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RE: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

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  • Mike Creel
    I grow a lot of whites (for hybridization purposes) here in the center of South. Good doers for me are HH Hume (very early and sporadically in late winter),
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 7 7:48 AM
      I grow a lot of whites (for hybridization purposes)
      here in the center of South. Good doers for me are HH
      Hume (very early and sporadically in late winter),
      Delaware Valley White, Sun Valley, and most recently
      Frostbery Yates. There is a common white azalea
      (whose name I temporarily forget) that blooms at the
      same time as Snow, but does not hold the dead flowers.
      It does well for me too.
      Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

      --- "Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC" <Ann.Sawyer2@...>
      wrote:

      > Mr. Ferrell,
      >
      >
      >
      > Yes, thanks, 'George L Tabor' is correct. I was
      > relying on my memory -
      > HA! I should know better by now. Thanks for the
      > advice on the azaleas.
      > I am very interested in the 'poukhanense' and am
      > going to look that up
      > right away. I plan also to pursue 'Delaware Valley
      > White'.
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks again,
      >
      >
      >
      > Ann
      >
      >
      >
      > Ann M. Sawyer
      >
      > AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care
      >
      > (757) 722-9961 x 3634
      >
      > ________________________________
      >
      > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      > Of Will and Kate Ferrell
      > Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 8:46 PM
      > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas
      >
      >
      >
      > Ms. Sawyer,
      >
      > I would recommend Delaware Valley White as
      > superior to Snow. Should
      > be readily available.
      >
      > What you call Henry Tabor is probably George L.
      > Tabor. A reasonable
      > guess on the lavender would be the Korean azalea
      > R.yedoense var.
      > poukhanense...sometimes called
      > Poukhanense...blooming a week or 2 ahead
      > of Geo. Tabor.
      >
      > Hope this helps.
      >
      >
      >
      > Will Ferrell
      >
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      >
      > From: Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC
      > <mailto:Ann.Sawyer2@...>
      >
      > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 11:26 AM
      >
      > Subject: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi all,
      >
      > I'm hoping to track down two azaleas.
      >
      > 1. Recently, people in this group have been
      > discussing an
      > azalea that is similar to "Snow" but is superior and
      > more desirable. I
      > would love to know the name of this so I can acquire
      > some.
      >
      > 2. I have some of the larger azaleas - Formosa,
      > Mrs. GG
      > Gerbing, and Henry Taber. They are a deep pink,
      > white, and pink &
      > white, respectively. I (think) I remember another
      > large one that had
      > medium intensity lavender flowers. In recent years
      > I have not seen this
      > anywhere. Does anyone know anything about this
      > azalea? Did I dream it
      > up?
      >
      > Ann M. Sawyer
      >
      > AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care
      >
      > (757) 722-9961 x 3634
      >
      >
      >
      >


      __________________________________________________
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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    • William C. Miller III
      Mike, Is your reference to Frostbery Yates possibly Frostburg , introduced by Henry R. Yates of Frostburg, Maryland? Bill Miller Bethesda, Maryland
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 7 8:07 AM
        Mike,

        Is your reference to Frostbery Yates possibly 'Frostburg', introduced by Henry R. Yates of Frostburg, Maryland?

        Bill Miller
        Bethesda, Maryland

        Mike Creel wrote:

        I grow a lot of whites (for hybridization purposes)
        here in the center of South. Good doers for me are HH
        Hume (very early and sporadically in late winter),
        Delaware Valley White, Sun Valley, and most recently
        Frostbery Yates. There is a common white azalea
        (whose name I temporarily forget) that blooms at the
        same time as Snow, but does not hold the dead flowers.
        It does well for me too.
        Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

        --- "Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC" <Ann.Sawyer2@ va.gov>
        wrote:

        > Mr. Ferrell,
        >
        >
        >
        > Yes, thanks, 'George L Tabor' is correct. I was
        > relying on my memory -
        > HA! I should know better by now. Thanks for the
        > advice on the azaleas.
        > I am very interested in the 'poukhanense' and am
        > going to look that up
        > right away. I plan also to pursue 'Delaware Valley
        > White'.
        >
        >
        >
        > Thanks again,
        >
        >
        >
        > Ann
        >
        >
        >
        > Ann M. Sawyer
        >
        > AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care
        >
        > (757) 722-9961 x 3634
        >
        > ____________ _________ _________ __
        >
        > From: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
        > [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups .com] On Behalf
        > Of Will and Kate Ferrell
        > Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 8:46 PM
        > To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
        > Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas
        >
        >
        >
        > Ms. Sawyer,
        >
        > I would recommend Delaware Valley White as
        > superior to Snow. Should
        > be readily available.
        >
        > What you call Henry Tabor is probably George L.
        > Tabor. A reasonable
        > guess on the lavender would be the Korean azalea
        > R.yedoense var.
        > poukhanense. ..sometimes called
        > Poukhanense. ..blooming a week or 2 ahead
        > of Geo. Tabor.
        >
        > Hope this helps.
        >
        >
        >
        > Will Ferrell
        >
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        >
        > From: Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC
        > <mailto:Ann.Sawyer2@ va.gov>
        >
        > To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
        >
        > Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 11:26 AM
        >
        > Subject: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi all,
        >
        > I'm hoping to track down two azaleas.
        >
        > 1. Recently, people in this group have been
        > discussing an
        > azalea that is similar to "Snow" but is superior and
        > more desirable. I
        > would love to know the name of this so I can acquire
        > some.
        >
        > 2. I have some of the larger azaleas - Formosa,
        > Mrs. GG
        > Gerbing, and Henry Taber. They are a deep pink,
        > white, and pink &
        > white, respectively. I (think) I remember another
        > large one that had
        > medium intensity lavender flowers. In recent years
        > I have not seen this
        > anywhere. Does anyone know anything about this
        > azalea? Did I dream it
        > up?
        >
        > Ann M. Sawyer
        >
        > AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care
        >
        > (757) 722-9961 x 3634
        >
        >
        >
        >

        ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail. yahoo.com

      • Mike Creel
        Yes, Frostberg Yates is correct. I was typing too fast, preparing to go shopping with my wife and daughter, who was visiting from Philly. Frostberg Yates
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 7 1:57 PM
          Yes, Frostberg Yates is correct. I was typing too
          fast, preparing to go shopping with my wife and
          daughter, who was visiting from Philly. Frostberg
          Yates seems to be a tetraploid based in its growth
          vigor and its ability to fertilize a yellow tetraploid
          yellow azalea.

