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Re: [AZ] June bloomers

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  • Robert Z. Callaham
    Bob Stelloh, Depending on your location and the seasonal progression in any given year, many satsukis bloom in June. Cultivars flowering in mid June would be
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 11, 2006
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      Bob Stelloh,

      Depending on your location and the seasonal progression in any given
      year, many satsukis bloom in June. Cultivars flowering in mid June
      would be considered "late bloomers" to satsuki fanciers in the San
      Francisco Bay Area and very late bloomers in the hot Great Valley of
      California. In my new book on satsuki azaleas, published by Stone
      Lantern (800) 776-1167, see Appendix B. Reported Dates of Blooming of
      547 Cultivars.

      If you want names of a dozen or more late to very late bloomers, just
      ask.

      Bob Callaham
      Orinda, CA
      On Nov 11, 2006, at 3:25 PM, Bob Stelloh wrote:

      > At 4:48 PM -0500 on 11/11/06, jbarnes wrote
      > <snip>
      > It would significantly increase interest if I could give some
      > examples of azaleas (or Rhodys) which would be in bloom during the
      > festival in mid June. Most of my plants are done blooming by then,
      > but I thought I would ask the group for any suggestions they might
      > have.
      >
      > John,
      >
      > Some deciduous that bloom for me around mid-June are
      >
      > arborescens
      > Dawn's Chorus
      > some Gregory Bald native hybrids
      > July Joy
      > Weston's Parade
      > Ribbon Candy
      > viscosum
      >
      > and R. maximum can bloom that early sometimes.
      >
      > Tediously, you could look at each of the deciduous images we have at
      > http://www.pbase.com/azaleasociety - most of the full-size pictures
      > include the date and location where it was taken, precisely so you
      > can see when that plant bloomed where .
      >
      > And a lot of satsuki evergreens bloom around mid-June.
      >
      > Regards,
      > Bob Stelloh Hendersonville NC USDA Zone 7
      >
      >
    • jbarnes
      Bob, Unfortunately the photos of Aromis seem to be sans dates so I have no idea about bloom times. June is a lot warmer here in June than Hendersonville, so I
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 13, 2006
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        Bob,

        Unfortunately the  photos of Aromis seem to be sans dates so I have no idea about bloom times.

        June is a lot warmer here in June than Hendersonville, so I have problems with Arborescens.  I have some from  Greg Bald that do quite well and others that do very poorly, and no way to predict which is which.   I am going to test some Westons.
        Thanks for t he advice.
        On Nov 11, 2006, at 6:25 PM, Bob Stelloh wrote:

        At 4:48 PM -0500 on 11/11/06, jbarnes wrote
        <snip>
        It would significantly increase interest if I could give some
        examples of azaleas (or Rhodys) which would be in bloom during the
        festival in mid June. Most of my plants are done blooming by then,
        but I thought I would ask the group for any suggestions they might
        have.

        John,

        Some deciduous that bloom for me around mid-June are

        arborescens
        Dawn's Chorus
        some Gregory Bald native hybrids
        July Joy
        Weston's Parade
        Ribbon Candy
        viscosum

        and R. maximum can bloom that early sometimes.

        Tediously, you could look at each of the deciduous images we have at

        http://www.pbase.com/azaleasociety - most of the full-size pictures
        include the date and location where it was taken, precisely so you
        can see when that plant bloomed where .

        And a lot of satsuki evergreens bloom around mid-June.

        Regards,
        Bob Stelloh Hendersonville NC USDA Zone 7

      • Mike Creel
        John, Are you certain that Greenwood is Zone 7B? Here west of Columbia in rural Lexington County we are Zone 8A, but since my site is sandills I can growth
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 13, 2006
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          John, Are you certain that Greenwood is Zone 7B? Here
          west of Columbia in rural Lexington County we are Zone
          8A, but since my site is sandills I can growth azalea
          species of the coastal plain, piedmont and mountains
          well. What is the planting site like soil-wise,
          drainage, slope and moisture? What size plants do you
          need and by when? Usually I only have small plants,
          rarely anything in landscape ready proportions.
          Eastmanii blooms in mid-May in Greenwood County almost
          in town along Curltail Creek.

          To attain mid-June flowering in natives you are
          limited to early forms of prunifolium, late forms of
          arborescens, late viscosum, serrulatum, hybrids of
          prunifolium with arborescens. I grow a form of
          prunifolium named Early Prune, that roots easily even
          now and a late arborescens named Judd's Arb. I think
          I have seedlings of a cross of these two. I have a
          few rooted cuttings of Camps Red, maybe 6 inches tall,
          2 years old.

