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Re: [AZ] Fine and Not-So-Fine

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  • John Smith
    Last year here in SW Virginia, just east of the Blue Ridge, we had a very wet spring and I had the worst incidence of petal blight I ve ever experienced -
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 27, 2004
      Last year here in SW Virginia, just east of the Blue Ridge, we had a very wet spring and I had the worst incidence of petal blight I've ever experienced - though not nearly as bad as Bill McDavit is describing this year.  My Delaware Valley Whites, of which I have quite a few, were devastated along with the Hardy Gardenias and several others to a lesser extent.
       
      This year the spring has been quite dry and I followed up on the tip Ed Collins passed on this group back in January.  I traveled 50 miles one way to get a gallon of Southern Ags Terraclor 400  and sprayed it twice underneath all those plants that had the problem last year. I also sprayed the DVW's and the Hardy Gardenias with Imunox. And so far no petal blight - none!!  The Delaware Valley Whites are over their peak and the Hardy Gardenias are in full bloom.  So between the dry weather, the Terraclor and the Imunox I'm thinking we may have escaped the scourge this year.  There are still a couple or three weeks left for most of the late bloomers and yesterday we had a pretty good rain so keeping fingers crossed.  Anyway, thanks Ed, I believe the Terraclor must have at least helped. 
       
      John Smith - Stuart, VA 
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2004 16:12
      Subject: [AZ] Fine and Not-So-Fine

          Our peak bloom period has come and gone........ and, the length of the
      bloom period was shortened considerably by the dreaded Petal Blight Monster.
          In late March and very early April, there were only minimum signs of the
      awful stuff, but on or about 19-20 April all heck broke loose.  As of now
      few blooms remain, and we can only look forward to what should be coming
      later.
            Except for a few
      of our (apparently immune) southern (Thornton) rhododendrons, all other
      varieties are stricken.
             Wow, we really need
      a cure for this monster!!

      Bill McDavit - Sunset Lakes, NC - Zone 8




    • rich93023
      ... a very wet spring and I had the worst incidence of petal blight I ve ever experienced - though not nearly as bad as Bill McDavit is describing this year.
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 27, 2004
        --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "John Smith" <jnofsmit@s...> wrote:
        > Last year here in SW Virginia, just east of the Blue Ridge, we had
        a very wet spring and I had the worst incidence of petal blight I've
        ever experienced - though not nearly as bad as Bill McDavit is
        describing this year. My Delaware Valley Whites, of which I have
        quite a few, were devastated along with the Hardy Gardenias and
        several others to a lesser extent.
        >
        > This year the spring has been quite dry and I followed up on the
        tip Ed Collins passed on this group back in January. I traveled 50
        miles one way to get a gallon of Southern Ags Terraclor 400 and
        sprayed it twice underneath all those plants that had the problem
        last year. I also sprayed the DVW's and the Hardy Gardenias with
        Imunox. And so far no petal blight - none!! The Delaware Valley
        Whites are over their peak and the Hardy Gardenias are in full
        bloom. So between the dry weather, the Terraclor and the Imunox I'm
        thinking we may have escaped the scourge this year. There are still
        a couple or three weeks left for most of the late bloomers and
        yesterday we had a pretty good rain so keeping fingers crossed.
        Anyway, thanks Ed, I believe the Terraclor must have at least
        helped.
        >
        > John Smith - Stuart, VA

        John,
        I remember Stuart well, a very beautiful small Blue Ridge town! I
        was born and raised in an even smaller town in your neck of the
        woods (Ferrum). My Mom still lives there, so I visit quite often,
        but (unfortunately) seldom in the azalea flowering season. I still
        have vivid memories of the native R. Calendulaceum and Nudiflorum
        that were (and hopefully still are) so abundant in the woods in that
        area. As a relative neophyte to growing azaleas, I have a question
        about petal blight: Do native species azaleas and deciduous hybrids
        suffer significantly from it, or is it primarily a problem with
        evergreen hybrids? (Fortunately, it is seldom a serious problem
        here in warm and sunny Southern California.)
        Regards,
        Rich Dodson, Ojai, CA (zone 9)
      • Mike Creel
        I live in probably the driest, droughtiest and hottest locations of South Carolina - the fall line sandhills where the coastal plain ends and piedmont begins.
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 27, 2004
          I live in probably the driest, droughtiest and hottest
          locations of South Carolina - the fall line sandhills
          where the coastal plain ends and piedmont begins. And
          I have not seen the problems here with petal blight
          and other diseases among my planted natives and
          evergreens. We also have cold spells, ice stormes and
          snow. I don't think it is because of the site or just
          luck though. I do little to no chemical fertilization,
          pesticiding, fungiciding or programmed watering.