          I wish I could remember the name of the other white, a
          single flower, that blooms at the same time as Snow.
          Okay, I just walked outside and checked a nice pot of
          OP 2003 seedlings, and the white is Glacier, a
          Glendale I think. I also like the white Encore named
          Autumn Angel, though my largest plant of it died
          because I did not loosen the pot-ound roots before
          planting.

          I am growing a white named Casablanca Tetra that seems
          to be doing well, quite vigorous. Just how do you
          convert an established variety into a tetraploid? Can
          you treat rooted cuttings with colchicine?
          Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

          --- "William C. Miller III" <bill@...>
          wrote:

          > Mike,
          >
          > Is your reference to Frostbery Yates possibly
          > 'Frostburg', introduced by
          > Henry R. Yates of Frostburg, Maryland?
          >
          > Bill Miller
          > Bethesda, Maryland
          >
          > Mike Creel wrote:
          >
          > > I grow a lot of whites (for hybridization
          > purposes)
          > > here in the center of South. Good doers for me are
          > HH
          > > Hume (very early and sporadically in late winter),
          > > Delaware Valley White, Sun Valley, and most
          > recently
          > > Frostbery Yates. There is a common white azalea
          > > (whose name I temporarily forget) that blooms at
          > the
          > > same time as Snow, but does not hold the dead
          > flowers.
          > > It does well for me too.
          > > Mike Creel, Lexington, SC
          > >
          > > --- "Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC" <Ann.Sawyer2@...
          > > <mailto:Ann.Sawyer2%40va.gov>>
          > > wrote:
          > >
          > > > Mr. Ferrell,
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Yes, thanks, 'George L Tabor' is correct. I was
          > > > relying on my memory -
          > > > HA! I should know better by now. Thanks for the
          > > > advice on the azaleas.
          > > > I am very interested in the 'poukhanense' and am
          > > > going to look that up
          > > > right away. I plan also to pursue 'Delaware
          > Valley
          > > > White'.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Thanks again,
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Ann
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Ann M. Sawyer
          > > >
          > > > AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care
          > > >
          > > > (757) 722-9961 x 3634
          > > >
          > > > ________________________________
          > > >
          > > > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>
          > > > [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>]
          > > On Behalf
          > > > Of Will and Kate Ferrell
          > > > Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 8:46 PM
          > > > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>
          > > > Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Ms. Sawyer,
          > > >
          > > > I would recommend Delaware Valley White as
          > > > superior to Snow. Should
          > > > be readily available.
          > > >
          > > > What you call Henry Tabor is probably George L.
          > > > Tabor. A reasonable
          > > > guess on the lavender would be the Korean azalea
          > > > R.yedoense var.
          > > > poukhanense...sometimes called
          > > > Poukhanense...blooming a week or 2 ahead
          > > > of Geo. Tabor.
          > > >
          > > > Hope this helps.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Will Ferrell
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > >
          > > > From: Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC
          > > > <mailto:Ann.Sawyer2@...
          > <mailto:Ann.Sawyer2%40va.gov>>
          > > >
          > > > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>
          > > >
          > > > Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 11:26 AM
          > > >
          > > > Subject: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Hi all,
          > > >
          > > > I'm hoping to track down two azaleas.
          > > >
          > > > 1. Recently, people in this group have been
          > > > discussing an
          > > > azalea that is similar to "Snow" but is superior
          > and
          > > > more desirable. I
          > > > would love to know the name of this so I can
          > acquire
          > > > some.
          > > >
          > > > 2. I have some of the larger azaleas - Formosa,
          > > > Mrs. GG
          > > > Gerbing, and Henry Taber. They are a deep pink,
          > > > white, and pink &
          > > > white, respectively. I (think) I remember
          > another
          > > > large one that had
          > > > medium intensity lavender flowers. In recent
          > years
          > > > I have not seen this
          > > > anywhere. Does anyone know anything about this
          > > > azalea? Did I dream it
          > > > up?
          > > >
          > > > Ann M. Sawyer
          > > >
          > > > AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care
          > > >
          > > > (757) 722-9961 x 3634
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > __________________________________________________
          > > Do You Yahoo!?
          > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
          > protection around
          > > http://mail.yahoo.com <http://mail.yahoo.com>
          > >
          > >
          >
          >


          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          http://mail.yahoo.com
        • William C. Miller III
          Mike, Glacier is a Glenn Dale hybrid. It has often been used for it s tendency to convey its nice foliage. I m very curious about Frostberg Yates. What can
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 7 2:14 PM
            Mike,

            'Glacier' is a Glenn Dale hybrid.  It has often been used for it's tendency to convey its nice foliage.

            I'm very curious about Frostberg Yates.  What can you tell me about its origin?

            Bill Miller
            Bethesda, Maryland

            Mike Creel wrote:

            Yes, Frostberg Yates is correct. I was typing too
            fast, preparing to go shopping with my wife and
            daughter, who was visiting from Philly. Frostberg
            Yates seems to be a tetraploid based in its growth
            vigor and its ability to fertilize a yellow tetraploid
            yellow azalea.

            I wish I could remember the name of the other white, a
            single flower, that blooms at the same time as Snow.
            Okay, I just walked outside and checked a nice pot of
            OP 2003 seedlings, and the white is Glacier, a
            Glendale I think. I also like the white Encore named
            Autumn Angel, though my largest plant of it died
            because I did not loosen the pot-ound roots before
            planting.

