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Re: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas

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  • Jerry Wade
    Coat hangers! ... From: Mike Creel To: ASA Azaleaphiles Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:49 PM Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas I love to reuse
    Message 1 of 15 , Dec 9, 2005
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      Coat hangers!
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:49 PM
      Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas

      I love to reuse and recycle household items in
      horticulture.  And I am trying to come up some some
      commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a hold-down
      clip for doing simple limb layering propagation of my
      native azaleas. Today in the yard while going to pick
      up the mail I noticed a goodly number of "wannabe"
      layers that just needed something to hold them snugly
      to the ground.  I know everybody uses bricks, but I
      want something smaller and less conspicuous like an
      extra-long staple.  I am toying with the idea of
      cutting off some metal shower curtain holders. But
      there has to be something (in multiples) just laying
      around to make "plant staples" out of.  I would
      appreciate any and all suggestions.  Hmm, some heavy
      scrap wire might work.....


      Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
      The Azalea Nut Not-Inc.
      Join the Azalea Society of America
      http://www.azaleas.org

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    • Bob Kelly
      Mike, I have for years used pieces cut from wire coat hangers. I cut them so that I have a U with the two ends about 4 - 5 inches long to stick in the
      Message 2 of 15 , Dec 9, 2005
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        Mike,
         
        I have for years used pieces cut from wire coat hangers.  I cut them so that I have  a U with the two ends about 4 - 5 inches long to stick in the ground.  I stick this all the way into the ground and it works great.
         
        Bob Kelly
        Aberdeen,MS
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 2:49 PM
        Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas

        I love to reuse and recycle household items in
        horticulture.  And I am trying to come up some some
        commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a hold-down
        clip for doing simple limb layering propagation of my
        native azaleas. Today in the yard while going to pick
        up the mail I noticed a goodly number of "wannabe"
        layers that just needed something to hold them snugly
        to the ground.  I know everybody uses bricks, but I
        want something smaller and less conspicuous like an
        extra-long staple.  I am toying with the idea of
        cutting off some metal shower curtain holders. But
        there has to be something (in multiples) just laying
        around to make "plant staples" out of.  I would
        appreciate any and all suggestions.  Hmm, some heavy
        scrap wire might work.....


        Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
        The Azalea Nut Not-Inc.
        Join the Azalea Society of America
        http://www.azaleas.org

        __________________________________________________
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        Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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      • Mike Creel
        Thank you all for your ideas for making a plant staple. I like the forked stick proposed by Paul in chilly Indiana. I can find plenty of those on sapling
        Message 3 of 15 , Dec 9, 2005
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          Thank you all for your ideas for making a plant
          staple. I like the forked stick proposed by Paul in
          chilly Indiana. I can find plenty of those on sapling
          hickories in my woods and also use scraps from
          pruning. I think that one longer leg on the fork and
          one short leg would work great so you only have to
          push one stick deep into the ground.
          Mike Creel, SC

          --- "Lightfoot, Paul" <pllightfo@...> wrote:

          > Or how about just picking a forked stick and using
          > it as a hold-down.
          > That way if you forget about it, you won't have a
          > piece of metal to get
          > in a foot or a tire. It should last long enough for
          > rooting!
          > Paul Lightfoot
          > Zone 5b with 7 or so inches of snow last night!
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          > [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          > Of Mike Creel
          > Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:50 PM
          > To: ASA Azaleaphiles
          > Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas
          >
          > I love to reuse and recycle household items in
          > horticulture. And I am trying to come up some some
          > commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a hold-down
          > clip for doing simple limb layering propagation of
          > my
          > native azaleas. Today in the yard while going to
          > pick
          > up the mail I noticed a goodly number of "wannabe"
          > layers that just needed something to hold them
          > snugly
          > to the ground. I know everybody uses bricks, but I
          > want something smaller and less conspicuous like an
          > extra-long staple. I am toying with the idea of
          > cutting off some metal shower curtain holders. But
          > there has to be something (in multiples) just laying
          > around to make "plant staples" out of. I would
          > appreciate any and all suggestions. Hmm, some heavy
          > scrap wire might work.....
          >
          >
          > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
          > The Azalea Nut Not-Inc.
          > Join the Azalea Society of America
          > http://www.azaleas.org
          >
          > __________________________________________________
          > Do You Yahoo!?
          > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
          > protection around
          > http://mail.yahoo.com
          >
          >
          >
          > When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
          > relevant part(s) only, as
          > context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line
          > and the Yahoo lines.
          > And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
          > zone.
          >
          > We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB
          > in size - 640 x 480
          > pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are
          > ideal. By attaching
          > them you agree that, without giving up your rights
          > to them, they may be
          > shown on Azalea Society websites.
          >
          > To unsubscribe, send an email to:
          > azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
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          >
          >
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          >


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        • sjperk5
          Mike and Paul Here in New Hampshire your chances of gets a forked branch in the ground approach zero. All you have to do here to get a bucket of rocks to is
          Message 4 of 15 , Dec 9, 2005
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            Mike and Paul

            Here in New Hampshire your chances of gets a forked branch in the
            ground approach zero. All you have to do here to get a bucket of
            rocks to is turn over with a shovel two buckets of real soil.

            Paul I lived in Leo, IN for 25 years which is north of Ft Wayne and I
            have to say I am surprised to here that Upland has soil loose enough
            to push a forked stick. The clay up by us went from soup to hard pan
            in a short time although if you could get the corn fields planted the
            ground was very fertile.

            John Perkins
            Salem, NH


            --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel <mikeacreel@y...> wrote:
            >
            > Thank you all for your ideas for making a plant
            > staple. I like the forked stick proposed by Paul in
            > chilly Indiana. I can find plenty of those on sapling
            > hickories in my woods and also use scraps from
            > pruning. I think that one longer leg on the fork and
            > one short leg would work great so you only have to
            > push one stick deep into the ground.
            > Mike Creel, SC
            >
            > --- "Lightfoot, Paul" <pllightfo@t...> wrote:
            >
            > > Or how about just picking a forked stick and using
            > > it as a hold-down.
            > > That way if you forget about it, you won't have a
            > > piece of metal to get
            > > in a foot or a tire. It should last long enough for
            > > rooting!
            > > Paul Lightfoot
            > > Zone 5b with 7 or so inches of snow last night!
            > >
            > > -----Original Message-----
            > > From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
            > > [mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
            > > Of Mike Creel
            > > Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:50 PM
            > > To: ASA Azaleaphiles
            > > Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas
            > >
            > > I love to reuse and recycle household items in
            > > horticulture. And I am trying to come up some some
            > > commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a hold-down
            > > clip for doing simple limb layering propagation of
            > > my
            > > native azaleas. Today in the yard while going to
            > > pick
            > > up the mail I noticed a goodly number of "wannabe"
            > > layers that just needed something to hold them
            > > snugly
            > > to the ground. I know everybody uses bricks, but I
            > > want something smaller and less conspicuous like an
            > > extra-long staple. I am toying with the idea of
            > > cutting off some metal shower curtain holders. But
            > > there has to be something (in multiples) just laying
            > > around to make "plant staples" out of. I would
            > > appreciate any and all suggestions. Hmm, some heavy
            > > scrap wire might work.....
            > >
            > >
            > > Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
            > > The Azalea Nut Not-Inc.
            > > Join the Azalea Society of America
            > > http://www.azaleas.org
            > >
            > > __________________________________________________
            > > Do You Yahoo!?
            > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
            > > protection around
            > > http://mail.yahoo.com
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
            > > relevant part(s) only, as
            > > context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line
            > > and the Yahoo lines.
            > > And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
            > > zone.
            > >
            > > We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB
            > > in size - 640 x 480
            > > pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are
            > > ideal. By attaching
            > > them you agree that, without giving up your rights
            > > to them, they may be
            > > shown on Azalea Society websites.
            > >
            > > To unsubscribe, send an email to:
            > > azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > >
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Do You Yahoo!?
            > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            > http://mail.yahoo.com
            >
          • Barry Sperling
            Just to add a minor varient, I ve had good luck with large nails and taking a pair of pliers to bend them in a vise. This U-shaped piece is stuck into the
            Message 5 of 15 , Dec 9, 2005
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              Just to add a minor varient, I've had good luck with large nails and
              taking a pair of pliers to bend them in a vise. This U-shaped piece is
              stuck into the ground and holds well. The point to this post is that
              the larger diameter of the nails (about twice that of coathangers)
              damages the branch less (I've had the branches snap on me).
              Barry


