Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [AZ] Largest propagation dome yet

Expand Messages
  • Joe Schild
    Mike, Why not construct a Nearing Frame that will handle nearly one thousand cuttings? It seems you are going large any way. Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 4, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Mike,
      Why not construct a Nearing Frame that will handle nearly one thousand cuttings? It seems you are going large any way.
       
      Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
      Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: 2/4/06 12:31:56 PM
      Subject: [AZ] Largest propagation dome yet

      Well, I keep upsizing my various cuttings and the
      clear or translucent plastic domes I use to hold the
      humidity it.  After visiting the pharmacy for my
      glaucoma drops and insulin, I stopped by K-mart today
      to seek electric hair clippers to keep my new crew
      cut.  I didn't find clippers.

      BUT I did find what will be my largest propagation
      dome to date, a deep rectangular clear storage box
      with 29 gallon capacity for less than $8.  I know of
      NO pot large enough to use it inside, so I will just
      stick large cuttings into a shaded ground bed and
      secure the "dome" to the ground  OR put several open
      pots of cuttings inside of it like a little house. 

      Now I need to carefully drill three vent holes in the
      top (originally bottom) and reseal them with probably
      clear waterproof tape that can be removed.  I think
      that three holes of 2 inches or less would do the
      trick.  I will need to predrill a small hole before
      using the holesaw and possibly tape the area first to
      prevent plastic splitting. 

      I don't expect anybody to try what I am doing. I am
      just sharing stuff as the propagation saga unfolds and
      chatter was getting slow.  This 29 gallon pot would
      properly cover two humongous azalea cuttings.


      Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
      Nature is my Greenhouse
      Join the Azalea Society of America
      http://www.azaleas.org

      __________________________________________________
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
      http://mail.yahoo.com
    • Mike Creel
      I don t think a Nearing Frame will hold the humidity close to the cuttings like my typical smaller dome-pots do. While a Nearing Fram does provide good winter
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 5, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        I don't think a Nearing Frame will hold the humidity
        close to the cuttings like my typical smaller
        dome-pots do. While a Nearing Fram does provide good
        winter protection, which I don't need down here. My
        favorite dome pots are a plastic pot about 2 galllons
        in size with half of a 3 liter drink bottle as the
        dome, and a drilled hanging basket - medium to large -
        with a gallon spring water bottle as the dome.
        Mike Creel

        --- Joe Schild <azaleajoe@...> wrote:

        > Mike,
        > Why not construct a Nearing Frame that will handle
        > nearly one thousand cuttings? It seems you are going
        > large any way.
        >
        > Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
        > Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
        > http://www.azaleas.org
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Mike Creel
        > To: ASA Azaleaphiles
        > Sent: 2/4/06 12:31:56 PM
        > Subject: [AZ] Largest propagation dome yet
        >
        >
        > Well, I keep upsizing my various cuttings and the
        > clear or translucent plastic domes I use to hold the
        > humidity it. After visiting the pharmacy for my
        > glaucoma drops and insulin, I stopped by K-mart
        > today
        > to seek electric hair clippers to keep my new crew
        > cut. I didn't find clippers.
        >
        > BUT I did find what will be my largest propagation
        > dome to date, a deep rectangular clear storage box
        > with 29 gallon capacity for less than $8. I know of
        > NO pot large enough to use it inside, so I will just
        > stick large cuttings into a shaded ground bed and
        > secure the "dome" to the ground OR put several open
        > pots of cuttings inside of it like a little house.
        >
        > Now I need to carefully drill three vent holes in
        > the
        > top (originally bottom) and reseal them with
        > probably
        > clear waterproof tape that can be removed. I think
        > that three holes of 2 inches or less would do the
        > trick. I will need to predrill a small hole before
        > using the holesaw and possibly tape the area first
        > to
        > prevent plastic splitting.
        >
        > I don't expect anybody to try what I am doing. I am
        > just sharing stuff as the propagation saga unfolds
        > and
        > chatter was getting slow. This 29 gallon pot would
        > properly cover two humongous azalea cuttings.
        >
        >
        > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
        > Nature is my Greenhouse
        > Join the Azalea Society of America
        > http://www.azaleas.org
        >
        > __________________________________________________
        > Do You Yahoo!?
        > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
        > protection around
        > http://mail.yahoo.com
        >
        >
        > When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
        > relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the
        > rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
        > And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
        > zone.
        >
        > We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB
        > in size - 640 x 480 pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40
        > compression are ideal. By attaching them you agree
        > that, without giving up your rights to them, they
        > may be shown on Azalea Society websites.
        >
        > To unsubscribe, send an email to:
        > azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > SPONSORED LINKS Azalea florist Azalea mortgage
        > Azalea plant
        > Azalea inn Azalea Azalea shoes
        >
        >
        >
        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >
        > Visit your group "azaleas" on the web.
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
        > Terms of Service.


