Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

this is from the ASK US page, so please send me a CC

Expand Messages
  • Michael J Buckley
    I have three azaleas in front of my house and they grew so tall they were blocking our front window. I decided (after blooming) that I would trim them down to
    Message 1 of 279 , Apr 30, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      I have three azaleas in front of my house and they grew so tall they were blocking our front window. I decided (after blooming) that I would trim them down to window height. Not such a great idea because now all I have is a bunch of sticks (not one leaf was spared). Is there any chance these things will come back? If not, I will just pull them out and start with some new ones.
       
      Thanks
      Mike
    • hevestenning
      Hi Donna, Thanks for asking the Azalea Group. The problem may be that they are well watered” as you say. The one thing that azaleas don t like is wet
      Message 279 of 279 , Feb 5
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Donna,

        Thanks for asking the Azalea Group.

        The problem may be that they are "well watered” as you say.  The one thing that azaleas don't like is wet roots.  The containers need to have drainage in the bottom.  They also need to dry out a little between waterings.  They would much rather be stressed by being dry than being too wet, so always err on the dry side.  You may need to dig down into the soil with your finger to check on the moisture.


        Also, "well watered” is a pun in that the well water in Colorado may be alkaline.  It is always best to use cistern water (rain water) if you are not sure of the pH of your tap water.  This should sow up first as chlorosis, the yellowing of the leaves but with green veins.  Without chlorosis, this is probably not the problem.

        The problem may also be that the soil may be getting too dense.  A good soil has organic matter in it, but organic matter has a way of decomposing into inorganic matter.  When this happens it is best to repot with new soil.  I would always do this when the plant is at its most dormant period. Also, never let the roots dry out.  A dry root is a dead root.  If you repot, keep the roots misted during the change.

        Another possibility is that there may have been too much fertilizer.  Azaleas don’t need much fertilizing.  In the garden, they can get enough from the mulch layer that is constantly being applied and slowly decomposing.


        Steve Henning,

        Zone 6, Reading, PA  USA


        This message was also sent to Donna by email.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.