              Mike Creel wrote:

              >Thank you all for your ideas for making a plant
              >staple. I like the forked stick proposed by Paul in
              >chilly Indiana. I can find plenty of those on sapling
              >hickories in my woods and also use scraps from
              >pruning. I think that one longer leg on the fork and
              >one short leg would work great so you only have to
              >push one stick deep into the ground.
              >Mike Creel, SC
              >
              >--- "Lightfoot, Paul" <pllightfo@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              >>Or how about just picking a forked stick and using
              >>it as a hold-down.
              >>That way if you forget about it, you won't have a
              >>piece of metal to get
              >>in a foot or a tire. It should last long enough for
              >>rooting!
              >>Paul Lightfoot
              >>Zone 5b with 7 or so inches of snow last night!
              >>
              >>-----Original Message-----
              >>From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
              >>[mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
              >>Of Mike Creel
              >>Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:50 PM
              >>To: ASA Azaleaphiles
              >>Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas
              >>
              >>I love to reuse and recycle household items in
              >>horticulture. And I am trying to come up some some
              >>commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a hold-down
              >>clip for doing simple limb layering propagation of
              >>my
              >>native azaleas. Today in the yard while going to
              >>pick
              >>up the mail I noticed a goodly number of "wannabe"
              >>layers that just needed something to hold them
              >>snugly
              >>to the ground. I know everybody uses bricks, but I
              >>want something smaller and less conspicuous like an
              >>extra-long staple. I am toying with the idea of
              >>cutting off some metal shower curtain holders. But
              >>there has to be something (in multiples) just laying
              >>around to make "plant staples" out of. I would
              >>appreciate any and all suggestions. Hmm, some heavy
              >>scrap wire might work.....
              >>
              >>
              >>Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
              >>The Azalea Nut Not-Inc.
              >>Join the Azalea Society of America
              >>http://www.azaleas.org
              >>
              >>__________________________________________________
              >>Do You Yahoo!?
              >>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
              >>protection around
              >>http://mail.yahoo.com
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
              >>relevant part(s) only, as
              >>context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line
              >>and the Yahoo lines.
              >>And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
              >>zone.
              >>
              >>We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB
              >>in size - 640 x 480
              >>pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are
              >>ideal. By attaching
              >>them you agree that, without giving up your rights
              >>to them, they may be
              >>shown on Azalea Society websites.
              >>
              >>To unsubscribe, send an email to:
              >>azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >>
              >>
              >>Yahoo! Groups Links
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >
              >
              >__________________________________________________
              >Do You Yahoo!?
              >Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
              >http://mail.yahoo.com
              >
              >
              >
              >When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines. And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA zone.
              >
              >We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching them you agree that, without giving up your rights to them, they may be shown on Azalea Society websites.
              >
              >To unsubscribe, send an email to: azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Mike Creel
              How about the large metal staples that are used to put up old time wire fences, not the chain link ones. These fence staples are sharp on both ends and plenty
              Message 6 of 15 , Dec 9, 2005
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                How about the large metal staples that are used to put
                up old time wire fences, not the chain link ones.
                These fence staples are sharp on both ends and plenty
                large in the throat for the diameter of most limbs.
                One thing though, they may not be deep enough. Is it
                best to wound the ground side of a branch for
                layering?
                Mike Creel, SC

                --- Barry Sperling <barrysperling@...>
                wrote:

                > Just to add a minor varient, I've had good luck with
                > large nails and
                > taking a pair of pliers to bend them in a vise.
                > This U-shaped piece is
                > stuck into the ground and holds well. The point to
                > this post is that
                > the larger diameter of the nails (about twice that
                > of coathangers)
                > damages the branch less (I've had the branches snap
                > on me).
                > Barry
                >
                >
                > Mike Creel wrote:
                >
                > >Thank you all for your ideas for making a plant
                > >staple. I like the forked stick proposed by Paul
                > in
                > >chilly Indiana. I can find plenty of those on
                > sapling
                > >hickories in my woods and also use scraps from
                > >pruning. I think that one longer leg on the fork
                > and
                > >one short leg would work great so you only have to
                > >push one stick deep into the ground.
                > >Mike Creel, SC
                > >
                > >--- "Lightfoot, Paul" <pllightfo@...>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >>Or how about just picking a forked stick and using
                > >>it as a hold-down.
                > >>That way if you forget about it, you won't have a
                > >>piece of metal to get
                > >>in a foot or a tire. It should last long enough
                > for
                > >>rooting!
                > >>Paul Lightfoot
                > >>Zone 5b with 7 or so inches of snow last night!
                > >>
                > >>-----Original Message-----
                > >>From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                > >>[mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                > >>Of Mike Creel
                > >>Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:50 PM
                > >>To: ASA Azaleaphiles
                > >>Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas
                > >>
                > >>I love to reuse and recycle household items in
                > >>horticulture. And I am trying to come up some
                > some
                > >>commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a
                > hold-down
                > >>clip for doing simple limb layering propagation of
                > >>my
                > >>native azaleas. Today in the yard while going to
                > >>pick
                > >>up the mail I noticed a goodly number of "wannabe"
                > >>layers that just needed something to hold them
                > >>snugly
                > >>to the ground. I know everybody uses bricks, but
                > I
                > >>want something smaller and less conspicuous like
                > an
                > >>extra-long staple. I am toying with the idea of
                > >>cutting off some metal shower curtain holders. But
                > >>there has to be something (in multiples) just
                > laying
                > >>around to make "plant staples" out of. I would
                > >>appreciate any and all suggestions. Hmm, some
                > heavy
                > >>scrap wire might work.....
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
                > >>The Azalea Nut Not-Inc.
                > >>Join the Azalea Society of America
                > >>http://www.azaleas.org
                > >>
                > >>__________________________________________________
                > >>Do You Yahoo!?
                > >>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                > >>protection around
                > >>http://mail.yahoo.com
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
                > >>relevant part(s) only, as
                > >>context, and DELETE the rest - especially this
                > line
                > >>and the Yahoo lines.
                > >>And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
                > >>zone.
                > >>
                > >>We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under
                > 100KB
                > >>in size - 640 x 480
                > >>pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are
                > >>ideal. By attaching
                > >>them you agree that, without giving up your rights
                > >>to them, they may be
                > >>shown on Azalea Society websites.
                > >>
                > >>To unsubscribe, send an email to:
                > >>azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                > >__________________________________________________
                > >Do You Yahoo!?
                > >Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                > protection around
                > >http://mail.yahoo.com
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
                > relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the
                > rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
                > And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
                > zone.
                > >
                > >We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under
                > 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel JPEG images at 50%
                > or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching them you
                > agree that, without giving up your rights to them,
                > they may be shown on Azalea Society websites.
                > >
                > >To unsubscribe, send an email to:
                > azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > >
                > >
                > >Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >


                __________________________________________________
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              • sjperk5
                Mike Where I grew up in Indiana every good adhock solution to holding something started with either an piece of old inner tube or garden hose so how about a
                Message 7 of 15 , Dec 10, 2005
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                  Mike

                  Where I grew up in Indiana every good adhock solution to holding
                  something started with either an piece of old inner tube or garden
                  hose so how about a piece of garden hose and a coat hanger?