            I am growing a white named Casablanca Tetra that seems
            to be doing well, quite vigorous. Just how do you
            convert an established variety into a tetraploid? Can
            you treat rooted cuttings with colchicine?
            Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

            --- "William C. Miller III" <bill@theazaleaworks .com>
            wrote:

            > Mike,
            >
            > Is your reference to Frostbery Yates possibly
            > 'Frostburg', introduced by
            > Henry R. Yates of Frostburg, Maryland?
            >
            > Bill Miller
            > Bethesda, Maryland
            >
            > Mike Creel wrote:
            >
            > > I grow a lot of whites (for hybridization
            > purposes)
            > > here in the center of South. Good doers for me are
            > HH
            > > Hume (very early and sporadically in late winter),
            > > Delaware Valley White, Sun Valley, and most
            > recently
            > > Frostbery Yates. There is a common white azalea
            > > (whose name I temporarily forget) that blooms at
            > the
            > > same time as Snow, but does not hold the dead
            > flowers.
            > > It does well for me too.
            > > Mike Creel, Lexington, SC
            > >
            > > --- "Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC" <Ann.Sawyer2@ va.gov
            > > <mailto:Ann. Sawyer2%40va. gov>>
            > > wrote:
            > >
            > > > Mr. Ferrell,
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Yes, thanks, 'George L Tabor' is correct. I was
            > > > relying on my memory -
            > > > HA! I should know better by now. Thanks for the
            > > > advice on the azaleas.
            > > > I am very interested in the 'poukhanense' and am
            > > > going to look that up
            > > > right away. I plan also to pursue 'Delaware
            > Valley
            > > > White'.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Thanks again,
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Ann
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Ann M. Sawyer
            > > >
            > > > AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care
            > > >
            > > > (757) 722-9961 x 3634
            > > >
            > > > ____________ _________ _________ __
            > > >
            > > > From: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
            > <mailto:azaleas% 40yahoogroups. com>
            > > > [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups .com
            > <mailto:azaleas% 40yahoogroups. com>]
            > > On Behalf
            > > > Of Will and Kate Ferrell
            > > > Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 8:46 PM
            > > > To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
            > <mailto:azaleas% 40yahoogroups. com>
            > > > Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Ms. Sawyer,
            > > >
            > > > I would recommend Delaware Valley White as
            > > > superior to Snow. Should
            > > > be readily available.
            > > >
            > > > What you call Henry Tabor is probably George L.
            > > > Tabor. A reasonable
            > > > guess on the lavender would be the Korean azalea
            > > > R.yedoense var.
            > > > poukhanense. ..sometimes called
            > > > Poukhanense. ..blooming a week or 2 ahead
            > > > of Geo. Tabor.
            > > >
            > > > Hope this helps.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Will Ferrell
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > >
            > > > From: Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC
            > > > <mailto:Ann.Sawyer2@ va.gov
            > <mailto:Ann. Sawyer2%40va. gov>>
            > > >
            > > > To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
            > <mailto:azaleas% 40yahoogroups. com>
            > > >
            > > > Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 11:26 AM
            > > >
            > > > Subject: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Hi all,
            > > >
            > > > I'm hoping to track down two azaleas.
            > > >
            > > > 1. Recently, people in this group have been
            > > > discussing an
            > > > azalea that is similar to "Snow" but is superior
            > and
            > > > more desirable. I
            > > > would love to know the name of this so I can
            > acquire
            > > > some.
            > > >
            > > > 2. I have some of the larger azaleas - Formosa,
            > > > Mrs. GG
            > > > Gerbing, and Henry Taber. They are a deep pink,
            > > > white, and pink &
            > > > white, respectively. I (think) I remember
            > another
            > > > large one that had
            > > > medium intensity lavender flowers. In recent
            > years
            > > > I have not seen this
            > > > anywhere. Does anyone know anything about this
            > > > azalea? Did I dream it
            > > > up?
            > > >
            > > > Ann M. Sawyer
            > > >
            > > > AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care
            > > >
            > > > (757) 722-9961 x 3634
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
            > > Do You Yahoo!?
            > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
            > protection around
            > > http://mail. yahoo.com <http://mail. yahoo.com>
            > >
            > >
            >
            >

            ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
            Do You Yahoo!?
            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            http://mail. yahoo.com

          • Mike Creel
            Apparently the EXACT and real name is Frostburg. here is a link showing origin http://www.rhododendron.org/descriptionAH_new.asp?ID=9 Here is a link to a
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 7 3:21 PM
              Apparently the EXACT and real name is Frostburg. here
              is a link showing origin
              http://www.rhododendron.org/descriptionAH_new.asp?ID=9

              Here is a link to a photo of Frostburg (Yates)
              http://www.pbase.com/image/17458603

              Frostburg (Yates) grows just as vigorously as
              Casablanca Tetra or Tetra Casablanca. I am not sure
              which name is accepted.

              Some other evergreens with very vigorous growth are
              Anytime Tetra (not sure if name is accepted) and Venus
              Baby.

              Some new plants I am trying out (July 2006
              acquisitions) are the azalea Washington State
              Centennial (just repotted to a coarser media) and the
              rhododendron Maxecat.
              Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

              --- "William C. Miller III" <bill@...>
              wrote:

              > Mike,
              >
              > 'Glacier' is a Glenn Dale hybrid. It has often been
              > used for it's
              > tendency to convey its nice foliage.
              >
              > I'm very curious about Frostberg Yates. What can
              > you tell me about its
              > origin?
              >
              > Bill Miller
              > Bethesda, Maryland
              >
              > Mike Creel wrote:
              >
              > > Yes, Frostberg Yates is correct. I was typing too
              > > fast, preparing to go shopping with my wife and
              > > daughter, who was visiting from Philly. Frostberg
              > > Yates seems to be a tetraploid based in its growth
              > > vigor and its ability to fertilize a yellow
              > tetraploid
              > > yellow azalea.
              > >
              > > I wish I could remember the name of the other
              > white, a
              > > single flower, that blooms at the same time as
              > Snow.
              > > Okay, I just walked outside and checked a nice pot
              > of
              > > OP 2003 seedlings, and the white is Glacier, a
              > > Glendale I think. I also like the white Encore
              > named
              > > Autumn Angel, though my largest plant of it died
              > > because I did not loosen the pot-ound roots before
              > > planting.
              > >
              > > I am growing a white named Casablanca Tetra that
              > seems
              > > to be doing well, quite vigorous. Just how do you
              > > convert an established variety into a tetraploid?
              > Can
              > > you treat rooted cuttings with colchicine?
              > > Mike Creel, Lexington, SC
              > >
              > > --- "William C. Miller III"
              > <bill@...
              > > <mailto:bill%40theazaleaworks.com>>
              > > wrote:
              > >
              > > > Mike,
              > > >
              > > > Is your reference to Frostbery Yates possibly
              > > > 'Frostburg', introduced by
              > > > Henry R. Yates of Frostburg, Maryland?
              > > >
              > > > Bill Miller
              > > > Bethesda, Maryland
              > > >
              > > > Mike Creel wrote:
              > > >
              > > > > I grow a lot of whites (for hybridization
              > > > purposes)
              > > > > here in the center of South. Good doers for me
              > are
              > > > HH
              > > > > Hume (very early and sporadically in late
              > winter),
              > > > > Delaware Valley White, Sun Valley, and most
              > > > recently
              > > > > Frostbery Yates. There is a common white
              > azalea
              > > > > (whose name I temporarily forget) that blooms
              > at
              > > > the
              > > > > same time as Snow, but does not hold the dead
              > > > flowers.
              > > > > It does well for me too.
              > > > > Mike Creel, Lexington, SC
              > > > >
              > > > > --- "Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC" <Ann.Sawyer2@...
              > > <mailto:Ann.Sawyer2%40va.gov>
              > > > > <mailto:Ann.Sawyer2%40va.gov>>
              > > > > wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > > Mr. Ferrell,
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Yes, thanks, 'George L Tabor' is correct. I
              > was
              > > > > > relying on my memory -
              > > > > > HA! I should know better by now. Thanks for
              > the
              > > > > > advice on the azaleas.
              > > > > > I am very interested in the 'poukhanense'
              > and am
              > > > > > going to look that up
              > > > > > right away. I plan also to pursue 'Delaware
              > > > Valley
              > > > > > White'.
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Thanks again,
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Ann
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Ann M. Sawyer
              > > > > >
              > > > > > AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care
              > > > > >
              > > > > > (757) 722-9961 x 3634
              > > > > >
              > > > > > ________________________________
              > > > > >
              > > > > > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>
              > > > <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>
              > > > > > [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>
              > > > <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>]
              > > > > On Behalf
              > > > > > Of Will and Kate Ferrell
              > > > > > Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 8:46 PM
              > > > > > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>
              > > > <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>
              > > > > > Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of
              > azaleas
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Ms. Sawyer,
              > > > > >
              > > > > > I would recommend Delaware Valley White as
              > > > > > superior to Snow. Should
              > > > > > be readily available.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > What you call Henry Tabor is probably George
              > L.
              > > > > > Tabor. A reasonable
              > > > > > guess on the lavender would be the Korean
              > azalea
              > > > > > R.yedoense var.
              > > > > > poukhanense...sometimes called
              > > > > > Poukhanense...blooming a week or 2 ahead
              > > > > > of Geo. Tabor.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Hope this helps.
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Will Ferrell
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > > > >
              > > > > > From: Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC
              > > > > > <mailto:Ann.Sawyer2@...
              > <mailto:Ann.Sawyer2%40va.gov>
              > > > <mailto:Ann.Sawyer2%40va.gov>>
              > > > > >
              > > > > > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>
              > > > <mailto:azaleas%40yahoogroups.com>
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 11:26 AM
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Subject: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Hi all,
              > > > > >
              > > > > > I'm hoping to track down two azaleas.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > 1. Recently, people in this group have been
              > > > > > discussing an
              > > > > > azalea that is similar to "Snow" but is
              > superior
              > > > and
              > > > > > more desirable. I
              > > > > > would love to know the name of this so I can
              > > > acquire
              > > > > > some.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > 2. I have some of the larger azaleas -
              > Formosa,
              > > > > > Mrs. GG
              > > > > > Gerbing, and Henry Taber. They are a deep
              > pink,
              > > > > > white, and pink &
              > > > > > white, respectively. I (think) I remember
              > > > another
              > > > > > large one that had
              > > > > > medium intensity lavender flowers. In recent
              >
              === message truncated ===


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            • William C. Miller III
              Mike The International Rhododendron Register and Checklist (IRRC) lists Casablanca Tetraploid with Casablanca Tetra as a synonym. It is a tetraploid
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 7 3:50 PM
                Mike

                The International Rhododendron Register and Checklist (IRRC) lists 'Casablanca Tetraploid' with 'Casablanca Tetra' as a synonym.  It is a tetraploid derived from colchicine treatment of 'Casablanca', one of the Beltsville or Yerkes-Pryor hybrids.

                I saw a reference for an article in Hort Science:

                Pryor, R. L. and L. C. Frazier.   Colchicine-induced tetraploid azaleas.  HortScience 3: 282-285, 1968.

                'Anytime Tetra' appears in the IRRC.

                Bill Miller
                Bethesda, Maryland
                www.theazaleaworks.com



                Mike Creel wrote:

                Apparently the EXACT and real name is Frostburg. here
                is a link showing origin
                http://www.rhododen dron.org/ descriptionAH_ new.asp?ID= 9

                Here is a link to a photo of Frostburg (Yates)
                http://www.pbase. com/image/ 17458603

                Frostburg (Yates) grows just as vigorously as
                Casablanca Tetra or Tetra Casablanca. I am not sure
                which name is accepted.