          My plants pretty much tough it out on their own during
          drought, heat and cold, and the ones that make it are
          stronger I think due to my neglect. I do cut back
          overgrown plants though. I see very little of the
          azalea fungus problem that makes leaves fleshy (edible
          I have heard) and see little to no lichens forming.
          I think that some nurseries introduce a lot of
          problems to our gardens and that our overcare can make
          plants more susceptible to problems. All right,
          everbody take a shot.
          Mike Creel, Zone 8a Lexington, SC

          --- rich93023 <r2d2@...> wrote:
          > --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "John Smith"
          > <jnofsmit@s...> wrote:
          > > Last year here in SW Virginia, just east of the
          > Blue Ridge, we had
          > a very wet spring and I had the worst incidence of
          > petal blight I've
          > ever experienced - though not nearly as bad as Bill
          > McDavit is
          > describing this year. My Delaware Valley Whites, of
          > which I have
          > quite a few, were devastated along with the Hardy
          > Gardenias and
          > several others to a lesser extent.
          > >
          > > This year the spring has been quite dry and I
          > followed up on the
          > tip Ed Collins passed on this group back in January.
          > I traveled 50
          > miles one way to get a gallon of Southern Ags
          > Terraclor 400 and
          > sprayed it twice underneath all those plants that
          > had the problem
          > last year. I also sprayed the DVW's and the Hardy
          > Gardenias with
          > Imunox. And so far no petal blight - none!! The
          > Delaware Valley
          > Whites are over their peak and the Hardy Gardenias
          > are in full
          > bloom. So between the dry weather, the Terraclor
          > and the Imunox I'm
          > thinking we may have escaped the scourge this year.
          > There are still
          > a couple or three weeks left for most of the late
          > bloomers and
          > yesterday we had a pretty good rain so keeping
          > fingers crossed.
          > Anyway, thanks Ed, I believe the Terraclor must have
          > at least
          > helped.
          > >
          > > John Smith - Stuart, VA
          >
          > John,
          > I remember Stuart well, a very beautiful small Blue
          > Ridge town! I
          > was born and raised in an even smaller town in your
          > neck of the
          > woods (Ferrum). My Mom still lives there, so I
          > visit quite often,
          > but (unfortunately) seldom in the azalea flowering
          > season. I still
          > have vivid memories of the native R. Calendulaceum
          > and Nudiflorum
          > that were (and hopefully still are) so abundant in
          > the woods in that
          > area. As a relative neophyte to growing azaleas, I
          > have a question
          > about petal blight: Do native species azaleas and
          > deciduous hybrids
          > suffer significantly from it, or is it primarily a
          > problem with
          > evergreen hybrids? (Fortunately, it is seldom a
          > serious problem
          > here in warm and sunny Southern California.)
          > Regards,
          > Rich Dodson, Ojai, CA (zone 9)
          >
          >
          >
          >





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        • Will and Kate Ferrell
          Dear Bill, I really sympathize. What has your weather been like? Is it different than past years? In 02 & 03, I had some petal blight problem on later
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 27, 2004
            Dear Bill,
                I really sympathize.  What has your weather been like?  Is it different than past years?
                In '02 & '03, I had some petal blight problem on later blooming plants.  In '02, I was doing a lot of overhead watering as the plants were in a brand new home & the winter & spring were dry.  In '03 I had less; Immunox seemed to help.  This year there has been none at all.  My weather pattern has been similar to John Smith's:  somewhat dry with the 2 significant rains being followed by windy days.  The last rain was a slow misty one & I sprayed about 2/3s of my azaleas with Immunox. but neither sprayed nor unsprayed plants showed any sign--I conjecture the windiness of the next day was a help.
                Someone asked if petal blight affected deciduous.  My impression is that it does not affect species but does affect some hybrids.
                Since you grow 1500!, let me pose a question to you.  Most of our 'purple' azaleas are really magenta...with more red in them & less blue than true purple.  What is the bluest purple in your experience?  (Kuisianum is my bluest  'purple' with Purple Splendor a close second.)
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2004 4:12 PM
            Subject: [AZ] Fine and Not-So-Fine