                  John



                  --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel <mikeacreel@y...> wrote:
                  >
                  > How about the large metal staples that are used to put
                  > up old time wire fences, not the chain link ones.
                  > These fence staples are sharp on both ends and plenty
                  > large in the throat for the diameter of most limbs.
                  > One thing though, they may not be deep enough. Is it
                  > best to wound the ground side of a branch for
                  > layering?
                  > Mike Creel, SC
                  >
                  > --- Barry Sperling <barrysperling@i...>
                  > wrote:
                  >
                  > > Just to add a minor varient, I've had good luck with
                  > > large nails and
                  > > taking a pair of pliers to bend them in a vise.
                  > > This U-shaped piece is
                  > > stuck into the ground and holds well. The point to
                  > > this post is that
                  > > the larger diameter of the nails (about twice that
                  > > of coathangers)
                  > > damages the branch less (I've had the branches snap
                  > > on me).
                  > > Barry
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Mike Creel wrote:
                  > >
                  > > >Thank you all for your ideas for making a plant
                  > > >staple. I like the forked stick proposed by Paul
                  > > in
                  > > >chilly Indiana. I can find plenty of those on
                  > > sapling
                  > > >hickories in my woods and also use scraps from
                  > > >pruning. I think that one longer leg on the fork
                  > > and
                  > > >one short leg would work great so you only have to
                  > > >push one stick deep into the ground.
                  > > >Mike Creel, SC
                  > > >
                  > > >--- "Lightfoot, Paul" <pllightfo@t...>
                  > > wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >>Or how about just picking a forked stick and using
                  > > >>it as a hold-down.
                  > > >>That way if you forget about it, you won't have a
                  > > >>piece of metal to get
                  > > >>in a foot or a tire. It should last long enough
                  > > for
                  > > >>rooting!
                  > > >>Paul Lightfoot
                  > > >>Zone 5b with 7 or so inches of snow last night!
                  > > >>
                  > > >>-----Original Message-----
                  > > >>From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                  > > >>[mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  > > >>Of Mike Creel
                  > > >>Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:50 PM
                  > > >>To: ASA Azaleaphiles
                  > > >>Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas
                  > > >>
                  > > >>I love to reuse and recycle household items in
                  > > >>horticulture. And I am trying to come up some
                  > > some
                  > > >>commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a
                  > > hold-down
                  > > >>clip for doing simple limb layering propagation of
                  > > >>my
                  > > >>native azaleas. Today in the yard while going to
                  > > >>pick
                  > > >>up the mail I noticed a goodly number of "wannabe"
                  > > >>layers that just needed something to hold them
                  > > >>snugly
                  > > >>to the ground. I know everybody uses bricks, but
                  > > I
                  > > >>want something smaller and less conspicuous like
                  > > an
                  > > >>extra-long staple. I am toying with the idea of
                  > > >>cutting off some metal shower curtain holders. But
                  > > >>there has to be something (in multiples) just
                  > > laying
                  > > >>around to make "plant staples" out of. I would
                  > > >>appreciate any and all suggestions. Hmm, some
                  > > heavy
                  > > >>scrap wire might work.....
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
                  > > >>The Azalea Nut Not-Inc.
                  > > >>Join the Azalea Society of America
                  > > >>http://www.azaleas.org
                  > > >>
                  > > >>__________________________________________________
                  > > >>Do You Yahoo!?
                  > > >>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                  > > >>protection around
                  > > >>http://mail.yahoo.com
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
                  > > >>relevant part(s) only, as
                  > > >>context, and DELETE the rest - especially this
                  > > line
                  > > >>and the Yahoo lines.
                  > > >>And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
                  > > >>zone.
                  > > >>
                  > > >>We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under
                  > > 100KB
                  > > >>in size - 640 x 480
                  > > >>pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are
                  > > >>ideal. By attaching
                  > > >>them you agree that, without giving up your rights
                  > > >>to them, they may be
                  > > >>shown on Azalea Society websites.
                  > > >>
                  > > >>To unsubscribe, send an email to:
                  > > >>azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >__________________________________________________
                  > > >Do You Yahoo!?
                  > > >Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                  > > protection around
                  > > >http://mail.yahoo.com
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
                  > > relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the
                  > > rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
                  > > And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
                  > > zone.
                  > > >
                  > > >We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under
                  > > 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel JPEG images at 50%
                  > > or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching them you
                  > > agree that, without giving up your rights to them,
                  > > they may be shown on Azalea Society websites.
                  > > >
                  > > >To unsubscribe, send an email to:
                  > > azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  > > >
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                  > > >Yahoo! Groups Links
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                  > __________________________________________________
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                  >
                • Bob Kelly
                  John, Down here in MS, used to be that the common fixit item was a piece of baling wire. (That has been replaced today by WD-40 and Duct Tape: If it s
                  Message 8 of 15 , Dec 10, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    John,
                     
                    Down here in MS, used to be that the common fixit item was a piece of baling wire.  (That has been replaced today by WD-40 and Duct Tape:  If it's supposed to move and doesn't, use WD-40; if it moves when it's not supposed to, use the Duct Tape.)  Nowadays, the 'baling wire' which is available is more rigid and stiffer than the old stuff that was soft and flexible--thus if you don't have wire hangers, baling wire will do.  :o))
                     
                    Bob Kelly
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: sjperk5
                    Sent: Saturday, December 10, 2005 8:27 AM
                    Subject: Re: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas

                    Mike

                    Where I grew up in Indiana every good adhock solution to holding
                    something started with either an piece of old inner tube or garden
                    hose so how about a piece of garden hose and a coat hanger?

