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Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

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  • William C. Miller III
    Ann, Betty Anne Voss is a nice pink double... which means the stamen are transformed into petals...looks sort of like a rose in that it has lots of petals
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 7, 2006
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      Ann,

      'Betty Anne Voss' is a nice pink double... which means the stamen are transformed into petals...looks sort of like a rose in that it has lots of petals and no stamen.

      A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other.  Conventional wisdom holds that the calyx transforms into a second corolla to give you the hose-in-hose condition.... but it gets confusing when you have a hose-in-hose flower that has a calyx.

      Experts are very useful.  However, listening to experts should only be carried so far.  Twelve independent experts could give you twelve different recommendations.  To the point, 'Delaware Valley White' would not be one of my recommendations.  It is a perfectly fine azalea, but (in my opinion) there are so many other/better/newer options for someone interested in a white azalea.  You already know about 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing'.  I like 'Palestrina', 'Seattle White', 'Georgia Giant', 'Hakatashiro', 'Patrick William', 'Niagara', 'Treasure', 'Sheila' ..... and the list would get longer if I thought about it a little more.  But, my point is that there isn't one right answer to selecting an azalea once you get past whether or not it is suitable (hardy enough) for your specific environment. 

      The current definitive text on azaleas is AZALEAS by Fred Galle.  It's about a $70 book from Timber Press, but you can get it for less on the Internet, it sometimes turns up at used book stores, or you can check it out of the library.  The Azalea Society has a lot of images of azaleas on their Web site., and another resource that you might look at is Google.  You can do an image search on an azalea cultivar name and occasionally there are pretty good pictures.

      Get lots of expert recommendations but do a little homework before you spend any money.

      Bill Miller
      Bethesda, Maryland
      www.theazaleaworks.com

      Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC wrote:

      Hi Bill,

       

      I neglected to include my location in my e-mail, but you surmised correctly as I am in Hampton , Virginia which is on the coast.  Thank you for the informative e-mail.  I love ‘Betty Ann Voss’ which I believe is a hose-in-hose flower, so the ‘H. H. Hume’ sounds lovely.  I was intrigued when I saw experienced azalea lovers/growers recommend a certain cultivar – to whom better to listen than the experienced?

       

      Azaleas do grow very well in my area, in fact, across the Chesapeake Bay in Norfolk , VA an Azalea Festival is held each year.

       

      Thanks again,

       

      Ann

       

      Ann M. Sawyer

      AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care

      (757) 722-9961 x 3634 


      From: azaleas@yahoogroups .com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups .com ] On Behalf Of William C. Miller III
      Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 3:00 PM
      To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
      Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

       

      Hi Ann,

      Regarding item #1 -  If you are really interested in a small, white,  hose-in-hose flower, perhaps 'H. H. Hume' might be a consideration.  It is derived from 'Snow'.  I share Dave Nanney's opinion regarding 'Snow'.  I don't recommend 'Snow' for anyone.   Please note that I enclose cultivar names in single quotes.  That's the proper convention.

      Regarding item #2 -  It's not widely known but 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing' and 'George L. Taber' are related.  They are different versions of the same plant.  Given enough time, your white 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing' will produce a few 'George L. Taber' flowers.... and your 'George L. Taber' will produce a few white flowers.

      I've forgotten where you are from.  Your 757 area code suggest eastern Virginia ?  In any case, there are many thousands of azaleas and you would have little problem growing them in your area.

      Bill Miller
      Bethesda , Maryland
      www.theazaleaworks. com

      Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC wrote:

      Hi all,

       

      I’m hoping to track down two azaleas. 

       

      1. Recently, people in this group have been discussing an azalea that is similar to “Snow” but is superior and more desirable.  I would love to know the name of this so I can acquire some.

       

      2.  I have some of the larger azaleas – Formosa , Mrs. GG Gerbing, and  Henry Taber.  They are a deep pink, white, and pink & white, respectively.   I (think) I remember another large one that had medium intensity lavender flowers.  In recent years I have not seen this anywhere.  Does anyone know anything about this azalea?  Did I dream it up?

       

       

       

       

      Ann M. Sawyer

      AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care

      (757) 722-9961 x 3634 

       

    • Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC
      Bill, Thank you for your very informational response. It is really helpful to me - I realize that, although, I have loved azaleas for years, I don t know
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 7, 2006
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        Bill,

         

        Thank you for your very informational response.  It is really helpful to me – I realize that, although, I have loved azaleas for years, I don’t know nearly as much about them as I would like.  I will check on Galle ’s book – if I find it cost-prohibitive, even on e-Bay, I will make do with the web sites, at least for now. 