          I have had no real problems in growing any of the
          Weston azaelas here. I don't fertilize anything
          though, as I believe it weakens the plant. Larger
          cuttings of azaleas can be rooted to create what looks
          like a 3-4 year old plant. How about the azaleas
          Summer Lyric and George Beasley from Transplant
          Nursery. If I were you I would seek the advice of
          Jeff Beasley at Transplant in Lavonia, GA. They have
          the plants and the knowledge.

          Mike Creel
          Lexington, SC

          --- jbarnes <jbarnes@...> wrote:

          > Lander University here in Greenwood SC(zone 7b) is
          > in the process of
          > turning its campus into an arboretum stressing
          > native plants. Park
          > Seed is a major factor here in the larger community
          > ad is the
          > sparkplug behind a Flower festival in mid June
          > which is a pretty big
          > deal (by local standards). I am trying to interest
          > the arboretum
          > committee to use some azaleas, especially natives
          > and Aromi hybrids.
          > It would significantly increase interest if I could
          > give some
          > examples of azaleas (or Rhodys) which would be in
          > bloom during the
          > festival in mid June. Most of my plants are done
          > blooming by then,
          > but I thought I would ask the group for any
          > suggestions they might
          > have. I have wondered if anything with prunifolium
          > in the gene pool
          > might work.
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > John Barnes
          >





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        • jbarnes
          Mike the USDA Hardiness map for SC shows the line between 7b and 8a pretty close to I- 20, which puts me about 50-70 miles north of 8a. The soil here is red
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 14, 2006
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            Mike the USDA Hardiness map for SC shows the  line between 7b and  8a pretty close to I- 20, which puts me about 50-70 miles north of 8a.

            The soil here is red clay but not as heavy as   it is north of  us  in the foothills.  Lander will prep the area to profide whatever drainage and amendments are needed, and I expect it  will be irrigated

            I've been working with Jeff  and Lisa Beasley for 20 years  but don't see  many June bloomers in the  curtailed line they now offer.
            I will ask their advice and I am going to try some Westons.

            I would be very interested in Early Prune, Judd's  Arb., and Camps red.  If you could spare a rooted cutting or I would be glad to drive  over and pick them  up.

            Some  Aromis are doing very well for  me, and I have hopes to get Lander to se some of them because of  their general robust character.  I think that mght get enough  notice to  influence the nursury industry hereabouts. But   The ideal blooming time would have  to be compromised, I think.

            John Barnes
            On Nov 13, 2006, at 9:30 PM, Mike Creel wrote:

            John, Are you certain that Greenwood is Zone 7B? Here
            west of Columbia in rural Lexington County we are Zone
            8A, but since my site is sandills I can growth azalea
            species of the coastal plain, piedmont and mountains
            well. What is the planting site like soil-wise,
            drainage, slope and moisture? What size plants do you
            need and by when? Usually I only have small plants,
            rarely anything in landscape ready proportions.
            Eastmanii blooms in mid-May in Greenwood County almost
            in town along Curltail Creek.

            To attain mid-June flowering in natives you are
            limited to early forms of prunifolium, late forms of
            arborescens, late viscosum, serrulatum, hybrids of
            prunifolium with arborescens. I grow a form of
            prunifolium named Early Prune, that roots easily even
            now and a late arborescens named Judd's Arb. I think
            I have seedlings of a cross of these two. I have a
            few rooted cuttings of Camps Red, maybe 6 inches tall,
            2 years old.

            I have had no real problems in growing any of the
            Weston azaelas here. I don't fertilize anything
            though, as I believe it weakens the plant. Larger
            cuttings of azaleas can be rooted to create what looks
            like a 3-4 year old plant. How about the azaleas
            Summer Lyric and George Beasley from Transplant
            Nursery. If I were you I would seek the advice of
            Jeff Beasley at Transplant in Lavonia, GA. They have
            the plants and the knowledge.

            Mike Creel
            Lexington, SC

            --- jbarnes <

            jbarnes@wesleycommons.org> wrote:

            > Land
            .
            Web Bug from http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=11205563/grpspId=1707632670/msgId=6570/stime=1163475156/nc1=3848644/nc2=3848530/nc3=3 

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