                    John



                    --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel <mikeacreel@y...> wrote:
                    >
                    > How about the large metal staples that are used to put
                    > up old time wire fences, not the chain link ones.
                    > These fence staples are sharp on both ends and plenty
                    > large in the throat for the diameter of most limbs.
                    > One thing though, they may not be deep enough.  Is it
                    > best to wound the ground side of a branch for
                    > layering?
                    > Mike Creel, SC
                    >
                    > --- Barry Sperling <barrysperling@i...>
                    > wrote:
                    >
                    > > Just to add a minor varient, I've had good luck with
                    > > large nails and
                    > > taking a pair of pliers to bend them in a vise.
                    > > This U-shaped piece is
                    > > stuck into the ground and holds well.  The point to
                    > > this post is that
                    > > the larger diameter of the nails (about twice that
                    > > of coathangers)
                    > > damages the branch less (I've had the branches snap
                    > > on me).
                    > >     Barry
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Mike Creel wrote:
                    > >
                    > > >Thank you all for your ideas for making a plant
                    > > >staple.  I like the forked stick proposed by Paul
                    > > in
                    > > >chilly Indiana.  I can find plenty of those on
                    > > sapling
                    > > >hickories in my woods and also use scraps from
                    > > >pruning.  I think that one longer leg on the fork
                    > > and
                    > > >one short leg would work great so you  only have to
                    > > >push one stick deep into the ground.
                    > > >Mike Creel, SC
                    > > >
                    > > >--- "Lightfoot, Paul" <pllightfo@t...>
                    > > wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > 
                    > > >
                    > > >>Or how about just picking a forked stick and using
                    > > >>it as a hold-down.
                    > > >>That way if you forget about it, you won't have a
                    > > >>piece of metal to get
                    > > >>in a foot or a tire.  It should last long enough
                    > > for
                    > > >>rooting!
                    > > >>Paul Lightfoot
                    > > >>Zone 5b with 7 or so inches of snow last night!
                    > > >>
                    > > >>-----Original Message-----
                    > > >>From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                    > > >>[mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                    > > >>Of Mike Creel
                    > > >>Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:50 PM
                    > > >>To: ASA Azaleaphiles
                    > > >>Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas
                    > > >>
                    > > >>I love to reuse and recycle household items in
                    > > >>horticulture.  And I am trying to come up some
                    > > some
                    > > >>commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a
                    > > hold-down
                    > > >>clip for doing simple limb layering propagation of
                    > > >>my
                    > > >>native azaleas. Today in the yard while going to
                    > > >>pick
                    > > >>up the mail I noticed a goodly number of "wannabe"
                    > > >>layers that just needed something to hold them
                    > > >>snugly
                    > > >>to the ground.  I know everybody uses bricks, but
                    > > I
                    > > >>want something smaller and less conspicuous like
                    > > an
                    > > >>extra-long staple.  I am toying with the idea of
                    > > >>cutting off some metal shower curtain holders. But
                    > > >>there has to be something (in multiples) just
                    > > laying
                    > > >>around to make "plant staples" out of.  I would
                    > > >>appreciate any and all suggestions.  Hmm, some
                    > > heavy
                    > > >>scrap wire might work.....
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
                    > > >>The Azalea Nut Not-Inc.
                    > > >>Join the Azalea Society of America
                    > > >>http://www.azaleas.org
                    > > >>
                    > > >>__________________________________________________
                    > > >>Do You Yahoo!?
                    > > >>Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                    > > >>protection around
                    > > >>http://mail.yahoo.com
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
                    > > >>relevant part(s) only, as
                    > > >>context, and DELETE the rest - especially this
                    > > line
                    > > >>and the Yahoo lines.
                    > > >>And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
                    > > >>zone.
                    > > >>
                    > > >>We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under
                    > > 100KB
                    > > >>in size - 640 x 480
                    > > >>pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are
                    > > >>ideal. By attaching
                    > > >>them you agree that, without giving up your rights
                    > > >>to them, they may be
                    > > >>shown on Azalea Society websites.
                    > > >>
                    > > >>To unsubscribe, send an email to:
                    > > >>azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>   
                    > > >>
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >__________________________________________________
                    > > >Do You Yahoo!?
                    > > >Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                    > > protection around
                    > > >http://mail.yahoo.com
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
                    > > relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the
                    > > rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
                    > > And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
                    > > zone.
                    > > >
                    > > >We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under
                    > > 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel JPEG images at 50%
                    > > or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching them you
                    > > agree that, without giving up your rights to them,
                    > > they may be shown on Azalea Society websites.
                    > > >
                    > > >To unsubscribe, send an email to:
                    > > azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > 
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    > __________________________________________________
                    > Do You Yahoo!?
                    > Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                    > http://mail.yahoo.com
                    >




                  • Mike Creel
                    I like the idea of using small sections of old garden hose as a cushion for a coat hanger wire plant layer hold-down. Some time back a hardware store was going
                    Message 9 of 15 , Dec 10, 2005
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I like the idea of using small sections of old garden
                      hose as a cushion for a coat hanger wire plant layer
                      hold-down. Some time back a hardware store was going
                      out of business down the road from me and I bought a
                      batch of some kind of heavy gauge, but bendable wire,
                      sold in straight pieces abour 6 feet long. I forget
                      what they called it but it works great for stuff like
                      making wire frame supports and hanging basket hangers.
                      It would also work well for plant hold-downs, using a
                      garden hose piece cushion.

                      I went by the local farm supply store (or was it
                      Lowes) earlier this year and bought a roll of electric
                      fence wire which I use to secure propagation domes to
                      pots of cuttings and wire mesh varmint caps to seed
                      pots.

                      Mike Creel, SC

                      --- sjperk5 <sjperk5@...> wrote:

                      > Mike
                      >
                      > Where I grew up in Indiana every good adhock
                      > solution to holding
                      > something started with either an piece of old inner
                      > tube or garden
                      > hose so how about a piece of garden hose and a coat
                      > hanger?
                      >
                      > John
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel
                      > <mikeacreel@y...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > How about the large metal staples that are used to
                      > put
                      > > up old time wire fences, not the chain link ones.
                      > > These fence staples are sharp on both ends and
                      > plenty
                      > > large in the throat for the diameter of most
                      > limbs.
                      > > One thing though, they may not be deep enough. Is
                      > it
                      > > best to wound the ground side of a branch for
                      > > layering?
                      > > Mike Creel, SC
                      > >
                      > > --- Barry Sperling <barrysperling@i...>
                      > > wrote:
                      > >
                      > > > Just to add a minor varient, I've had good luck
                      > with
                      > > > large nails and
                      > > > taking a pair of pliers to bend them in a vise.
                      > > > This U-shaped piece is
                      > > > stuck into the ground and holds well. The point
                      > to
                      > > > this post is that
                      > > > the larger diameter of the nails (about twice
                      > that
                      > > > of coathangers)
                      > > > damages the branch less (I've had the branches
                      > snap
                      > > > on me).
                      > > > Barry
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Mike Creel wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > >Thank you all for your ideas for making a plant
                      > > > >staple. I like the forked stick proposed by
                      > Paul
                      > > > in
                      > > > >chilly Indiana. I can find plenty of those on
                      > > > sapling
                      > > > >hickories in my woods and also use scraps from
                      > > > >pruning. I think that one longer leg on the
                      > fork
                      > > > and
                      > > > >one short leg would work great so you only
                      > have to
                      > > > >push one stick deep into the ground.
                      > > > >Mike Creel, SC
                      > > > >
                      > > > >--- "Lightfoot, Paul" <pllightfo@t...>
                      > > > wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >>Or how about just picking a forked stick and
                      > using
                      > > > >>it as a hold-down.
                      > > > >>That way if you forget about it, you won't
                      > have a
                      > > > >>piece of metal to get
                      > > > >>in a foot or a tire. It should last long
                      > enough
                      > > > for
                      > > > >>rooting!
                      > > > >>Paul Lightfoot
                      > > > >>Zone 5b with 7 or so inches of snow last
                      > night!
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>-----Original Message-----
                      > > > >>From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                      > > > >>[mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      > > > >>Of Mike Creel
                      > > > >>Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:50 PM
                      > > > >>To: ASA Azaleaphiles
                      > > > >>Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>I love to reuse and recycle household items in
                      > > > >>horticulture. And I am trying to come up some
                      > > > some
                      > > > >>commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a
                      > > > hold-down
                      > > > >>clip for doing simple limb layering
                      > propagation of
                      > > > >>my
                      > > > >>native azaleas. Today in the yard while going
                      > to
                      > > > >>pick
                      > > > >>up the mail I noticed a goodly number of
                      > "wannabe"
                      > > > >>layers that just needed something to hold them
                      > > > >>snugly
                      > > > >>to the ground. I know everybody uses bricks,
                      > but
                      > > > I
                      > > > >>want something smaller and less conspicuous
                      > like
                      > > > an
                      > > > >>extra-long staple. I am toying with the idea
                      > of
                      > > > >>cutting off some metal shower curtain holders.
                      > But
                      > > > >>there has to be something (in multiples) just
                      > > > laying
                      > > > >>around to make "plant staples" out of. I
                      > would
                      > > > >>appreciate any and all suggestions. Hmm, some
                      > > > heavy
                      > > > >>scrap wire might work.....
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
                      > > > >>The Azalea Nut Not-Inc.
                      > > > >>Join the Azalea Society of America
                      > > > >>http://www.azaleas.org
                      > > > >>
                      > > >
                      > >>__________________________________________________
                      > > > >>Do You Yahoo!?
                      > > > >>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                      > > > >>protection around
                      > > > >>http://mail.yahoo.com
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
                      > > > >>relevant part(s) only, as
                      > > > >>context, and DELETE the rest - especially this
                      > > > line
                      > > > >>and the Yahoo lines.
                      > > > >>And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or
                      > USDA
                      > > > >>zone.
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under
                      > > > 100KB
                      > > > >>in size - 640 x 480
                      > > > >>pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression
                      > are
                      > > > >>ideal. By attaching
                      > > > >>them you agree that, without giving up your
                      > rights
                      > > > >>to them, they may be
                      > > > >>shown on Azalea Society websites.
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>To unsubscribe, send an email to:
                      > > > >>azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > >__________________________________________________
                      > > > >Do You Yahoo!?
                      > > > >Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                      > > > protection around
                      > > > >http://mail.yahoo.com
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
                      > > > relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE
                      > the
                      > > > rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
                      >
                      > > > And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
                      > > > zone.
                      > > > >
                      > > > >We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under
                      > > > 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel JPEG images at
                      > 50%
                      > > > or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching them
                      > you
                      > > > agree that, without giving up your rights to
                      > them,
                      >
                      === message truncated ===