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • John R Mackenroth
        Mike, I used plastic storage containers to root cuttings a few year sago. What worked for me was to place a number of gallon containers with cuttings into the
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 5, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Mike,
          I used plastic storage containers to root cuttings a few year sago.
          What worked for me was to place a number of gallon containers with
          cuttings into the container, close it up and forgetaboutit. I also has
          success with flats of cuttings. I rooted soft evergreens and did nothing
          special for drainage or ventilization. I think this is the best way to
          go for rooting a few hundred cuttings.

          John Mackenroth
          Somers Point, NJ zone 7a

          On Sat, 4 Feb 2006 09:31:36 -0800 (PST) Mike Creel <mikeacreel@...>
          writes:>
          > ...........I did find what will be my largest propagation
          > dome to date, a deep rectangular clear storage box
          > with 29 gallon capacity for less than $8. I know of
          > NO pot large enough to use it inside, so I will just
          > stick large cuttings into a shaded ground bed and
          > secure the "dome" to the ground OR put several open
          > pots of cuttings inside of it like a little house.
          >
          > Now I need to carefully drill three vent holes in the
          > top (originally bottom) and reseal them with probably
          > clear waterproof tape that can be removed. I think
          > that three holes of 2 inches or less would do the
          > trick. I will need to predrill a small hole before
          > using the holesaw and possibly tape the area first to
          > prevent plastic splitting.
          >
          > I don't expect anybody to try what I am doing. I am
          > just sharing stuff as the propagation saga unfolds and
          > chatter was getting slow. This 29 gallon pot would
          > properly cover two humongous azalea cuttings.
          >
          >
          > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
          > Nature is my Greenhouse
        • Mike Creel
          What media, lighting and climate controls did you use? I would think that a closed system as you describe would be bound to have problems. I do ALL my cutting
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 5, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            What media, lighting and climate controls did you use?
            I would think that a closed system as you describe
            would be bound to have problems. I do ALL my cutting
            and seed propagation outdoors, exposed to the elements
            except for a shade cloth over my dome pots, which
            collect incoming water around the pot-dome rim and
            drain it off quickly via sides and bottom. I can
            stick out a pot right now with a gallon dome covering
            20 or so deciduous azalea cuttings and pretty much let
            them to their thing until late spring or early summer
            when I remove the vent cap on the dome and move the
            pot into sun out from under the shade cloth.

            Thanks for the idea.
            Mike Creel

            --- John R Mackenroth <jrm1213@...> wrote:

            > Mike,
            > I used plastic storage containers to root
            > cuttings a few year sago.
            > What worked for me was to place a number of gallon
            > containers with
            > cuttings into the container, close it up and
            > forgetaboutit. I also has
            > success with flats of cuttings. I rooted soft
            > evergreens and did nothing
            > special for drainage or ventilization. I think this
            > is the best way to
            > go for rooting a few hundred cuttings.
            >
            > John Mackenroth
            > Somers Point, NJ zone 7a
            >
            > On Sat, 4 Feb 2006 09:31:36 -0800 (PST) Mike Creel
            > <mikeacreel@...>
            > writes:>
            > > ...........I did find what will be my largest
            > propagation
            > > dome to date, a deep rectangular clear storage box
            > > with 29 gallon capacity for less than $8. I know
            > of
            > > NO pot large enough to use it inside, so I will
            > just
            > > stick large cuttings into a shaded ground bed and
            > > secure the "dome" to the ground OR put several
            > open
            > > pots of cuttings inside of it like a little house.
            >
            > >
            > > Now I need to carefully drill three vent holes in
            > the
            > > top (originally bottom) and reseal them with
            > probably
            > > clear waterproof tape that can be removed. I
            > think
            > > that three holes of 2 inches or less would do the
            > > trick. I will need to predrill a small hole
            > before
            > > using the holesaw and possibly tape the area first
            > to
            > > prevent plastic splitting.
            > >
            > > I don't expect anybody to try what I am doing. I
            > am
            > > just sharing stuff as the propagation saga unfolds
            > and
            > > chatter was getting slow. This 29 gallon pot
            > would
            > > properly cover two humongous azalea cuttings.
            > >
            > >
            > > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
            > > Nature is my Greenhouse
            >


            __________________________________________________
            Do You Yahoo!?
            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            http://mail.yahoo.com
          • Tadeusz Dauksza
            Mike; Have you tried going to Lowe s and checking there for Plastic Storage containers with a lid that would be used for storing things like toys,etc under
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 5, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Mike; 
               
               Have you tried going to Lowe's and checking there for Plastic Storage containers with a lid that would be used for storing things like toys,etc under kids bunk beds, or for storing shoes, etc;  I seem to recollect that Dr.Mark Konrad from the Great Lakes Chapter wrote a nice article in the ARS Journal in regards to using these types of storage containers in propagation, and storage of seedlings and cuttings.
               
              Another method that might be useful is making a Glenn Dale propagating case-- this case in enclosed 2 1/2 by 6 ft and 3 1/2 feet tall according to David Leach's Rhododendron Of the World --- Two large doors provide easy access and good ventilation if so desired.    According to late David Leach the device can be built from plans provided in a leaflet entitled ' Plant Propagation Under Flourescent Light' (November 1945), issued by United States Dept of Agriculture , Agricultural Research Administration, Bureau of Plant Industry, Beltsville, Maryland.   Somehow I think that our godfather of those wonderful Glenn Dales had some input in makingf  of  this frame. 
                                  
               
              later Tadeusz- Illinois.

              Mike Creel <mikeacreel@...> wrote:
              What media, lighting and climate controls did you use?
              I would think that a closed system as you describe
              would be bound to have problems. I do ALL my cutting
              and seed propagation outdoors, exposed to the elements
              except for a shade cloth over my dome pots, which
              collect incoming water around the pot-dome rim and
              drain it off quickly via sides and bottom.  I can
              stick out a pot right now with a gallon dome covering
              20 or so deciduous azalea cuttings and pretty much let
              them to their thing until late spring or early summer
              when I remove the vent cap on the dome and move the
              pot into sun out from under the shade cloth.

              Thanks for the idea.
              Mike Creel

              --- John R Mackenroth <jrm1213@...> wrote:

              > Mike,
              >     I used plastic storage containers to root
              > cuttings a few year sago.
              > What worked for me was to place a number of gallon
              > containers with
              > cuttings into the container, close it up and
              > forgetaboutit.  I also has
              > success with flats of cuttings.  I rooted soft
              > evergreens and did nothing
              > special for drainage or ventilization.  I think this
              > is the best way to
              > go for rooting a few hundred cuttings.
              >
              > John Mackenroth
              > Somers Point, NJ  zone 7a
              >
              > On Sat, 4 Feb 2006 09:31:36 -0800 (PST) Mike Creel
              > <mikeacreel@...>
              > writes:>
              > > ...........I did find what will be my largest
              > propagation
              > > dome to date, a deep rectangular clear storage box
              > > with 29 gallon capacity for less than $8.  I know
              > of
              > > NO pot large enough to use it inside, so I will
              > just
              > > stick large cuttings into a shaded ground bed and
              > > secure the "dome" to the ground  OR put several
              > open
              > > pots of cuttings inside of it like a little house.