        I will be in zone 7 in about a year – right now I am in zone 8 (just barely).  I think I will be fortunate enough to be able to grow almost any azalea I want.  Up until now, I have grown only ‘Mrs. G.G. Gerbing’, ‘Formosa’, ‘Betty Ann Voss’, ‘Nancy’, one from the Encore series and some small Japanese ones – I don’t remember the name. I can see I will want to expand my collection!

        Thanks again,

         

        Ann

         

        Ann M. Sawyer

        AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care

        (757) 722-9961 x 3634 


        From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of William C. Miller III
        Sent: Monday, August 07, 2006 10:53 AM
        To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

         

        Ann,

        'Betty Anne Voss' is a nice pink double... which means the stamen are transformed into petals...looks sort of like a rose in that it has lots of petals and no stamen.

        A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other.  Conventional wisdom holds that the calyx transforms into a second corolla to give you the hose-in-hose condition.... but it gets confusing when you have a hose-in-hose flower that has a calyx.

        Experts are very useful.  However, listening to experts should only be carried so far.  Twelve independent experts could give you twelve different recommendations.  To the point, 'Delaware Valley White' would not be one of my recommendations.  It is a perfectly fine azalea, but (in my opinion) there are so many other/better/newer options for someone interested in a white azalea.  You already know about 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing'.  I like 'Palestrina', 'Seattle White', 'Georgia Giant', 'Hakatashiro', 'Patrick William', ' Niagara ', 'Treasure', 'Sheila' ..... and the list would get longer if I thought about it a little more.  But, my point is that there isn't one right answer to selecting an azalea once you get past whether or not it is suitable (hardy enough) for your specific environment. 

        The current definitive text on azaleas is AZALEAS by Fred Galle.  It's about a $70 book from Timber Press, but you can get it for less on the Internet, it sometimes turns up at used book stores, or you can check it out of the library.  The Azalea Society has a lot of images of azaleas on their Web site., and another resource that you might look at is Google.  You can do an image search on an azalea cultivar name and occasionally there are pretty good pictures.

        Get lots of expert recommendations but do a little homework before you spend any money.

        Bill Miller
        Bethesda , Maryland
        www.theazaleaworks.com

        Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC wrote:

        Hi Bill,

         

        I neglected to include my location in my e-mail, but you surmised correctly as I am in Hampton , Virginia which is on the coast.  Thank you for the informative e-mail.  I love ‘Betty Ann Voss’ which I believe is a hose-in-hose flower, so the ‘H. H. Hume’ sounds lovely.  I was intrigued when I saw experienced azalea lovers/growers recommend a certain cultivar – to whom better to listen than the experienced?

         

        Azaleas do grow very well in my area, in fact, across the Chesapeake Bay in Norfolk , VA an Azalea Festival is held each year.

         

        Thanks again,

         

        Ann

         

        Ann M. Sawyer

        AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care

        (757) 722-9961 x 3634 


        From: azaleas@yahoogroups .com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups .com ] On Behalf Of William C. Miller III
        Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 3:00 PM
        To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
        Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

         

        Hi Ann,

        Regarding item #1 -  If you are really interested in a small, white,  hose-in-hose flower, perhaps 'H. H. Hume' might be a consideration.  It is derived from 'Snow'.  I share Dave Nanney's opinion regarding 'Snow'.  I don't recommend 'Snow' for anyone.   Please note that I enclose cultivar names in single quotes.  That's the proper convention.

        Regarding item #2 -  It's not widely known but 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing' and 'George L. Taber' are related.  They are different versions of the same plant.  Given enough time, your white 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing' will produce a few 'George L. Taber' flowers.... and your 'George L. Taber' will produce a few white flowers.

        I've forgotten where you are from.  Your 757 area code suggest eastern Virginia ?  In any case, there are many thousands of azaleas and you would have little problem growing them in your area.

        Bill Miller
        Bethesda , Maryland
        www.theazaleaworks. com

        Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC wrote:


        Hi all,

         

        I’m hoping to track down two azaleas. 

         

        1. Recently, people in this group have been discussing an azalea that is similar to “Snow” but is superior and more desirable.  I would love to know the name of this so I can acquire some.

         

        2.  I have some of the larger azaleas – Formosa , Mrs. GG Gerbing, and  Henry Taber.  They are a deep pink, white, and pink & white, respectively.   I (think) I remember another large one that had medium intensity lavender flowers.  In recent years I have not seen this anywhere.  Does anyone know anything about this azalea?  Did I dream it up?