                      __________________________________________________
                      Do You Yahoo!?
                      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                      http://mail.yahoo.com
                    • Sally/John Perkins
                      Bob My brothers and I used to play two person baseball using a ball make using baling twine, slices of old inner tube, and duct tape. We made hockey pucks
                      Message 10 of 15 , Dec 10, 2005
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Bob
                         
                        My brothers and I used to play two person baseball using a ball make using baling twine, slices of old inner tube, and duct tape. We made hockey pucks using the same materials but added water and froze them.
                         
                        John Perkins
                        Salem, NH.
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Bob Kelly
                        Sent: Saturday, December 10, 2005 10:05 AM
                        Subject: Re: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas

                        John,
                         
                        Down here in MS, used to be that the common fixit item was a piece of baling wire.  (That has been replaced today by WD-40 and Duct Tape:  If it's supposed to move and doesn't, use WD-40; if it moves when it's not supposed to, use the Duct Tape.)  Nowadays, the 'baling wire' which is available is more rigid and stiffer than the old stuff that was soft and flexible--thus if you don't have wire hangers, baling wire will do.  :o))
                         
                        Bob Kelly
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: sjperk5
                        Sent: Saturday, December 10, 2005 8:27 AM
                        Subject: Re: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas

                        Mike

                        Where I grew up in Indiana every good adhock solution to holding
                        something started with either an piece of old inner tube or garden
                        hose so how about a piece of garden hose and a coat hanger?

                        John



                        --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel <mikeacreel@y...> wrote:
                        >
                        > How about the large metal staples that are used to put
                        > up old time wire fences, not the chain link ones.
                        > These fence staples are sharp on both ends and plenty
                        > large in the throat for the diameter of most limbs.
                        > One thing though, they may not be deep enough.  Is it
                        > best to wound the ground side of a branch for
                        > layering?
                        > Mike Creel, SC
                        >
                        > --- Barry Sperling <barrysperling@i...>
                        > wrote:
                        >
                        > > Just to add a minor varient, I've had good luck with
                        > > large nails and
                        > > taking a pair of pliers to bend them in a vise.
                        > > This U-shaped piece is
                        > > stuck into the ground and holds well.  The point to
                        > > this post is that
                        > > the larger diameter of the nails (about twice that
                        > > of coathangers)
                        > > damages the branch less (I've had the branches snap
                        > > on me).
                        > >     Barry
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Mike Creel wrote:
                        > >
                        > > >Thank you all for your ideas for making a plant
                        > > >staple.  I like the forked stick proposed by Paul
                        > > in
                        > > >chilly Indiana.  I can find plenty of those on
                        > > sapling
                        > > >hickories in my woods and also use scraps from
                        > > >pruning.  I think that one longer leg on the fork
                        > > and
                        > > >one short leg would work great so you  only have to
                        > > >push one stick deep into the ground.
                        > > >Mike Creel, SC
                        > > >
                        > > >--- "Lightfoot, Paul" <pllightfo@t...>
                        > > wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > 
                        > > >
                        > > >>Or how about just picking a forked stick and using
                        > > >>it as a hold-down.
                        > > >>That way if you forget about it, you won't have a
                        > > >>piece of metal to get
                        > > >>in a foot or a tire.  It should last long enough
                        > > for
                        > > >>rooting!
                        > > >>Paul Lightfoot
                        > > >>Zone 5b with 7 or so inches of snow last night!
                        > > >>
                        > > >>-----Original Message-----
                        > > >>From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                        > > >>[mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                        > > >>Of Mike Creel
                        > > >>Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:50 PM
                        > > >>To: ASA Azaleaphiles
                        > > >>Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas
                        > > >>
                        > > >>I love to reuse and recycle household items in
                        > > >>horticulture.  And I am trying to come up some
                        > > some
                        > > >>commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a
                        > > hold-down
                        > > >>clip for doing simple limb layering propagation of
                        > > >>my
                        > > >>native azaleas. Today in the yard while going to
                        > > >>pick
                        > > >>up the mail I noticed a goodly number of "wannabe"
                        > > >>layers that just needed something to hold them
                        > > >>snugly
                        > > >>to the ground.  I know everybody uses bricks, but
                        > > I
                        > > >>want something smaller and less conspicuous like
                        > > an
                        > > >>extra-long staple.  I am toying with the idea of
                        > > >>cutting off some metal shower curtain holders. But
                        > > >>there has to be something (in multiples) just
                        > > laying
                        > > >>around to make "plant staples" out of.  I would
                        > > >>appreciate any and all suggestions.  Hmm, some
                        > > heavy
                        > > >>scrap wire might work.....
                        > > >>
                        > > >>
                        > > >>Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
                        > > >>The Azalea Nut Not-Inc.
                        > > >>Join the Azalea Society of America
                        > > >>http://www.azaleas.org
                        > > >>
                        > > >>__________________________________________________
                        > > >>Do You Yahoo!?
                        > > >>Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                        > > >>protection around
                        > > >>http://mail.yahoo.com
                        > > >>
                        > > >>
                        > > >>
                        > > >>When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
                        > > >>relevant part(s) only, as
                        > > >>context, and DELETE the rest - especially this
                        > > line
                        > > >>and the Yahoo lines.
                        > > >>And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
                        > > >>zone.
                        > > >>
                        > > >>We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under
                        > > 100KB
                        > > >>in size - 640 x 480
                        > > >>pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression are
                        > > >>ideal. By attaching
                        > > >>them you agree that, without giving up your rights
                        > > >>to them, they may be
                        > > >>shown on Azalea Society websites.
                        > > >>
                        > > >>To unsubscribe, send an email to:
                        > > >>azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                        > > >>
                        > > >>
                        > > >>Yahoo! Groups Links
                        > > >>
                        > > >>
                        > > >>
                        > > >>
                        > > >>
                        > > >>
                        > > >>
                        > > >>   
                        > > >>
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >__________________________________________________
                        > > >Do You Yahoo!?
                        > > >Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                        > > protection around
                        > > >http://mail.yahoo.com
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
                        > > relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the
                        > > rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
                        > > And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
                        > > zone.
                        > > >
                        > > >We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under
                        > > 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel JPEG images at 50%
                        > > or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching them you
                        > > agree that, without giving up your rights to them,
                        > > they may be shown on Azalea Society websites.
                        > > >
                        > > >To unsubscribe, send an email to:
                        > > azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >Yahoo! Groups Links
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > 
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        > __________________________________________________
                        > Do You Yahoo!?
                        > Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                        > http://mail.yahoo.com
                        >




