod on a wet day
          than dry day. I use coin envelopes to envelop the
          pods before I break them off.

          Keep collected seed pods in a paper (not plastic)
          envelope for a few days inside to dry before cleaning
          seeds. It creates cleaner seeds when you just split
          the splitting seed pods along chamber lines using a
          dull knife edge and let seeds spill out, onto a
          creased sheet of white paper. I use needle nosed
          pliers to spread the splitting pod. Then I work the
          material through a couple of tea strainers to remove
          the larger pod pieces and trash.

          Store the seeds in paper envelopes in your fridge
          until planting. You can plant and grow azalea seeds
          indoors (planted this month) in a clear box half
          filled with long-fiber sphagnum moss, kept under
          fluorescent lights or you can plant them outdoors in
          pots (half full of fast-draining pine bark soil
          conditioner) protected with a cap of 1/4 inch mesh
          hardware cloth, which is what I do. Seeds are quite
          small and elongate.

          Planted indoors on long fiber sphagnum, azalea seeds
          will germinate in just a couple of weeks. Seeds are
          just sprinkled on the surface of the media, not under
          it. Planted in winter in outdoor pots, the seeds may
          not germinate until spring, which is not a problem.

          You may not be able to identify the exact species of
          azalea at this time of year, but in your area in the
          wild there are just a few: the short, stoloniferous
          coast azalea, the tall pink hoary azalea, the late
          blooming white swamp azalea and perhaps some
          pinxterflower azalea in drier upland woods.

          The same collection, cleaning and planting guidelines
          apply for evergreen azaleas, but the pods are much
          smaller. You really have to hunt for them. A lot of
          evergreen azaleas do not form seed pods.

          If you need more information or photos of anything
          discussed here, just contact me directly.

          Mike Creel, Lexington, South Carolina

          --- FAMKNOWLES@aol. com wrote:

          > this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a
          > CC
          >
          > Seed Collection:
          >
          > Can you send me tips for collecting seeds from
          > Azaleas in the wild?
          > I am looking at wild azaleas that a local nursery
          > man calls "pinky pink" which are growing along
          > growing along the roadside. (R.candense ? maybe?)
          > Can you tell me when the seeds form and mature?
          > What the seeds/pods look like? How long for
          > germination and sprouting? When and how to plant?
          > Also can I collect seeds from my non native
          > azaleas?
          >
          > I live in coastal Georgia; zone 8 on the maps. In
          > reality, this is the cusp of zones 8 and 9. This
          > area is a combination of marshy wetland and (rapidly
          > disappearing to the bulldozer and developer) dry
          > hardwood or pine forests
          >
          > Thank you, D. Knowles
          >
          >
          ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
          > Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of
          > free safety and security tools, free access to
          > millions of high-quality videos from across the web,
          > free AOL Mail and more.
          >

        • Mike Creel
          Azalea seed pods vary in length and diameter, at the longest about 2.5 inches in the large-flowered deciduous hybrids and 0.25 inches in diameter. Exbury
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 7, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Azalea seed pods vary in length and diameter, at the
            longest about 2.5 inches in the large-flowered
            deciduous hybrids and 0.25 inches in diameter. Exbury
            azaleas and hybrids with Exbury breeding always create
            large seed pods.

            The smallest pods would be in the evergreen azaleas as
            short as a half inch in length with a diameter of 1/8
            inch. Most true azalea species are self infertile and
            cannot pollinate themselves flower to flower on the
            same plant, BUT must outcross with other azaleas that
            are not clones of itself. MANY evergreen azala
            plantings today are clones of the exact same plant
            from cuttings and as such would not create seeds.

            A hedge of pure SNOW kurume azaleas would generate no
            seed pods, BUT if you plant some GLACIER azaleas
            nearby, seed pods could develop on either plant,
            particularly the GLACIER. I have a pot of
            Glacier/Snow seedlings growing now. I can send seed
            pod photos if you need them.

            Mike Creel
            --- famknowles@... wrote:

            > Thanks again,
            > I "mis- spoke". What I really meant to ask was
            > what size are the seed pods?
            > Dianne Knowles
            >
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: mikeacreel@...
            > To: famknowles@...
            > Sent: Wed, 6 Dec 2006 11:39 PM
            > Subject: Re: [AZ] seed collection
            >
            >
            > Azalea seeds are tiny, resembling elongate pieces of
            > bark. You can see and sort them with your eyes. I
            > can
            > send you a photo of seeds much enlarged taken
            > through
            > a microscope. Usually golden brown.
            > Mike Creel
            > --- famknowles@... wrote:
            >
            > > Dear Mr. Creel,
            > > Thank you for your wonderfully detailed e
            > mail.
            > > I look forward to finding and growing azalea
            > seeds.
            > > How big are the wild azalea seeds. For example R.
            > > canescens?
            > > Thanks,
            > > Dianne Knowles
            > >
            > >
            > > -----Original Message-----
            > > From: mikeacreel@...
            > > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com; FAMKNOWLES@...
            > > Sent: Tue, 5 Dec 2006 10:47 AM
            > > Subject: Re: [AZ] seed collection
            > >
            > >
            > > It appears that no one in the azalea group has
            > > responded to your e-mail or they may have answered
            > > you
            > > separately. In any case I will give you some
            > > pointers
            > > since I have been out this week collecting azalea
            > > seed
            > > pods and cleaning the seeds, to send to seed
            > > exchanges
            > > in the American Rhododendron Society and Azalea
            > > Society of America.
            > >
            > > The pinky-pink azalea in your coastal Georgia area
            > > is
            > > probably Rhododendron canescens, the hoary azalea,
            > > which blooms early with no leaves and often grows
            > > tall, with no running roots.
            > >
            > > Native azalea seed pods resemble small brown
            > banana
            > > in
            > > clusters at upper branch joints and stem ends.
            > Seed
            > > pods are multi-chambered and split open from the
            > end
            > > resembling claws. At this time of year most of the
            > > early and mid-season species will already have
            > > spilled
            > > most of their seeds, BUT you can find seed pods
            > that
            > > are just half or two-thirds opened (as I did this
            > > week). If you are careful you CAN collect seeds
            > > from
            > > such pods. More seeds stay in the pod on a wet
            > day
            > > than dry day. I use coin envelopes to envelop the
            > > pods before I break them off.
            > >
            > > Keep collected seed pods in a paper (not plastic)
            > > envelope for a few days inside to dry before
            > > cleaning
            > > seeds. It creates cleaner seeds when you just
            > split
            > > the splitting seed pods along chamber lines using
            > a
            > > dull knife edge and let seeds spill out, onto a
            > > creased sheet of white paper. I use needle nosed
            > > pliers to spread the splitting pod. Then I work
            > the
            > > material through a couple of tea strainers to
            > remove
            > > the larger pod pieces and trash.
            > >
            > > Store the seeds in paper envelopes in your fridge
            > > until planting. You can plant and grow azalea
            > seeds
            > > indoors (planted this month) in a clear box half
            > > filled with long-fiber sphagnum moss, kept under
            > > fluorescent lights or you can plant them outdoors
            > in
            > > pots (half full of fast-draining pine bark soil
            > > conditioner) protected with a cap of 1/4 inch mesh
            > > hardware cloth, which is what I do. Seeds are
            > quite
            > > small and elongate.
            > >
            > > Planted indoors on long fiber sphagnum, azalea
            > seeds
            > > will germinate in just a couple of weeks. Seeds
            > are
            > > just sprinkled on the surface of the media, not
            > > under
            > > it. Planted in winter in outdoor pots, the seeds
            > > may
            > > not germinate until spring, which is not a
            > problem.
            > >
            > > You may not be able to identify the exact species
            > of
            > > azalea at this time of year, but in your area in
            > the
            > > wild there are just a few: the short,
            > stoloniferous
            > > coast azalea, the tall pink hoary azalea, the late
            > > blooming white swamp azalea and perhaps some
            > > pinxterflower azalea in drier upland woods.
            > >
            > > The same collection, cleaning and planting
            > > guidelines
            > > apply for evergreen azaleas, but the pods are much
            > > smaller. You really have to hunt for them. A lot
            > > of
            > > evergreen azaleas do not form seed pods.
            > >
            > > If you need more information or photos of anything
            > > discussed here, just contact me directly.
            > >
            > > Mike Creel, Lexington, South Carolina
            > >
            > >
            > > --- FAMKNOWLES@... wrote:
            > >
            > > > this is from the ASK US page, so please send me
            > a
            > > > CC
            > > >
            > > > Seed Collection:
            > > >
            > > > Can you send me tips for collecting seeds
            > from
            > > > Azaleas in the wild?
            > > > I am looking at wild azaleas that a local
            > nursery
            > > > man calls "pinky pink" which are growing along
            > > > growing along the roadside. (R.candense ?
            > maybe?)
            > > > Can you tell me when the seeds form and mature?
            >
            > > > What the seeds/pods look like? How long for
            > > > germination and sprouting? When and how to
            > plant?
            > > > Also can I collect seeds from my non native
            > > > azaleas?
            > > >
            > > > I live in coastal Georgia; zone 8 on the maps.
            > In
            > > > reality, this is the cusp of zones 8 and 9.
            > This
            > > > area is a combination of marshy wetland and
            > > (rapidly
            > > > disappearing to the bulldozer and developer) dry
            > > > hardwood or pine forests
            > > >
            > > > Thank you, D. Knowles
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
            ________________________________________________________________________
            > > > Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set
            > of
            > > > free safety and security tools, free access to
            > > > millions of high-quality videos from across the
            > > web,
            > > > free AOL Mail and more.
            > > >
            > >
            >
            ________________________________________________________________________
            > > Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of
            > > free safety and security tools, free access to
            > > millions of high-quality videos from across the
            > web,
            > > free AOL Mail and more.
            > >
            >
            ________________________________________________________________________
            > Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of
            > free safety and security tools, free access to
            > millions of high-quality videos from across the web,
            > free AOL Mail and more.
            >
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