                Our peak bloom period has come and gone........ and, the length of the
            bloom period was shortened considerably by the dreaded Petal Blight Monster.
                In late March and very early April, there were only minimum signs of the
            awful stuff, but on or about 19-20 April all heck broke loose.  As of now
            few blooms remain, and we can only look forward to what should be coming
            later.
                As a one-man-band, I have enough problems just attending my annual
            garden maintenance requirements, but with 1500 azaleas in the ground, I
            can't keep up with the Bayleton control.  After awhile, I get very
            discouraged and just live with the scourge of azaleadom.  Except for a few
            of our (apparently immune) southern (Thornton) rhododendrons, all other
            varieties are stricken.
                One of our very favorite varieties, 'Pink Camellia' is affected so
            drastically, that most buds never get a chance to open.  Wow, we really need
            a cure for this monster!!

            Bill McDavit - Sunset Lakes, NC - Zone 8




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          • JOT
            bill, all, i ve been preaching this several years now,but no takers on getting help. i m like you and a know a lot of others who just can t go the bayleton
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 28, 2004
              bill, all, i've been preaching this several years now,but no takers on
              getting help. i'm like you and a know a lot of others who just can't go the
              bayleton route , simply because of their garden size.

              maybe someone will bring at the asa board meeting!

              jim thornton
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Mary & Bill McDavit" <osprey1@...>
              To: "Azalea e-mail List" <azaleas@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2004 4:12 PM
              Subject: [AZ] Fine and Not-So-Fine


              > Our peak bloom period has come and gone........ and, the length of the
              > bloom period was shortened considerably by the dreaded Petal Blight
              Monster.
              > In late March and very early April, there were only minimum signs of
              the
              > awful stuff, but on or about 19-20 April all heck broke loose. As of now
              > few blooms remain, and we can only look forward to what should be coming
              > later.
              > As a one-man-band, I have enough problems just attending my annual
              > garden maintenance requirements, but with 1500 azaleas in the ground, I
              > can't keep up with the Bayleton control. After awhile, I get very
              > discouraged and just live with the scourge of azaleadom. Except for a few
              > of our (apparently immune) southern (Thornton) rhododendrons, all other
              > varieties are stricken.
              > One of our very favorite varieties, 'Pink Camellia' is affected so
              > drastically, that most buds never get a chance to open. Wow, we really
              need
              > a cure for this monster!!
              >
              > Bill McDavit - Sunset Lakes, NC - Zone 8
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > When you reply to this email, please quote its relevant part(s) only, as
              context, and delete the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
              >
              > To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Mary & Bill McDavit
              Will & Kate, Boy, you pose a real problem for me, re which is our most purple azalea, and I do know from whence you come. However, we must have 100 or more
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 28, 2004
                Will & Kate,
                 
                    Boy, you pose a real problem for me, re which is our most purple azalea, and I do know from whence you come.  However, we must have 100 or more azaleas that fall into the categories you mention, so I'll have to do a study on the subject and get back to you after the entire bloom season has consummated.
                    Please, if you wouldn't mind, conclude your messages with your name(s), specific geographical area, and hardiness zone.  This makes things easier for all of us to comment.
                 
                Bill McDavit - Sunset Lakes, NC - Zone 8
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2004 11:24 PM
                Subject: Re: [AZ] Fine and Not-So-Fine

                Dear Bill,
                    I really sympathize.  What has your weather been like?  Is it different than past years?
                    In '02 & '03, I had some petal blight problem on later blooming plants.  In '02, I was doing a lot of overhead watering as the plants were in a brand new home & the winter & spring were dry.  In '03 I had less; Immunox seemed to help.  This year there has been none at all.  My weather pattern has been similar to John Smith's:  somewhat dry with the 2 significant rains being followed by windy days.  The last rain was a slow misty one & I sprayed about 2/3s of my azaleas with Immunox. but neither sprayed nor unsprayed plants showed any sign--I conjecture the windiness of the next day was a help.
                    Someone asked if petal blight affected deciduous.  My impression is that it does not affect species but does affect some hybrids.
                    Since you grow 1500!, let me pose a question to you.  Most of our 'purple' azaleas are really magenta...with more red in them & less blue than true purple.  What is the bluest purple in your experience?  (Kuisianum is my bluest  'purple' with Purple Splendor a close second.)
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2004 4:12 PM
                Subject: [AZ] Fine and Not-So-Fine