                      • Joe Schild
                        Mike, Here is one for you to use as a hold-down. Some time back I was putting down large sections of weed block fabric and needed something to keep it in
                        Message 11 of 15 , Dec 10, 2005
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Mike,
                          Here is one for you to use as a hold-down. Some time back I was putting down large sections of weed block fabric and needed something to keep it in place. My back neighbor offered me loads of broken hay rake times from his rake he used on his large farm. These are about 12" long, 1/4" in diameter, and have a "U" shaped top or hook. They will drive in the ground with a hammer and actually hold irrigation lines in place too, which are much better than the U-wires the irrigation store sells.
                           
                          My daughter and son-in-law have used them as tent pegs. Since you have connections with a farm store in your area, you might ask around to see if any of the farmers have left-over hay rake tines. Most farmers just toss them into the scrap pile.
                           
                          Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
                          Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
                           
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: 12/10/05 11:06:28 AM
                          Subject: Re: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas

                          I like the idea of using small sections of old garden
                          hose as a cushion for a coat hanger wire plant layer
                          hold-down. Some time back a hardware store was going
                          out of business down the road from me and I bought a
                          batch of some kind of heavy gauge, but bendable wire,
                          sold in straight pieces abour 6 feet long.  I forget
                          what they called it but it works great for stuff like
                          making wire frame supports and hanging basket hangers.
                          It would also work well for plant hold-downs, using a
                          garden hose piece cushion.

                          I went by the local farm supply store (or was it
                          Lowes) earlier this year and bought a roll of electric
                          fence wire which I use to secure propagation domes to
                          pots of cuttings and wire mesh varmint caps to seed
                          pots.

                          Mike Creel, SC

                          --- sjperk5 <sjperk5@...> wrote:

                          > Mike
                          >
                          > Where I grew up in Indiana every good adhock
                          > solution to holding
                          > something started with either an piece of old inner
                          > tube or garden
                          > hose so how about a piece of garden hose and a coat
                          > hanger?
                          >
                          > John
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel
                          > <mikeacreel@y...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > How about the large metal staples that are used to
                          > put
                          > > up old time wire fences, not the chain link ones.
                          > > These fence staples are sharp on both ends and
                          > plenty
                          > > large in the throat for the diameter of most
                          > limbs.
                          > > One thing though, they may not be deep enough.  Is
                          > it
                          > > best to wound the ground side of a branch for
                          > > layering?
                          > > Mike Creel, SC
                          > >
                          > > --- Barry Sperling <barrysperling@i...>
                          > > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > > Just to add a minor varient, I've had good luck
                          > with
                          > > > large nails and
                          > > > taking a pair of pliers to bend them in a vise.
                          > > > This U-shaped piece is
                          > > > stuck into the ground and holds well.  The point
                          > to
                          > > > this post is that
                          > > > the larger diameter of the nails (about twice
                          > that
                          > > > of coathangers)
                          > > > damages the branch less (I've had the branches
                          > snap
                          > > > on me).
                          > > >     Barry
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > Mike Creel wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > >Thank you all for your ideas for making a plant
                          > > > >staple.  I like the forked stick proposed by
                          > Paul
                          > > > in
                          > > > >chilly Indiana.  I can find plenty of those on
                          > > > sapling
                          > > > >hickories in my woods and also use scraps from
                          > > > >pruning.  I think that one longer leg on the
                          > fork
                          > > > and
                          > > > >one short leg would work great so you  only
                          > have to
                          > > > >push one stick deep into the ground.
                          > > > >Mike Creel, SC
                          > > > >
                          > > > >--- "Lightfoot, Paul" <pllightfo@t...>
                          > > > wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > 
                          > > > >
                          > > > >>Or how about just picking a forked stick and
                          > using
                          > > > >>it as a hold-down.
                          > > > >>That way if you forget about it, you won't
                          > have a
                          > > > >>piece of metal to get
                          > > > >>in a foot or a tire.  It should last long
                          > enough
                          > > > for
                          > > > >>rooting!
                          > > > >>Paul Lightfoot
                          > > > >>Zone 5b with 7 or so inches of snow last
                          > night!
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>-----Original Message-----
                          > > > >>From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                          > > > >>[mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                          > > > >>Of Mike Creel
                          > > > >>Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:50 PM
                          > > > >>To: ASA Azaleaphiles
                          > > > >>Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>I love to reuse and recycle household items in
                          > > > >>horticulture.  And I am trying to come up some
                          > > > some
                          > > > >>commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a
                          > > > hold-down
                          > > > >>clip for doing simple limb layering
                          > propagation of
                          > > > >>my
                          > > > >>native azaleas. Today in the yard while going
                          > to
                          > > > >>pick
                          > > > >>up the mail I noticed a goodly number of
                          > "wannabe"
                          > > > >>layers that just needed something to hold them
                          > > > >>snugly
                          > > > >>to the ground.  I know everybody uses bricks,
                          > but
                          > > > I
                          > > > >>want something smaller and less conspicuous
                          > like
                          > > > an
                          > > > >>extra-long staple.  I am toying with the idea
                          > of
                          > > > >>cutting off some metal shower curtain holders.
                          > But
                          > > > >>there has to be something (in multiples) just
                          > > > laying
                          > > > >>around to make "plant staples" out of.  I
                          > would
                          > > > >>appreciate any and all suggestions.  Hmm, some
                          > > > heavy
                          > > > >>scrap wire might work.....
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>Mike Creel, SC USDA Zone 8a
                          > > > >>The Azalea Nut Not-Inc.
                          > > > >>Join the Azalea Society of America
                          > > > >>http://www.azaleas.org
                          > > > >>
                          > > >
                          > >>__________________________________________________
                          > > > >>Do You Yahoo!?
                          > > > >>Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                          > > > >>protection around
                          > > > >>http://mail.yahoo.com
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
                          > > > >>relevant part(s) only, as
                          > > > >>context, and DELETE the rest - especially this
                          > > > line
                          > > > >>and the Yahoo lines.
                          > > > >>And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or
                          > USDA
                          > > > >>zone.
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under
                          > > > 100KB
                          > > > >>in size - 640 x 480
                          > > > >>pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40 compression
                          > are
                          > > > >>ideal. By attaching
                          > > > >>them you agree that, without giving up your
                          > rights
                          > > > >>to them, they may be
                          > > > >>shown on Azalea Society websites.
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>To unsubscribe, send an email to:
                          > > > >>azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>Yahoo! Groups Links
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >>   
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > >__________________________________________________
                          > > > >Do You Yahoo!?
                          > > > >Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                          > > > protection around
                          > > > >http://mail.yahoo.com
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > >When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its
                          > > > relevant part(s) only, as context, and DELETE
                          > the
                          > > > rest - especially this line and the Yahoo lines.
                          >
                          > > > And PLEASE tell us your city, state and/or USDA
                          > > > zone.
                          > > > >
                          > > > >We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under
                          > > > 100KB in size - 640 x 480 pixel JPEG images at
                          > 50%
                          > > > or 1:40 compression are ideal. By attaching them
                          > you
                          > > > agree that, without giving up your rights to
                          > them,
                          >
                          === message truncated ===