                Some other evergreens with very vigorous growth are
                Anytime Tetra (not sure if name is accepted) and Venus
                Baby.

                Some new plants I am trying out (July 2006
                acquisitions) are the azalea Washington State
                Centennial (just repotted to a coarser media) and the
                rhododendron Maxecat.
                Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

                -



              • Will and Kate Ferrell
                Bill, Regarding your statement A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other. Conventional wisdom holds that
                Message 7 of 14 , Aug 7 8:57 PM
                  Bill,
                      Regarding your statement "A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other.  Conventional wisdom holds that the calyx transforms into a second corolla to give you the hose-in-hose condition... . "
                      I have heard it said that azaleas with distinct sepals (which compose the calyx) are more self-clensing once the blooms are finished.  That would imply that hose-in-hose blooms, having lost their calyx, tend to hang on.  Can you comment?
                      Also, I mentioned Delaware Valley White because of accessability.  Around here it is about the only good white you can buy.  Is there anything in particular you find deficient in it other than banality?
                   
                  Will
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Monday, August 07, 2006 10:52 AM
                  Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

                  Ann,

                  'Betty Anne Voss' is a nice pink double... which means the stamen are transformed into petals...looks sort of like a rose in that it has lots of petals and no stamen.

                  A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other.  Conventional wisdom holds that the calyx transforms into a second corolla to give you the hose-in-hose condition... . but it gets confusing when you have a hose-in-hose flower that has a calyx.

                  Experts are very useful.  However, listening to experts should only be carried so far.  Twelve independent experts could give you twelve different recommendations.  To the point, 'Delaware Valley White' would not be one of my recommendations.  It is a perfectly fine azalea, but (in my opinion) there are so many other/better/ newer options for someone interested in a white azalea.  You already know about 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing'.  I like 'Palestrina' , 'Seattle White', 'Georgia Giant', 'Hakatashiro' , 'Patrick William', 'Niagara', 'Treasure', 'Sheila' ..... and the list would get longer if I thought about it a little more.  But, my point is that there isn't one right answer to selecting an azalea once you get past whether or not it is suitable (hardy enough) for your specific environment. 

                  The current definitive text on azaleas is AZALEAS by Fred Galle.  It's about a $70 book from Timber Press, but you can get it for less on the Internet, it sometimes turns up at used book stores, or you can check it out of the library.  The Azalea Society has a lot of images of azaleas on their Web site., and another resource that you might look at is Google.  You can do an image search on an azalea cultivar name and occasionally there are pretty good pictures.

                  Get lots of expert recommendations but do a little homework before you spend any money.

                  Bill Miller
                  Bethesda, Maryland
                  www.theazaleaworks. com

                  Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC wrote:

                  Hi Bill,

                  I neglected to include my location in my e-mail, but you surmised correctly as I am in Hampton , Virginia which is on the coast.  Thank you for the informative e-mail.  I love ‘Betty Ann Voss’ which I believe is a hose-in-hose flower, so the ‘H. H. Hume’ sounds lovely.  I was intrigued when I saw experienced azalea lovers/growers recommend a certain cultivar – to whom better to listen than the experienced?

                  Azaleas do grow very well in my area, in fact, across the Chesapeake Bay in Norfolk , VA an Azalea Festival is held each year.

                  Thanks again,

                  Ann

                  Ann M. Sawyer

                  AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care

                  (757) 722-9961 x 3634 


                  From: azaleas@yahoogroups .com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups .com ] On Behalf Of William C. Miller III
                  Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 3:00 PM
                  To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
                  Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

                  Hi Ann,

                  Regarding item #1 -  If you are really interested in a small, white,  hose-in-hose flower, perhaps 'H. H. Hume' might be a consideration.  It is derived from 'Snow'.  I share Dave Nanney's opinion regarding 'Snow'.  I don't recommend 'Snow' for anyone.   Please note that I enclose cultivar names in single quotes.  That's the proper convention.

                  Regarding item #2 -  It's not widely known but 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing' and 'George L. Taber' are related.  They are different versions of the same plant.  Given enough time, your white 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing' will produce a few 'George L. Taber' flowers.... and your 'George L. Taber' will produce a few white flowers.

                  I've forgotten where you are from.  Your 757 area code suggest eastern Virginia ?  In any case, there are many thousands of azaleas and you would have little problem growing them in your area.

                  Bill Miller
                  Bethesda , Maryland
                  www.theazaleaworks. com

                  Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC wrote:

                  Hi all,

                  I’m hoping to track down two azaleas. 

                  1. Recently, people in this group have been discussing an azalea that is similar to “Snow” but is superior and more desirable.  I would love to know the name of this so I can acquire some.

                  2.  I have some of the larger azaleas – Formosa , Mrs. GG Gerbing, and  Henry Taber.  They are a deep pink, white, and pink & white, respectively.   I (think) I remember another large one that had medium intensity lavender flowers.  In recent years I have not seen this anywhere.  Does anyone know anything about this azalea?  Did I dream it up?

                  Ann M. Sawyer

                  AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care

                  (757) 722-9961 x 3634 

              • William C. Miller III
                Will, I tried to be careful about my comment regarding Delaware Valley White . My problem with DVW is very general. DVW falls in the same category as Coral
                Message 8 of 14 , Aug 8 4:53 AM
                  Will,

                  I tried to be careful about my comment regarding 'Delaware Valley White'.  My problem with DVW is very general.  DVW falls in the same category as 'Coral Bells', 'Hinodegiri', 'Snow', 'Fashion' and maybe three or four others that folks keep recommending without any consideration for newer developments (that are only 50 years old).  One still sees people promoting 'Snow' despite it's unattractive tendency to persist, and I wouldn't use 'Snow'  as a breeder for fear that it would pass its negatives on to its progeny.

                  Unfortunately, since petal blight is a fact of life here, I haven't paid much attention to flower abscission.  But, you pose an interesting question.  Perhaps someone else can comment...is there a plant physiologist in the house?

