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Re: [AZ] propagation - Description of azalea seed pods

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  • Joe Schild
    Bill & Barbara, Given the southernmost range of R. periclymenoides is somewhere about halfway between Birmingham and Mobile, AL, I would put my bet on the pink
    Message 1 of 42 , Jun 3, 2004
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      Bill & Barbara,
      Given the southernmost range of R. periclymenoides is somewhere about
      halfway between Birmingham and Mobile, AL, I would put my bet on the pink
      azaleas being R. canescens. They are abundant along the Gulf Costal regions,
      in Mobile and northward even to Tennessee.

      As for winged seed, all of the native azaleas are winged except
      R. arborescens, and they are small pelet like. Having wings does not mean
      they will fly very far from the host plant when the pods split. More often,
      seed pods are carried by rodents like mice, chip monks, and squirrels. I
      have seen cashes of seed pods and acorns where a rodent has stashed them for
      food, usually at the base of a tree or tree stump. The stump provides the
      critter with a lookout post. If there is moss growing beneath an azalea,
      then the chance of seed sprouting and small plants thriving is enhanced. I
      have seen hundreds or perhaps thousands of seedlings growing in moss under
      large rhododendron and Flame Azaleas on Roane Mountain. In the NCCG, there
      are fallen, rotted trees that have become nurse logs and seedlings grow in
      the old tree log.

      There are several factors governing if seed will be set by an azalea. Too
      much rainfall during the flowering season will prevent pollination and no
      seed set. That happened last year in our area. The native azaleas on Wayah
      Bald, NC, and in Tennessee, set very few seed, but did set flower buds
      profusly for this year's bloom. Too dry a season will stress the plant and
      there will usually be fewer seed and flower buds. Azaleas in a tame
      landscape, like your yard, usually get sufficient water, nutrients and other
      care to set a few to lots of seed. From a landscape viewpoint, I do not
      want a lot of seed, for that means fewer flower buds. That is the reason we
      will deadhead our rhododendron and a some of the deciduous azaleas, though
      picking off thousands of seed pods from my very large R. austrinum is not a
      task I will take on. When the pods start to splt, I put sheets of newspaper
      under the plant and shake it, and then give the seed to anyone who wants
      them.

      Joe Schild Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "William C. Miller III" <bill@...>
      To: <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, June 03, 2004 7:03 PM
      Subject: Re: [AZ] propagation - Description of azalea seed pods


      > Barbara,
      >
      > If we narrowed your "pink native azaleas" down to canescens and
      > periclymenoides, given your location, I would likely go with the former.
      >
      > When one says that a plant will not self pollinate, there are several
      > possible meanings. It may mean that due to some incompatibility at the
      > molecular level that self pollination will not occur. Or, it may mean
      > that the pistil is not "receptive" when its own pollen is generally
      > available.
      >
      > Also, please understand, that there are at least three ways to get
      > seed. There is "self pollination" where pollination takes place with
      > pollen from the same flower. There is "close pollination" where the
      > pollen comes from another flower on the same plant. And finally there
      > is "cross pollination" where the pollen comes from a different plant.
      > Actually, in theory there is a fourth way.... apomixis... or the
      > production of seeds without the benefit of pollen.
      >
      > Not all plants in group and not all flowers on a plant run on the same
      > schedule. Even if we rule out self pollination as not possible for some
      > reason, there is no reason to conclude that close or cross pollination
      > could not take place. The pollinators (often bumble bees) go from
      > flower to flower picking up and delivering pollen every time they visit
      > a flower.
      >
      > The seeds are pretty small and as Mike pointed out, they are often
      > "winged." (I don't know if all American native seed are winged ) Given
      > your coastal environment, I bet you could get a pretty good wind borne
      > distribution of seed. That could account for patches of plants here and
      > there.
      >
      > Bill Miller
      > Bethesda, Maryland
      >
    • DELORIS SMITH
      Could I please get some of the seeds. Deloris Smith 7935 Bethel Road Gainesville, GA 30506 ... From: Don Hyatt To:
      Message 42 of 42 , Nov 9, 2004
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        Could I please get some of the seeds.
        Deloris Smith
        7935 Bethel Road
        Gainesville, GA 30506
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Don Hyatt" <don@...>
        To: <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, November 09, 2004 9:21 AM
        Subject: Re: [AZ] Will send you azalea seed pods


        >
        > Mike,
        > I got your seed shipment yesterday. Wow!! What a selection! Thanks so
        much.
        > Our chapter members will be really excited to get these crosses. That
        > December
        > newsletter is going to be a long one.
        >
        > When plants like Galle's Choice Cream set pods on every flower, they
        > usually are an
        > F2. With that primary hybrid, we should get everything from atlanticum
        > to austrinum
        > and all variations in between. I suspect every seedling will be
        > strongly fragrant too.
        >
        > Thanks again,
        >
        > Don
        >
        > Mike Creel wrote:
        >
        > >I will send you a cluster of native azalea seed pods
        > >just as soon as they are ready for picking, probably
        > >from my Choice Cream, a hybrid of atlanticum with
        > >austrinum by the late Fred Galle. The low dense plant
        > >has the heaviest seed set of any azalea I grow -
        > >resulting in 8 or more pods from a single truss - but
        > >there is no nearby azalea for it to cross with. It
        > >must be selfing or pollen from other early azaleas is
        > >travelling 100 feet or so via bumble bee.
        > >
        > >I made a long list of unique azalea crosses this
        > >season - some worked very well, others not so well and
        > >some not at all apparently. Some red and orange
        > >flammeums are forming nice pods as are Keowee Sunset,
        > >a cross of calendulaceum with periclymenoides, and two
        > >nearby flammeums of mine - Denmark Bluffs red and
        > >Brick Ruffles orange-yellow. I am assuming that
        > >Keowee Sunset and the two flammeums are exchanging
        > >pollen.
        > >Mike Creel, South Carolina
        > >--- iffy123 <iffy123@...> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >>You fellas are keeping me hopping!!!! I'd love to
        > >>see mature seeds or seed
        > >>pot. My mailing address is
        > >>Barbara O'Meallie
        > >>P O Box 5, Pass
        > >>Christian MS 39571-0005.
        > >>
        > >>Thanks
        > >>Barbra O'M
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
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