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                        • Mike Creel
                          Joe: Old hay rake tines are a good idea, recycling, reusable and findable when seeking those finally rooted (and ready to move) azalea layers. I have been
                          Message 12 of 15 , Dec 10, 2005
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Joe:
                            Old hay rake tines are a good idea, recycling,
                            reusable and findable when seeking those finally
                            rooted (and ready to move) azalea layers. I have been
                            relying on Nature to make my azalea layers, but now I
                            want to quadruple layer production, so Nature will
                            need my help. I have a question, when pinning a
                            "future" layer (branch) to the ground, what things
                            should I do to prepare the branch and the ground
                            beneath? Do I need to scarify the bark on the
                            underside where the branch contacts the earth? Do I
                            need to scrape away all the mulch or leaves so the
                            contact of branch and soil is direct? How long should
                            it take for the layered branch to root well enough to
                            separate from the mother plant, and then to dig up?
                            Mike Creel, SC

                            --- Joe Schild <azaleajoe@...> wrote:

                            > Mike,
                            > Here is one for you to use as a hold-down. Some time
                            > back I was putting down large sections of weed block
                            > fabric and needed something to keep it in place. My
                            > back neighbor offered me loads of broken hay rake
                            > times from his rake he used on his large farm. These
                            > are about 12" long, 1/4" in diameter, and have a "U"
                            > shaped top or hook. They will drive in the ground
                            > with a hammer and actually hold irrigation lines in
                            > place too, which are much better than the U-wires
                            > the irrigation store sells.
                            >
                            > My daughter and son-in-law have used them as tent
                            > pegs. Since you have connections with a farm store
                            > in your area, you might ask around to see if any of
                            > the farmers have left-over hay rake tines. Most
                            > farmers just toss them into the scrap pile.
                            >
                            > Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
                            > Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
                            > http://www.azaleas.org
                            >
                            >
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: Mike Creel
                            > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: 12/10/05 11:06:28 AM
                            > Subject: Re: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas
                            >
                            >
                            > I like the idea of using small sections of old
                            > garden
                            > hose as a cushion for a coat hanger wire plant layer
                            > hold-down. Some time back a hardware store was going
                            > out of business down the road from me and I bought a
                            > batch of some kind of heavy gauge, but bendable
                            > wire,
                            > sold in straight pieces abour 6 feet long. I forget
                            > what they called it but it works great for stuff
                            > like
                            > making wire frame supports and hanging basket
                            > hangers.
                            > It would also work well for plant hold-downs, using
                            > a
                            > garden hose piece cushion.
                            >
                            > I went by the local farm supply store (or was it
                            > Lowes) earlier this year and bought a roll of
                            > electric
                            > fence wire which I use to secure propagation domes
                            > to
                            > pots of cuttings and wire mesh varmint caps to seed
                            > pots.
                            >
                            > Mike Creel, SC
                            >
                            > --- sjperk5 <sjperk5@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > > Mike
                            > >
                            > > Where I grew up in Indiana every good adhock
                            > > solution to holding
                            > > something started with either an piece of old
                            > inner
                            > > tube or garden
                            > > hose so how about a piece of garden hose and a
                            > coat
                            > > hanger?
                            > >
                            > > John
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel
                            > > <mikeacreel@y...> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > How about the large metal staples that are used
                            > to
                            > > put
                            > > > up old time wire fences, not the chain link
                            > ones.
                            > > > These fence staples are sharp on both ends and
                            > > plenty
                            > > > large in the throat for the diameter of most
                            > > limbs.
                            > > > One thing though, they may not be deep enough.
                            > Is
                            > > it
                            > > > best to wound the ground side of a branch for
                            > > > layering?
                            > > > Mike Creel, SC
                            > > >
                            > > > --- Barry Sperling <barrysperling@i...>
                            > > > wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > > Just to add a minor varient, I've had good
                            > luck
                            > > with
                            > > > > large nails and
                            > > > > taking a pair of pliers to bend them in a
                            > vise.
                            > > > > This U-shaped piece is
                            > > > > stuck into the ground and holds well. The
                            > point
                            > > to
                            > > > > this post is that
                            > > > > the larger diameter of the nails (about twice
                            > > that
                            > > > > of coathangers)
                            > > > > damages the branch less (I've had the branches
                            > > snap
                            > > > > on me).
                            > > > > Barry
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Mike Creel wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > >Thank you all for your ideas for making a
                            > plant
                            > > > > >staple. I like the forked stick proposed by
                            > > Paul
                            > > > > in
                            > > > > >chilly Indiana. I can find plenty of those
                            > on
                            > > > > sapling
                            > > > > >hickories in my woods and also use scraps
                            > from
                            > > > > >pruning. I think that one longer leg on the
                            > > fork
                            > > > > and
                            > > > > >one short leg would work great so you only
                            > > have to
                            > > > > >push one stick deep into the ground.
                            > > > > >Mike Creel, SC
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >--- "Lightfoot, Paul" <pllightfo@t...>
                            > > > > wrote:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >>Or how about just picking a forked stick and
                            > > using
                            > > > > >>it as a hold-down.
                            > > > > >>That way if you forget about it, you won't
                            > > have a
                            > > > > >>piece of metal to get
                            > > > > >>in a foot or a tire. It should last long
                            > > enough
                            > > > > for
                            > > > > >>rooting!
                            > > > > >>Paul Lightfoot
                            > > > > >>Zone 5b with 7 or so inches of snow last
                            > > night!
                            > > > > >>
                            > > > > >>-----Original Message-----
                            > > > > >>From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                            > > > > >>[mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                            > > > > >>Of Mike Creel
                            > > > > >>Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:50 PM
                            > > > > >>To: ASA Azaleaphiles
                            > > > > >>Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering
                            > azaleas
                            > > > > >>
                            > > > > >>I love to reuse and recycle household items
                            > in
                            > > > > >>horticulture. And I am trying to come up
                            > some
                            > > > > some
                            > > > > >>commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a
                            > > > > hold-down
                            > > > > >>clip for doing simple limb layering
                            > > propagation of
                            > > > > >>my
                            > > > > >>native azaleas. Today in the yard while
                            > going
                            > > to
                            > > > > >>pick
                            > > > > >>up the mail I noticed a goodly number of
                            > > "wannabe"
                            > > > > >>layers that just needed something to hold
                            > them
                            > > > > >>snugly
                            > > > > >>to the ground. I know everybody uses
                            > bricks,
                            > > but
                            > > > > I
                            > > > > >>want something smaller and less conspicuous
                            > > like
                            > > > > an
                            > > > > >>extra-long staple. I am toying with the
                            > idea
                            > > of
                            > > > > >>cutting off some metal shower curtain
                            > holders.
                            > > But
                            > > > > >>there has to be something (in multiples)
                            > just
                            > > > > laying
                            > > > > >>around to make "plant staples" out of. I
                            > > would
                            > > > > >>appreciate any and all suggestions. Hmm,
                            > some
                            >
                            === message truncated ===


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                          • Joe Schild
                            Mike, Some of the native species root by layering more easy than others. Hybrid cultivars seem to root easier still. About 15 years ago, I noted my very large
                            Message 13 of 15 , Dec 10, 2005
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Mike,
                              Some of the native species root by layering more easy than others. Hybrid cultivars seem to root easier still. About 15 years ago, I noted my very large R. austrinum was showing signs of die back with more and more dead wood each year. since this was one of my first native azaleas I ever rooted from cuttings, I wanted to keep it going. This particular plant seemd to put out many new growth shoots from the root crown, so I layered one shoot and it now is the primary plant as the older one slowly dies back to the ground.
                               