              > >
              > > Now I need to carefully drill three vent holes in
              > the
              > > top (originally bottom) and reseal them with
              > probably
              > > clear waterproof tape that can be removed.  I
              > think
              > > that three holes of 2 inches or less would do the
              > > trick.  I will need to predrill a small hole
              > before
              > > using the holesaw and possibly tape the area first
              > to
              > > prevent plastic splitting. 
              > >
              > > I don't expect anybody to try what I am doing. I
              > am
              > > just sharing stuff as the propagation saga unfolds
              > and
              > > chatter was getting slow.  This 29 gallon pot
              > would
              > > properly cover two humongous azalea cuttings.
              > >
              > >
              > > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
              > > Nature is my Greenhouse
              >


              __________________________________________________
              Do You Yahoo!?
              Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
              http://mail.yahoo.com


              Brings words and photos together (easily) with
              PhotoMail - it's free and works with Yahoo! Mail.

            • Joe Schild
              Mike, The rooting program John described is a simple sweat box and has been used for many years on both small and large scale propagation without problems.
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 5, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Mike,
                The rooting program John described is a simple 'sweat box' and has been used for many years on both small and large scale propagation without problems. Shoot, I made one out of a Styrofoam cooler and it worked great as do those I made from 5 gallon plastic buckets. As long as the media is not soaked to the absolute drenched point, no dieback or rot problems happen. As long as the humidity is maintained at a high state and the sweat box gets no direct sun, the cuttings root. That is what a Nearing frame does since the sashes are closed and sealed, not just in winter when it is cold.
                 
                Hybridizer Olin Hoslomback of Ringgold, GA, has been using the 5 gallon bucket methods for over 35 years and rooted rhodos, deciduous azaleas, and many other woody shrubs.
                 
                Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
                Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: 2/5/06 10:05:56 PM
                Subject: Re: [AZ] Largest propagation dome yet

                What media, lighting and climate controls did you use?
                I would think that a closed system as you describe
                would be bound to have problems. I do ALL my cutting
                and seed propagation outdoors, exposed to the elements
                except for a shade cloth over my dome pots, which
                collect incoming water around the pot-dome rim and
                drain it off quickly via sides and bottom.  I can
                stick out a pot right now with a gallon dome covering
                20 or so deciduous azalea cuttings and pretty much let
                them to their thing until late spring or early summer
                when I remove the vent cap on the dome and move the
                pot into sun out from under the shade cloth.

                Thanks for the idea.
                Mike Creel

                --- John R Mackenroth <jrm1213@...> wrote:

                > Mike,
                >     I used plastic storage containers to root
                > cuttings a few year sago.
                > What worked for me was to place a number of gallon
                > containers with
                > cuttings into the container, close it up and
                > forgetaboutit.  I also has
                > success with flats of cuttings.  I rooted soft
                > evergreens and did nothing
                > special for drainage or ventilization.  I think this
                > is the best way to
                > go for rooting a few hundred cuttings.
                >
                > John Mackenroth
                > Somers Point, NJ  zone 7a
                >
                > On Sat, 4 Feb 2006 09:31:36 -0800 (PST) Mike Creel
                > <mikeacreel@...>
                > writes:>
                > > ...........I did find what will be my largest
                > propagation
                > > dome to date, a deep rectangular clear storage box
                > > with 29 gallon capacity for less than $8.  I know
                > of
                > > NO pot large enough to use it inside, so I will
                > just
                > > stick large cuttings into a shaded ground bed and
                > > secure the "dome" to the ground  OR put several
                > open
                > > pots of cuttings inside of it like a little house.