         

         

         

         

        Ann M. Sawyer

        AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care

        (757) 722-9961 x 3634 

         

      • William C. Miller III
        Ann, Two other books that you might be on the lookout for are: The Azalea Book, by Frederic P. Lee which was the definitive text before it got 30 years old
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 7, 2006
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          Ann,

          Two other books that you might be on the lookout for are:   The Azalea Book, by Frederic P. Lee which was the definitive text before it got 30 years old and was replaced by Galle's book in 1985.......and Great American Azaleas by Jim Darden...also published in 1985.

          Lee's book is excellent for getting that basic technical and historic perspective on azaleas.  That information is timeless and from a fundamentals point,  Lee's book  is excellent.  It just lacks thirty some years of new azalea introductions that have since come along.

          Darden's book has lots of photos.  It's a nice introduction to the hybrid groups.

          Now with the Galle book beginning to age, the only way to stay current is with periodicals like THE AZALEAN, the quarterly journal of the Azalea Society of America who incidentally sponsors this maillist.  I can't image anybody stepping forward to tackle updating Galle.

          Bill Miller
          Bethesda, Maryland
          www.theazaleaworks.com

          Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC wrote:

          Bill,

           

          Thank you for your very informational response.  It is really helpful to me – I realize that, although, I have loved azaleas for years, I don’t know nearly as much about them as I would like.  I will check on Galle ’s book – if I find it cost-prohibitive, even on e-Bay, I will make do with the web sites, at least for now. 

          I will be in zone 7 in about a year – right now I am in zone 8 (just barely).  I think I will be fortunate enough to be able to grow almost any azalea I want.  Up until now, I have grown only ‘Mrs. G.G. Gerbing’, ‘Formosa’, ‘Betty Ann Voss’, ‘Nancy’, one from the Encore series and some small Japanese ones – I don’t remember the name. I can see I will want to expand my collection!

          Thanks again,

           

          Ann

           

          Ann M. Sawyer

          AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care

          (757) 722-9961 x 3634 




        • Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC
          Thanks, Bill. THE AZALEAN sounds like a great publication. BTW, I found Galle s book on Amazon for about half price (used in VG condition) and ordered it.
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 7, 2006
          • 0 Attachment

            Thanks, Bill.  THE AZALEAN sounds like a great publication.  BTW, I found Galle ’s book on Amazon for about half price (used in VG condition) and ordered it.  Some fun bedtime reading on the way!!  I’ll keep my eye out for the other two.

             

            Ann

             

            Ann M. Sawyer

            AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care

            (757) 722-9961 x 3634 


            From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of William C. Miller III
            Sent: Monday, August 07, 2006 3:45 PM
            To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

             

            Ann,

            Two other books that you might be on the lookout for are:   The Azalea Book, by Frederic P. Lee which was the definitive text before it got 30 years old and was replaced by Galle's book in 1985.......and Great American Azaleas by Jim Darden...also published in 1985.

            Lee's book is excellent for getting that basic technical and historic perspective on azaleas.  That information is timeless and from a fundamentals point,  Lee's book  is excellent.  It just lacks thirty some years of new azalea introductions that have since come along.

            Darden's book has lots of photos.  It's a nice introduction to the hybrid groups.

            Now with the Galle book beginning to age, the only way to stay current is with periodicals like THE AZALEAN, the quarterly journal of the Azalea Society of America who incidentally sponsors this maillist.  I can't image anybody stepping forward to tackle updating Galle .

            Bill Miller
            Bethesda , Maryland
            www.theazaleaworks.com

            Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC wrote:

            Bill,

             

            Thank you for your very informational response.  It is really helpful to me – I realize that, although, I have loved azaleas for years, I don’t know nearly as much about them as I would like.  I will check on Galle ’s book – if I find it cost-prohibitive, even on e-Bay, I will make do with the web sites, at least for now. 

            I will be in zone 7 in about a year – right now I am in zone 8 (just barely).  I think I will be fortunate enough to be able to grow almost any azalea I want.  Up until now, I have grown only ‘Mrs. G.G. Gerbing’, ‘Formosa’, ‘Betty Ann Voss’, ‘Nancy’, one from the Encore series and some small Japanese ones – I don’t remember the name. I can see I will want to expand my collection!

            Thanks again,

             

            Ann

             

            Ann M. Sawyer

            AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care

            (757) 722-9961 x 3634 


             



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