                    Our peak bloom period has come and gone........ and, the length of the
                bloom period was shortened considerably by the dreaded Petal Blight Monster.
                    In late March and very early April, there were only minimum signs of the
                awful stuff, but on or about 19-20 April all heck broke loose.  As of now
                few blooms remain, and we can only look forward to what should be coming
                later.
                    As a one-man-band, I have enough problems just attending my annual
                garden maintenance requirements, but with 1500 azaleas in the ground, I
                can't keep up with the Bayleton control.  After awhile, I get very
                discouraged and just live with the scourge of azaleadom.  Except for a few
                of our (apparently immune) southern (Thornton) rhododendrons, all other
                varieties are stricken.
                    One of our very favorite varieties, 'Pink Camellia' is affected so
                drastically, that most buds never get a chance to open.  Wow, we really need
                a cure for this monster!!

                Bill McDavit - Sunset Lakes, NC - Zone 8




                When you reply to this email, please quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and delete the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.

                To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com





                When you reply to this email, please quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and delete the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.

                To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



              • Will and Kate Ferrell
                Mike, Being in a relatively dry locaton problably helps you minimize petal blight. What significance do you attach to not observing lichen formation? I ve
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 29, 2004
                  Mike,
                      Being in a relatively dry locaton problably  helps you minimize petal blight.
                      What significance do you attach to not observing lichen formation?  I've heard that lichen on a deciduous azalea suggests a declining plant, but I've seen some happy-looking ones that had it.
                   
                  Will Ferrell, Kernersville, NC 7a
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2004 9:37 PM
                  Subject: Re: [AZ] Fine and Not-So-Fine

                  I live in probably the driest, droughtiest and hottest
                  locations of South Carolina - the fall line sandhills
                  where the coastal plain ends and piedmont begins.  And
                  I have not seen the problems here with petal blight
                  and other diseases among my planted natives and
                  evergreens.  We also have cold spells, ice stormes and
                  snow.  I don't think it is because of the site or just
                  luck though. I do little to no chemical fertilization,
                  pesticiding, fungiciding or programmed watering. 

                  My plants pretty much tough it out on their own during
                  drought, heat and cold, and the ones that make it are
                  stronger I think due to my neglect.  I do cut back
                  overgrown plants though.  I see very little of the
                  azalea fungus problem that makes leaves fleshy (edible
                  I have heard) and see little to no lichens forming. 
                  I think that some nurseries introduce a lot of
                  problems to our gardens and that our overcare can make
                  plants more susceptible to problems.  All right,
                  everbody take a shot.
                  Mike Creel, Zone 8a Lexington, SC