                > >
                > > Now I need to carefully drill three vent holes in
                > the
                > > top (originally bottom) and reseal them with
                > probably
                > > clear waterproof tape that can be removed.  I
                > think
                > > that three holes of 2 inches or less would do the
                > > trick.  I will need to predrill a small hole
                > before
                > > using the holesaw and possibly tape the area first
                > to
                > > prevent plastic splitting. 
                > >
                > > I don't expect anybody to try what I am doing. I
                > am
                > > just sharing stuff as the propagation saga unfolds
                > and
                > > chatter was getting slow.  This 29 gallon pot
                > would
                > > properly cover two humongous azalea cuttings.
                > >
                > >
                > > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
                > > Nature is my Greenhouse
                >


                __________________________________________________
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                http://mail.yahoo.com
              • John R Mackenroth
                I have used a few different types of sweat boxes and different soil mixes, all with good success. I prefer to take cuttings in May, just after blooms have
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 6, 2006
                • 0 Attachment

                  I have used a few different types of sweat boxes and different soil mixes, all with good success.

                  I prefer to take cuttings in May, just after blooms have expired and new growth begins. I cut about one inch below the bloom, remove old foliage and bloom remnants and then stick the cutting into the propagation media and container. I will also use vegetative cuttings taken in July.

                  I have had success using a 50% peat moss, 50% perlite mix and also using straight peat. My first experience with straight peat was in the late 1970’s at Fischer Greenhouses when the price of perlite rose quickly and we tried to cut costs by reducing or eliminating perlite. We had problems at first, but found that when we reduced the frequency of our intermittent mist, cuttings rooted well.

                  The containers I have used range from gallon nursery containers to commercial bedding trays and flats that I've built to thin seedlings into. I also used a 4-foot by 6-foot tray with a polyethylene sheet suspended over it.

                  In all cases, the cuttings were placed under a group of oak trees, which provided heavy shade. No supplemental heat was supplied.

                  Last summer I only rooted a single 6-inch pot of cuttings (because of my being in transition from one residence to another). The pot was placed in a 5-gallon bucket with top.

                   

                  John Mackenroth

                  Somers Point, NJ  7a

                   
                  On Sun, 5 Feb 2006 23:59:05 -0500 "Joe Schild" <azaleajoe@...> writes:
                  Mike,
                  The rooting program John described is a simple 'sweat box' and has been used for many years on both small and large scale propagation without problems. Shoot, I made one out of a Styrofoam cooler and it worked great as do those I made from 5 gallon plastic buckets. As long as the media is not soaked to the absolute drenched point, no dieback or rot problems happen. As long as the humidity is maintained at a high state and the sweat box gets no direct sun, the cuttings root. That is what a Nearing frame does since the sashes are closed and sealed, not just in winter when it is cold.
                   
                  Hybridizer Olin Hoslomback of Ringgold, GA, has been using the 5 gallon bucket methods for over 35 years and rooted rhodos, deciduous azaleas, and many other woody shrubs.
                   
                  Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
                  Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
                   
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: 2/5/06 10:05:56 PM
                  Subject: Re: [AZ] Largest propagation dome yet

                  What media, lighting and climate controls did you use?
                  I would think that a closed system as you describe
                  would be bound to have problems. I do ALL my cutting
                  and seed propagation outdoors, exposed to the elements
                  except for a shade cloth over my dome pots, which
                  collect incoming water around the pot-dome rim and
                  drain it off quickly via sides and bottom.  I can
                  stick out a pot right now with a gallon dome covering
                  20 or so deciduous azalea cuttings and pretty much let
                  them to their thing until late spring or early summer
                  when I remove the vent cap on the dome and move the
                  pot into sun out from under the shade cloth.

                  Thanks for the idea.
                  Mike Creel

                  --- John R Mackenroth <jrm1213@...> wrote:

                  > Mike,
                  >     I used plastic storage containers to root
                  > cuttings a few year sago.
                  > What worked for me was to place a number of gallon
                  > containers with
                  > cuttings into the container, close it up and
                  > forgetaboutit.  I also has
                  > success with flats of cuttings.  I rooted soft
                  > evergreens and did nothing
                  > special for drainage or ventilization.  I think this
                  > is the best way to
                  > go for rooting a few hundred cuttings.
                  >
                  > John Mackenroth
                  > Somers Point, NJ  zone 7a
                  >
                  > On Sat, 4 Feb 2006 09:31:36 -0800 (PST) Mike Creel
                  > <mikeacreel@...>
                  > writes:>
                  > > ...........I did find what will be my largest
                  > propagation
                  > > dome to date, a deep rectangular clear storage box
                  > > with 29 gallon capacity for less than $8.  I know
                  > of
                  > > NO pot large enough to use it inside, so I will
                  > just
                  > > stick large cuttings into a shaded ground bed and
                  > > secure the "dome" to the ground  OR put several
                  > open
                  > > pots of cuttings inside of it like a little house.

