Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [AZ] ponticum possibilities in the South? (ponticum as a pest in UK)

Expand Messages
  • Wprzypek@aol.com
    I just wanted to mention that a form of Scotch Broom is seen along roadways here in south eastern Va. may not be invasive here as in the West but I notice that
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 4, 2006
      I just wanted to mention that a form of Scotch Broom is seen along roadways here in south eastern Va. may not be invasive here as in the West but I notice that the highway dept. removes it from time to time but we still have it in sporadic small colonies along some roadways. It has yellow flowers, and many people mistake it for Forsythia that blooms over a month before the scotch broom does.
       
      Walt Przypek, Yorktown, VA, Zone 8A
       
       
      >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
      In a message dated 4/4/06 11:15:50 AM Eastern Daylight Time, rhodyman@... writes:
      Meanwhile, the naturalized hillsides they haven't
      saved from the ravages of ponticum are beautiful in the spring to
      those who don't know better.  Sort of like Scotch broom in the West
      Coast is beautiful to those of us from the East who don't have to do
      battle with it.
       
    • Mike Creel
      Start observing old home sites to see what plants survive past habitation and even spread. You see many bulb plants oarticularly daffodils, jonquils, a red
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 4, 2006
        Start observing old home sites to see what plants
        survive past habitation and even spread. You see many
        bulb plants oarticularly daffodils, jonquils, a red
        gladiolia like plant, a gladiolii the is orangish
        spotted and most recently I have found a perennial and
        spreading gladiolii (white) that took some effort to
        remove all the seedlings or bulblets from one bed I
        had stuck the original plant into. Paulowonia trees
        are a real pest, as can be elagnus (atumn olive),
        pyranantha and nandina, of course Ivey.

        In the clay soils of the SC lower piedmont in
        Fairfield county I have noticed some large areas of a
        yellow flowered scotch broom and the Formosa Lily,
        which volunteers around my yard but is obvioius and
        esay to remove. The native spiderwort (Tradescantia)
        is another matter
        Mike Creel, SC

        --- Wprzypek@... wrote:

        >
        > I just wanted to mention that a form of Scotch Broom
        > is seen along roadways
        > here in south eastern Va. may not be invasive here
        > as in the West but I notice
        > that the highway dept. removes it from time to time
        > but we still have it in
        > sporadic small colonies along some roadways. It has
        > yellow flowers, and many
        > people mistake it for Forsythia that blooms over a
        > month before the scotch
        > broom does.
        >
        > Walt Przypek, Yorktown, VA, Zone 8A
        >
        >
        >
        >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
        > In a message dated 4/4/06 11:15:50 AM Eastern
        > Daylight Time,
        > rhodyman@... writes:
        >
        > Meanwhile, the naturalized hillsides they haven't
        > saved from the ravages of ponticum are beautiful in
        > the spring to
        > those who don't know better. Sort of like Scotch
        > broom in the West
        > Coast is beautiful to those of us from the East who
        > don't have to do
        > battle with it.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • Barry Sperling
        Hi All, Both of my Daysprings opened flowers today. The plants have only been in the ground for 6 years so the stats are less than for the Coral Bells which
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 4, 2006
          Hi All,
          Both of my Daysprings opened flowers today. The plants have only
          been in the ground for 6 years so the stats are less than for the Coral
          Bells which I've been watching since 1996.
          This WOULD compare with 3/16/02, the earliest so far, 4/7/04,
          4/16/03 and 4/17/05 BUT this is the first year that I've had to water in
          the early spring. No measurable precip has come since the middle of
          February (snow) and so about a week and a half ago I started watering.
          This messes up the stats/predictions based on weather, so such measures
          will have to wait until next year. I did have a good soaking last night
          (from the sky!) and maybe things will be normal from here.
          Crocus' were early this year so maybe the azalea peak will be too.
          Earlier is better as the flower may last longer...

          Barry
          10 mi S of DC
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.