                  Bill Miller
                  Bethesda, Maryland
                  www.theazaleaworks.com

                  Will and Kate Ferrell wrote:

                  Bill,
                      Regarding your statement "A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other.  Conventional wisdom holds that the calyx transforms into a second corolla to give you the hose-in-hose condition... . "
                      I have heard it said that azaleas with distinct sepals (which compose the calyx) are more self-clensing once the blooms are finished.  That would imply that hose-in-hose blooms, having lost their calyx, tend to hang on.  Can you comment?
                      Also, I mentioned Delaware Valley White because of accessability.  Around here it is about the only good white you can buy.  Is there anything in particular you find deficient in it other than banality?
                   
                  Will
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Monday, August 07, 2006 10:52 AM
                  Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

                  Ann,

                  'Betty Anne Voss' is a nice pink double... which means the stamen are transformed into petals...looks sort of like a rose in that it has lots of petals and no stamen.

                  A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other.  Conventional wisdom holds that the calyx transforms into a second corolla to give you the hose-in-hose condition... . but it gets confusing when you have a hose-in-hose flower that has a calyx.

                  Experts are very useful.  However, listening to experts should only be carried so far.  Twelve independent experts could give you twelve different recommendations.  To the point, 'Delaware Valley White' would not be one of my recommendations.  It is a perfectly fine azalea, but (in my opinion) there are so many other/better/ newer options for someone interested in a white azalea.  You already know about 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing'.  I like 'Palestrina' , 'Seattle White', 'Georgia Giant', 'Hakatashiro' , 'Patrick William', 'Niagara', 'Treasure', 'Sheila' ..... and the list would get longer if I thought about it a little more.  But, my point is that there isn't one right answer to selecting an azalea once you get past whether or not it is suitable (hardy enough) for your specific environment. 

                  The current definitive text on azaleas is AZALEAS by Fred Galle.  It's about a $70 book from Timber Press, but you can get it for less on the Internet, it sometimes turns up at used book stores, or you can check it out of the library.  The Azalea Society has a lot of images of azaleas on their Web site., and another resource that you might look at is Google.  You can do an image search on an azalea cultivar name and occasionally there are pretty good pictures.

                  Get lots of expert recommendations but do a little homework before you spend any money.

                  Bill Miller
                  Bethesda, Maryland
                  www.theazaleaworks. com



                • Joe Schild
                  Bill and All, As for Delaware Valley White , I have a number of them in my garden and do love the larger white, self cleaning flowers. However, this cultivar
                  Message 9 of 14 , Aug 8 4:49 PM
                    Bill and All,
                    As for 'Delaware Valley White', I have a number of them in my garden and do love the larger white, self cleaning flowers. However, this cultivar does have one characteristic that is a negative, it is very susceptible to rhododendron stem borer and limb loss. I really do not know why this cultivar seems to attract the stem borers, but others have noted the same problem. I seem to recall that Lee described this problem in his notes on DVW.
                     
                    Periodically, I go through DVW and remove dead limbs by the loads and see the obvious damage by the borers. Through the years I have resisted the use of chemicals to control this plant pest by using the simple removal process by cutting out the effected limbs and ridding the plant of the borer.
                     
                    As for appearance, the foliage is nice, but not as deep a green as say, the Glenn Dale 'Glacier', an excellent white with greasy green leaves. DVW does, like most white flowering azaleas, exhibit the fall showing of yellow leaves that do drop off.
                     
                    Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
                    Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
                     
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: 8/8/2006 8:08:50 AM
                    Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

                    Will,

                    I tried to be careful about my comment regarding 'Delaware Valley White'.  My problem with DVW is very general.  DVW falls in the same category as 'Coral Bells', 'Hinodegiri' , 'Snow', 'Fashion' and maybe three or four others that folks keep recommending without any consideration for newer developments (that are only 50 years old).  One still sees people promoting 'Snow' despite it's unattractive tendency to persist, and I wouldn't use 'Snow'  as a breeder for fear that it would pass its negatives on to its progeny.

                    Unfortunately, since petal blight is a fact of life here, I haven't paid much attention to flower abscission.  But, you pose an interesting question.  Perhaps someone else can comment...is there a plant physiologist in the house?

                    Bill Miller
                    Bethesda, Maryland
                    www.theazaleaworks. com

                    Will and Kate Ferrell wrote:

                    Bill,
                        Regarding your statement "A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other.  Conventional wisdom holds that the calyx transforms into a second corolla to give you the hose-in-hose condition... . "
                        I have heard it said that azaleas with distinct sepals (which compose the calyx) are more self-clensing once the blooms are finished.  That would imply that hose-in-hose blooms, having lost their calyx, tend to hang on.  Can you comment?
                        Also, I mentioned Delaware Valley White because of accessability.  Around here it is about the only good white you can buy.  Is there anything in particular you find deficient in it other than banality?
                     
                    Will
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Monday, August 07, 2006 10:52 AM
                    Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

                    Ann,

                    'Betty Anne Voss' is a nice pink double... which means the stamen are transformed into petals...looks sort of like a rose in that it has lots of petals and no stamen.

                    A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other.  Conventional wisdom holds that the calyx transforms into a second corolla to give you the hose-in-hose condition... . but it gets confusing when you have a hose-in-hose flower that has a calyx.

                    Experts are very useful.  However, listening to experts should only be carried so far.  Twelve independent experts could give you twelve different recommendations.  To the point, 'Delaware Valley White' would not be one of my recommendations.  It is a perfectly fine azalea, but (in my opinion) there are so many other/better/ newer options for someone interested in a white azalea.  You already know about 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing'.  I like 'Palestrina' , 'Seattle White', 'Georgia Giant', 'Hakatashiro' , 'Patrick William', 'Niagara', 'Treasure', 'Sheila' ..... and the list would get longer if I thought about it a little more.  But, my point is that there isn't one right answer to selecting an azalea once you get past whether or not it is suitable (hardy enough) for your specific environment. 