                  > >
                  > > Now I need to carefully drill three vent holes in
                  > the
                  > > top (originally bottom) and reseal them with
                  > probably
                  > > clear waterproof tape that can be removed.  I
                  > think
                  > > that three holes of 2 inches or less would do the
                  > > trick.  I will need to predrill a small hole
                  > before
                  > > using the holesaw and possibly tape the area first
                  > to
                  > > prevent plastic splitting. 
                  > >
                  > > I don't expect anybody to try what I am doing. I
                  > am
                  > > just sharing stuff as the propagation saga unfolds
                  > and
                  > > chatter was getting slow.  This 29 gallon pot
                  > would
                  > > properly cover two humongous azalea cuttings.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
                  > > Nature is my Greenhouse
                  >


                  __________________________________________________
                  Do You Yahoo!?
                  Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                  http://mail.yahoo.com
                   
                • Mike Creel
                  John, thank you for your explanation of how you do soft cuttings and use sweat boxes. I will probably never try that since I have such luck with fully woody
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 7, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    John, thank you for your explanation of how you do
                    soft cuttings and use sweat boxes. I will probably
                    never try that since I have such luck with fully woody
                    cuttings 12 months a year using my dome pots. Are you
                    talking about deciduous azaleas only when you mention
                    soft cuttings. I have found my woody cuttings, which
                    I collect or people mail to me year-round, are much
                    easier to store, transport and keep viable than even
                    semi-hard cuttings. How do you handle cuttings
                    collect on scene in the wild?

                    Oh, I just got invited and agreed to conduct my
                    half-day native plant workshop in July 2005 at the
                    Cullowhee native plant conference in North Carolina.
                    I show a few slides (not PowerPoint) and the rest of
                    the workshop is actual hands-on propagation. I did
                    workshopes in 2004 and 2005 too. I carry a
                    propagation mini-lab in the trunk of my Honda Civic,
                    with live plants, media, domes, pots, drill and so on.
                    Mike Creel, Lexington, SC

                    --- John R Mackenroth <jrm1213@...> wrote:

                    > I have used a few different types of sweat boxes and
                    > different soil
                    > mixes, all with good success.
                    > I prefer to take cuttings in May, just after blooms
                    > have expired and new
                    > growth begins. I cut about one inch below the bloom,
                    > remove old foliage
                    > and bloom remnants and then stick the cutting into
                    > the propagation media
                    > and container. I will also use vegetative cuttings
                    > taken in July.
                    > I have had success using a 50% peat moss, 50%
                    > perlite mix and also using
                    > straight peat. My first experience with straight
                    > peat was in the late
                    > 1970’s at Fischer Greenhouses when the price of
                    > perlite rose quickly and
                    > we tried to cut costs by reducing or eliminating
                    > perlite. We had problems
                    > at first, but found that when we reduced the
                    > frequency of our
                    > intermittent mist, cuttings rooted well.
                    > The containers I have used range from gallon nursery
                    > containers to
                    > commercial bedding trays and flats that I've built
                    > to thin seedlings
                    > into. I also used a 4-foot by 6-foot tray with a
                    > polyethylene sheet
                    > suspended over it.
                    > In all cases, the cuttings were placed under a group
                    > of oak trees, which
                    > provided heavy shade. No supplemental heat was
                    > supplied.
                    > Last summer I only rooted a single 6-inch pot of
                    > cuttings (because of my
                    > being in transition from one residence to another).
                    > The pot was placed in
                    > a 5-gallon bucket with top.
                    >
                    > John Mackenroth
                    > Somers Point, NJ 7a
                    >

                    __________________________________________________
                    Do You Yahoo!?
                    Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                    http://mail.yahoo.com
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.