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ID, direction & inbreeding

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  • uuallace
    Some species are more variable than others. The variation are not necessarily visible. When someone backcrosses a hybrid, it is only rarely to the same plant
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 2, 2006
      Some species are more variable than others. The variation are not
      necessarily visible. When someone backcrosses a hybrid, it is only
      rarely to the same plant This extra variablity I feel masks the
      difference between direction. The link shows Mules (Ass x Horse)
      and Hinnies (Horse x Ass).
      While corn (Tripsacum dactyloides x Zea, etc. & c.)is a true
      mongrel Seed corn, for millenia, has been produced by crossing
      strains extremely inbred for many generations.
      The only inbreeding in Azaleas seems to be an occcasional
      selfing. It woulld be nice if someone selfed R. luteum Golden Comet
      for several generation. Then you would get consistantly uniform
      offspring. Then a diference in direction would be noticable.
      I bought a dog that has only three dogs in the third generation of
      her pedigree. If I breed her I know what I am going to get. Molly
      is Canis aquatica minor L. A Poodle that many Americans would not
      recognize. The colors are the same as a Model T*.
      I am dying to try this out. I don't know if it applies to
      Azaleas. Yellow may be alcohol soluble. Removing yellow may reveal
      pink or white.
      Alas, the point of time for inbreeding is gone. Tissue culture
      will be producing haploid plants, then doubling. Complete
      uniformity, no recessives. What you see is what you get.

      *Ken can read that as Model S, a mirror image.

      http://www.imh.org/imh/bw/mule.html
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