                    The current definitive text on azaleas is AZALEAS by Fred Galle.  It's about a $70 book from Timber Press, but you can get it for less on the Internet, it sometimes turns up at used book stores, or you can check it out of the library.  The Azalea Society has a lot of images of azaleas on their Web site., and another resource that you might look at is Google.  You can do an image search on an azalea cultivar name and occasionally there are pretty good pictures.

                    Get lots of expert recommendations but do a little homework before you spend any money.

                    Bill Miller
                    Bethesda, Maryland
                    www.theazaleaworks. com



                  • john f smith
                    Joe, I was really surprised at your experience with DVW concerning rhodendron stem borer and limb loss. I have 20 - 24 DVW s around my planted acre and
                    Message 10 of 14 , Aug 9 4:37 PM
                      Joe,
                      I was really surprised at your experience with 'DVW' concerning  rhodendron stem borer and limb loss.  I have 20 - 24  'DVW's' around my planted acre and I have never seen the effects of stem borer or limb loss on any of them.  The only insect problem I've ever had with them is lace bugs and that is now  controlled very effectively with a  Grub Control formulation.  I have had a good bit of stem borer damage over the years on my Knap Hill hybrids and on my rhodies - also on two or three Encores and maybe a couple of other evergreens.  I now do just as you do to control the borers - inspect carefully and remove and destroy down to good wood any branches they have invaded.
                       
                      I am at a loss to explain why the pesky critters like your 'DVW's' but not mine.   My 'DVW's' have thrived on this acre without borer problems now for sixteen years.  Am I just lucky? What do you think?
                       
                      John Smith
                      Patrick Co, VA - zone 7
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: 8/8/2006 19:56:00
                      Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

                      Bill and All,
                      As for 'Delaware Valley White', I have a number of them in my garden and do love the larger white, self cleaning flowers. However, this cultivar does have one characteristic that is a negative, it is very susceptible to rhododendron stem borer and limb loss. I really do not know why this cultivar seems to attract the stem borers, but others have noted the same problem. I seem to recall that Lee described this problem in his notes on DVW.
                       
                      Periodically, I go through DVW and remove dead limbs by the loads and see the obvious damage by the borers. Through the years I have resisted the use of chemicals to control this plant pest by using the simple removal process by cutting out the effected limbs and ridding the plant of the borer.
                       
                      As for appearance, the foliage is nice, but not as deep a green as say, the Glenn Dale 'Glacier', an excellent white with greasy green leaves. DVW does, like most white flowering azaleas, exhibit the fall showing of yellow leaves that do drop off.
                       
                      Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
                      Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
                       
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: 8/8/2006 8:08:50 AM
                      Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

                      Will,

                      I tried to be careful about my comment regarding 'Delaware Valley White'.  My problem with DVW is very general.  DVW falls in the same category as 'Coral Bells', 'Hinodegiri' , 'Snow', 'Fashion' and maybe three or four others that folks keep recommending without any consideration for newer developments (that are only 50 years old).  One still sees people promoting 'Snow' despite it's unattractive tendency to persist, and I wouldn't use 'Snow'  as a breeder for fear that it would pass its negatives on to its progeny.

                      Unfortunately, since petal blight is a fact of life here, I haven't paid much attention to flower abscission.  But, you pose an interesting question.  Perhaps someone else can comment...is there a plant physiologist in the house?

                      Bill Miller
                      Bethesda, Maryland
                      www.theazaleaworks. com

                      Will and Kate Ferrell wrote:

                      Bill,
                          Regarding your statement "A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other.  Conventional wisdom holds that the calyx transforms into a second corolla to give you the hose-in-hose condition... . "
                          I have heard it said that azaleas with distinct sepals (which compose the calyx) are more self-clensing once the blooms are finished.  That would imply that hose-in-hose blooms, having lost their calyx, tend to hang on.  Can you comment?
                          Also, I mentioned Delaware Valley White because of accessability.  Around here it is about the only good white you can buy.  Is there anything in particular you find deficient in it other than banality?
                       
                      Will
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Monday, August 07, 2006 10:52 AM
                      Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

                      Ann,

                      'Betty Anne Voss' is a nice pink double... which means the stamen are transformed into petals...looks sort of like a rose in that it has lots of petals and no stamen.

                      A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other.  Conventional wisdom holds that the calyx transforms into a second corolla to give you the hose-in-hose condition... . but it gets confusing when you have a hose-in-hose flower that has a calyx.

                      Experts are very useful.  However, listening to experts should only be carried so far.  Twelve independent experts could give you twelve different recommendations.  To the point, 'Delaware Valley White' would not be one of my recommendations.  It is a perfectly fine azalea, but (in my opinion) there are so many other/better/ newer options for someone interested in a white azalea.  You already know about 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing'.  I like 'Palestrina' , 'Seattle White', 'Georgia Giant', 'Hakatashiro' , 'Patrick William', 'Niagara', 'Treasure', 'Sheila' ..... and the list would get longer if I thought about it a little more.  But, my point is that there isn't one right answer to selecting an azalea once you get past whether or not it is suitable (hardy enough) for your specific environment. 

                      The current definitive text on azaleas is AZALEAS by Fred Galle.  It's about a $70 book from Timber Press, but you can get it for less on the Internet, it sometimes turns up at used book stores, or you can check it out of the library.  The Azalea Society has a lot of images of azaleas on their Web site., and another resource that you might look at is Google.  You can do an image search on an azalea cultivar name and occasionally there are pretty good pictures.

                      Get lots of expert recommendations but do a little homework before you spend any money.