                  --- rich93023 <r2d2@...> wrote:
                  > --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "John Smith"
                  > <jnofsmit@s...> wrote:
                  > > Last year here in SW Virginia, just east of the
                  > Blue Ridge, we had
                  > a very wet spring and I had the worst incidence of
                  > petal blight I've
                  > ever experienced - though not nearly as bad as Bill
                  > McDavit is
                  > describing this year.  My Delaware Valley Whites, of
                  > which I have
                  > quite a few, were devastated along with the Hardy
                  > Gardenias and
                  > several others to a lesser extent.
                  > >
                  > > This year the spring has been quite dry and I
                  > followed up on the
                  > tip Ed Collins passed on this group back in January.
                  >  I traveled 50
                  > miles one way to get a gallon of Southern Ags
                  > Terraclor 400  and
                  > sprayed it twice underneath all those plants that
                  > had the problem
                  > last year. I also sprayed the DVW's and the Hardy
                  > Gardenias with
                  > Imunox. And so far no petal blight - none!!  The
                  > Delaware Valley
                  > Whites are over their peak and the Hardy Gardenias
                  > are in full
                  > bloom.  So between the dry weather, the Terraclor
                  > and the Imunox I'm
                  > thinking we may have escaped the scourge this year.
                  > There are still
                  > a couple or three weeks left for most of the late
                  > bloomers and
                  > yesterday we had a pretty good rain so keeping
                  > fingers crossed. 
                  > Anyway, thanks Ed, I believe the Terraclor must have
                  > at least
                  > helped.
                  > >
                  > > John Smith - Stuart, VA
                  >
                  > John,
                  > I remember Stuart well, a very beautiful small Blue
                  > Ridge town!  I
                  > was born and raised in an even smaller town in your
                  > neck of the
                  > woods (Ferrum).  My Mom still lives there, so I
                  > visit quite often,
                  > but (unfortunately) seldom in the azalea flowering
                  > season. I still
                  > have vivid memories of the native R. Calendulaceum
                  > and Nudiflorum
                  > that were (and hopefully still are) so abundant in
                  > the woods in that
                  > area.  As a relative neophyte to growing azaleas, I
                  > have a question
                  > about petal blight: Do native species azaleas and
                  > deciduous hybrids
                  > suffer significantly from it, or is it primarily a
                  > problem with
                  > evergreen hybrids?  (Fortunately, it is seldom a
                  > serious problem
                  > here in warm and sunny Southern California.)
                  > Regards,
                  > Rich Dodson, Ojai, CA  (zone 9)

                  >
                  >
                  >



                       
                             