                      Bill Miller
                      Bethesda, Maryland
                      www.theazaleaworks. com



                    • Bill Pinkerton
                      I have been taking note of the comments on DVW az. and when I read Joe Schild s comment- I thought I had written that myself and signed his name. H.H. Hume
                      Message 11 of 14 , Aug 10 8:35 PM
                        I have been taking note of  the comments on DVW az.  and when I read Joe Schild's comment- I thought I had written that myself  and signed his name. H.H. Hume  has performed a little  better for me  here in Crossville,buds  are not  as hardy as DVW in cold winters,an also  no branch die back problem- Glacier is not as hardy in bud as DVW .Must give a reminder that I get  -10 and colder frequently-Girard's Pleasant White ,after 10 years,  gets  the branch die back  problem but puts on quite a show  and  is fairly bud hardy here but does bloom late-escapes all the frosty weather when in bloom-After 15 years, and no trimming or cutting back to produce new vigorous growth it withers away as various other cultivars do.
                         
                        Several folks in this area get DVW  as one gallon size from the bargain markets,  and WE have  a problem  getting  them to root in  and grow well-- I tried 3 plants  in three different areas  to finally get a "good" one!(15 years ago).
                         
                                                                         Bill Pinkerton
                                                                         Crossville Tn.
                         
                         
                        -------Original Message-------
                         
                        Date: 08/07/06 22:56:45
                        Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas
                         

                        Bill,
                            Regarding your statement "A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other.  Conventional wisdom holds that the calyx transforms into a second corolla to give you the hose-in-hose condition... . "
                            I have heard it said that azaleas with distinct sepals (which compose the calyx) are more self-clensing once the blooms are finished.  That would imply that hose-in-hose blooms, having lost their calyx, tend to hang on.  Can you comment?
                            Also, I mentioned Delaware Valley White because of accessability.  Around here it is about the only good white you can buy.  Is there anything in particular you find deficient in it other than banality?
                         
                        Will
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Monday, August 07, 2006 10:52 AM
                        Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

                        Ann,

                        'Betty Anne Voss' is a nice pink double... which means the stamen are transformed into petals...looks sort of like a rose in that it has lots of petals and no stamen.

                        A hose-in-hose flower is one in which there exists two cycles of petals...one inside the other.  Conventional wisdom holds that the calyx transforms into a second corolla to give you the hose-in-hose condition... . but it gets confusing when you have a hose-in-hose flower that has a calyx.

                        Experts are very useful.  However, listening to experts should only be carried so far.  Twelve independent experts could give you twelve different recommendations.  To the point, 'Delaware Valley White' would not be one of my recommendations.  It is a perfectly fine azalea, but (in my opinion) there are so many other/better/ newer options for someone interested in a white azalea.  You already know about 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing'.  I like 'Palestrina' , 'Seattle White', 'Georgia Giant', 'Hakatashiro' , 'Patrick William', 'Niagara', 'Treasure', 'Sheila' ..... and the list would get longer if I thought about it a little more.  But, my point is that there isn't one right answer to selecting an azalea once you get past whether or not it is suitable (hardy enough) for your specific environment. 

                        The current definitive text on azaleas is AZALEAS by Fred Galle.  It's about a $70 book from Timber Press, but you can get it for less on the Internet, it sometimes turns up at used book stores, or you can check it out of the library.  The Azalea Society has a lot of images of azaleas on their Web site., and another resource that you might look at is Google.  You can do an image search on an azalea cultivar name and occasionally there are pretty good pictures.

                        Get lots of expert recommendations but do a little homework before you spend any money.

                        Bill Miller
                        Bethesda, Maryland
                        www.theazaleaworks. com

                        Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC wrote:

                        Hi Bill,

                        I neglected to include my location in my e-mail, but you surmised correctly as I am in Hampton , Virginia which is on the coast.  Thank you for the informative e-mail.  I love ‘Betty Ann Voss’ which I believe is a hose-in-hose flower, so the ‘H. H. Hume’ sounds lovely.  I was intrigued when I saw experienced azalea lovers/growers recommend a certain cultivar – to whom better to listen than the experienced?

                        Azaleas do grow very well in my area, in fact, across the Chesapeake Bay in Norfolk , VA an Azalea Festival is held each year.

                        Thanks again,

                        Ann

                        Ann M. Sawyer

                        AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care

                        (757) 722-9961 x 3634 


                        From: azaleas@yahoogroups .com [mailto: azaleas@yahoogroups .com ] On Behalf Of William C. Miller III
                        Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 3:00 PM
                        To: azaleas@yahoogroups .com
                        Subject: Re: [AZ] looking for names of azaleas

                        Hi Ann,

                        Regarding item #1 -  If you are really interested in a small, white,  hose-in-hose flower, perhaps 'H. H. Hume' might be a consideration.  It is derived from 'Snow'.  I share Dave Nanney's opinion regarding 'Snow'.  I don't recommend 'Snow' for anyone.   Please note that I enclose cultivar names in single quotes.  That's the proper convention.

                        Regarding item #2 -  It's not widely known but 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing' and 'George L. Taber' are related.  They are different versions of the same plant.  Given enough time, your white 'Mrs. G. G. Gerbing' will produce a few 'George L. Taber' flowers.... and your 'George L. Taber' will produce a few white flowers.

                        I've forgotten where you are from.  Your 757 area code suggest eastern Virginia ?  In any case, there are many thousands of azaleas and you would have little problem growing them in your area.

                        Bill Miller
                        Bethesda , Maryland
                        www.theazaleaworks. com

                        Sawyer, Ann HAMVAMC wrote:

                        Hi all,

                        I’m hoping to track down two azaleas. 

                        1. Recently, people in this group have been discussing an azalea that is similar to “Snow” but is superior and more desirable.  I would love to know the name of this so I can acquire some.

                        2.  I have some of the larger azaleas – Formosa , Mrs. GG Gerbing, and  Henry Taber.  They are a deep pink, white, and pink & white, respectively.   I (think) I remember another large one that had medium intensity lavender flowers.  In recent years I have not seen this anywhere.  Does anyone know anything about this azalea?  Did I dream it up?

                        Ann M. Sawyer

                        AO, Geriatrics & Extended Care

                        (757) 722-9961 x 3634 

                         
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