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                • Mike Creel
                  The few times I have seen heavy lichen formation on azaleas has been with older plants in nurseries, that have been neglected, not repotted, trimmed, many pot
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 30, 2004
                    The few times I have seen heavy lichen formation on
                    azaleas has been with older plants in nurseries, that
                    have been neglected, not repotted, trimmed, many pot
                    bound. It may be related to overwatering or some
                    nursery regimen I do not take advantage of. I think
                    that such plants if repotted and trimmed back hard
                    would revive.
                    --- Will and Kate Ferrell <bearrun3@...>
                    wrote:
                    > Mike,
                    > Being in a relatively dry locaton problably
                    > helps you minimize petal blight.
                    > What significance do you attach to not observing
                    > lichen formation? I've heard that lichen on a
                    > deciduous azalea suggests a declining plant, but
                    > I've seen some happy-looking ones that had it.
                    >
                    > Will Ferrell, Kernersville, NC 7a
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: Mike Creel
                    > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2004 9:37 PM
                    > Subject: Re: [AZ] Fine and Not-So-Fine
                    >
                    >
                    > I live in probably the driest, droughtiest and
                    > hottest
                    > locations of South Carolina - the fall line
                    > sandhills
                    > where the coastal plain ends and piedmont begins.
                    > And
                    > I have not seen the problems here with petal
                    > blight
                    > and other diseases among my planted natives and
                    > evergreens. We also have cold spells, ice stormes
                    > and
                    > snow. I don't think it is because of the site or
                    > just
                    > luck though. I do little to no chemical
                    > fertilization,
                    > pesticiding, fungiciding or programmed watering.
                    >
                    > My plants pretty much tough it out on their own
                    > during
                    > drought, heat and cold, and the ones that make it
                    > are
                    > stronger I think due to my neglect. I do cut back
                    > overgrown plants though. I see very little of the
                    > azalea fungus problem that makes leaves fleshy
                    > (edible
                    > I have heard) and see little to no lichens
                    > forming.
                    > I think that some nurseries introduce a lot of
                    > problems to our gardens and that our overcare can
                    > make
                    > plants more susceptible to problems. All right,
                    > everbody take a shot.
                    > Mike Creel, Zone 8a Lexington, SC
                    >
                    > --- rich93023 <r2d2@...> wrote:
                    > > --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, "John Smith"
                    > > <jnofsmit@s...> wrote:
                    > > > Last year here in SW Virginia, just east of
                    > the
                    > > Blue Ridge, we had
                    > > a very wet spring and I had the worst incidence
                    > of
                    > > petal blight I've
                    > > ever experienced - though not nearly as bad as
                    > Bill
                    > > McDavit is
                    > > describing this year. My Delaware Valley
                    > Whites, of
                    > > which I have
                    > > quite a few, were devastated along with the
                    > Hardy
                    > > Gardenias and
                    > > several others to a lesser extent.
                    > > >
                    > > > This year the spring has been quite dry and I
                    > > followed up on the
                    > > tip Ed Collins passed on this group back in
                    > January.
                    > > I traveled 50
                    > > miles one way to get a gallon of Southern Ags
                    > > Terraclor 400 and
                    > > sprayed it twice underneath all those plants
                    > that
                    > > had the problem
                    > > last year. I also sprayed the DVW's and the
                    > Hardy
                    > > Gardenias with
                    > > Imunox. And so far no petal blight - none!! The
                    > > Delaware Valley
                    > > Whites are over their peak and the Hardy
                    > Gardenias
                    > > are in full
                    > > bloom. So between the dry weather, the
                    > Terraclor
                    > > and the Imunox I'm
                    > > thinking we may have escaped the scourge this
                    > year.
                    > > There are still
                    > > a couple or three weeks left for most of the
                    > late
                    > > bloomers and
                    > > yesterday we had a pretty good rain so keeping
                    > > fingers crossed.
                    > > Anyway, thanks Ed, I believe the Terraclor must
                    > have
                    > > at least
                    > > helped.
                    > > >
                    > > > John Smith - Stuart, VA
                    > >
                    > > John,
                    > > I remember Stuart well, a very beautiful small
                    > Blue
                    > > Ridge town! I
                    > > was born and raised in an even smaller town in
                    > your
                    > > neck of the
                    > > woods (Ferrum). My Mom still lives there, so I
                    > > visit quite often,
                    > > but (unfortunately) seldom in the azalea
                    > flowering
                    > > season. I still
                    > > have vivid memories of the native R.
                    > Calendulaceum
                    > > and Nudiflorum
                    > > that were (and hopefully still are) so abundant
                    > in
                    > > the woods in that
                    > > area. As a relative neophyte to growing
                    > azaleas, I
                    > > have a question
                    > > about petal blight: Do native species azaleas
                    > and
                    > > deciduous hybrids
                    > > suffer significantly from it, or is it primarily
                    > a
                    > > problem with
                    > > evergreen hybrids? (Fortunately, it is seldom a
                    > > serious problem
                    > > here in warm and sunny Southern California.)
                    > > Regards,
                    > > Rich Dodson, Ojai, CA (zone 9)
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > __________________________________
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                  • Barry Sperling
                    At last year s Rhododendron Society banquet a man asked me what my favorite azalea was. I looked down and thought for a while, then thought some more,
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 2 5:57 PM
                      At last year's Rhododendron Society banquet a man asked me what my
                      favorite azalea was. I looked down and thought for a while, then
                      thought some more, scratched my head and, by the time I looked up, the
                      wait-staff was vacuuming the dessert crumbs and I was otherwise alone.
                      I couldn't answer the question. I realized that I didn't own one that I
                      could call my favorite. The problem was that, even with "good doer"
                      lists, I wasn't completely sure what would constitute one in the first
                      place.
                      I had plants I liked a lot: Harris's Coronado has the best red I
                      know of. The Glenn Dale Prudence grows very well for me. It also
                      covers itself in flowers, which I think is one of the things that sets
                      azaleas in general above so many other types of bushes. Bicolors look
                      very good, such as the Glenn Dale Martha Hitchcock or Bob Stewart's
                      Ashley Ruth. I would want my favorite to look good in the landscape and
                      also closeup.
                      Needless to say, but I will anyway, it must be both plant and bud
                      hardy in my region ( the Middle Atlantic States ). Though I'm not
                      looking for a cactus, drought and heat tolerance would help, and bud
                      hardiness down near 0 degrees would be good, too.
                      So, I come down to at least these criteria. My Favorite would:

                      1) look good in the landscape as a foundation plant that would be a
                      focal point.
                      2) grow vigorously enough to be a foundation plant in a realistic
                      number of years.
                      3) be floriforous, covering itself densely.
                      4) look good on close inspection of the flower and truss.
                      5) be a bi- ( or tri- ? ) color.
                      6) have the darker of the colors be a strong one such as a good red
                      or purple
                      7) be a low-maintenance plant as described above.
                      8) non-azaleaphiles would say: "That looks good! Where can I get one?"
                      9) azaleaphiles would say: "That looks good! Why don't I get one?"

                      Has anyone seen my favorite azalea? Write back and let me know!

                      Barry
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