                              The method I used was to lightly scrape the bark down to the cambien layer, dust it with rooting hormone, and peg the shoot to the ground where I had mixed peat moss and sand into the native soil. I made sure the soil never dried out by putting about three inches of pine needles over the layer and watered it when needed. In two years, there were enough new roots to cut the shoot from the mother plant and I cut back any new growth to allow the roots to really extend. I never dug this new layer, but allowed it to continue to grow and slowly it is replacing the older plant. It is now 8' tall.
                               
                              Through the years I have tried this method on all of the eastern species with mixed results. Rhododendron cumberlandense does well as does, R. periclymenoides, R. canescens, R. atlantucum, R. arborescens, R. viscosum, R. viscosum var. serrulatum, and R. vaseyi. At the time, I did not have any R. falmmeum to try it on, but I think it will work on it too. The others had much lower success. It seems that those native azaleas that exibit tendances to send out stolens will root from layers much faster and with higher success.
                               
                              Of the hybrids cultivars, 'Oxidol', 'Copper Cloud', 'Brazil', 'Gibralter', 'Red Pom-Pom', 'Primrose', 'Mt. St. Helens', and 'Crimson Tide', all responded well to layering. The Asian species, R. weyrichi and R. sanctum layered too, with the latter one needing to be cut back very low to the ground to furnish new shoots close to the ground. The Shrine Azalea tends to grow tree like.
                               
                              I have tried the air layering method, but had little success since I tend to neglect them too long. As you know, the evergreen azaleas will layer faster and easier. I have dug the layers up after one year, but the deciduous azaleas seem to need a longer time to put out enough roots.  I tried mound layering several times and had great success by cutting the mother plant back with all the new emerging shoots level. I built a wood box to go around the plant and filled it with a mixture of 50% peat moss and 50% Perlite, all well moistened. As new shoots began to emerge through the top of the mixture, I added a second tier on the box filled with more mixture after wounding the new shoots. These shoots rooted in the boundry layer between the first and second tier, and were ready to cut loose from the mother plant in 2 years, then the process started all over again with even more new shoots. The key is keeping the mixture moist and not drowned. It is a fast way to poduce many rooted plants in a short time frame other than mist system or tissueculture, becvause each time you cut the rooted shoots from the mother plant, it produces more new shoots to root than you started with.
                               
                              Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
                              Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
                               
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: 12/10/05 6:34:25 PM
                              Subject: Re: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas

                              Joe:
                              Old hay rake tines are a good idea, recycling,
                              reusable and findable when seeking those finally
                              rooted (and ready to move) azalea layers. I have been
                              relying on Nature to make my azalea layers, but now I
                              want to quadruple layer production, so Nature will
                              need my help.  I have a question, when pinning a
                              "future" layer (branch) to the ground, what things
                              should I do to prepare the branch and the ground
                              beneath? Do I need to scarify the bark on the
                              underside where the branch contacts the earth? Do I
                              need to scrape away all the mulch or leaves so the
                              contact of branch and soil is direct?  How long should
                              it take for the layered branch to root well enough to
                              separate from the mother plant, and then to dig up?
                              Mike Creel, SC

                              --- Joe Schild <azaleajoe@...> wrote:

                              > Mike,
                              > Here is one for you to use as a hold-down. Some time
                              > back I was putting down large sections of weed block
                              > fabric and needed something to keep it in place. My
                              > back neighbor offered me loads of broken hay rake
                              > times from his rake he used on his large farm. These
                              > are about 12" long, 1/4" in diameter, and have a "U"
                              > shaped top or hook. They will drive in the ground
                              > with a hammer and actually hold irrigation lines in
                              > place too, which are much better than the U-wires
                              > the irrigation store sells.
                              >
                              > My daughter and son-in-law have used them as tent
                              > pegs. Since you have connections with a farm store
                              > in your area, you might ask around to see if any of
                              > the farmers have left-over hay rake tines. Most
                              > farmers just toss them into the scrap pile.
                              >
                              > Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
                              > Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
                              > http://www.azaleas.org
                              >
                              >
                              > ----- Original Message -----
                              > From: Mike Creel
                              > To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                              > Sent: 12/10/05 11:06:28 AM
                              > Subject: Re: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering azaleas
                              >
                              >
                              > I like the idea of using small sections of old
                              > garden
                              > hose as a cushion for a coat hanger wire plant layer
                              > hold-down. Some time back a hardware store was going
                              > out of business down the road from me and I bought a
                              > batch of some kind of heavy gauge, but bendable
                              > wire,
                              > sold in straight pieces abour 6 feet long.  I forget
                              > what they called it but it works great for stuff
                              > like
                              > making wire frame supports and hanging basket
                              > hangers.
                              > It would also work well for plant hold-downs, using
                              > a
                              > garden hose piece cushion.
                              >
                              > I went by the local farm supply store (or was it
                              > Lowes) earlier this year and bought a roll of
                              > electric
                              > fence wire which I use to secure propagation domes
                              > to
                              > pots of cuttings and wire mesh varmint caps to seed
                              > pots.
                              >
                              > Mike Creel, SC
                              >
                              > --- sjperk5 <sjperk5@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > > Mike
                              > >
                              > > Where I grew up in Indiana every good adhock
                              > > solution to holding
                              > > something started with either an piece of old
                              > inner
                              > > tube or garden
                              > > hose so how about a piece of garden hose and a
                              > coat
                              > > hanger?
                              > >
                              > > John
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > --- In azaleas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Creel
                              > > <mikeacreel@y...> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > How about the large metal staples that are used
                              > to
                              > > put
                              > > > up old time wire fences, not the chain link
                              > ones.
                              > > > These fence staples are sharp on both ends and
                              > > plenty
                              > > > large in the throat for the diameter of most
                              > > limbs.
                              > > > One thing though, they may not be deep enough.
                              > Is
                              > > it
                              > > > best to wound the ground side of a branch for
                              > > > layering?
                              > > > Mike Creel, SC
                              > > >
                              > > > --- Barry Sperling <barrysperling@i...>
                              > > > wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > > Just to add a minor varient, I've had good
                              > luck
                              > > with
                              > > > > large nails and
                              > > > > taking a pair of pliers to bend them in a
                              > vise.
                              > > > > This U-shaped piece is
                              > > > > stuck into the ground and holds well.  The
                              > point
                              > > to
                              > > > > this post is that
                              > > > > the larger diameter of the nails (about twice
                              > > that
                              > > > > of coathangers)
                              > > > > damages the branch less (I've had the branches
                              > > snap
                              > > > > on me).
                              > > > >     Barry
                              > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Mike Creel wrote:
                              > > > >
                              > > > > >Thank you all for your ideas for making a
                              > plant
                              > > > > >staple.  I like the forked stick proposed by
                              > > Paul
                              > > > > in
                              > > > > >chilly Indiana.  I can find plenty of those
                              > on
                              > > > > sapling
                              > > > > >hickories in my woods and also use scraps
                              > from
                              > > > > >pruning.  I think that one longer leg on the
                              > > fork
                              > > > > and
                              > > > > >one short leg would work great so you  only
                              > > have to
                              > > > > >push one stick deep into the ground.
                              > > > > >Mike Creel, SC
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > >--- "Lightfoot, Paul" <pllightfo@t...>
                              > > > > wrote:
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > 
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > >>Or how about just picking a forked stick and
                              > > using
                              > > > > >>it as a hold-down.
                              > > > > >>That way if you forget about it, you won't
                              > > have a
                              > > > > >>piece of metal to get
                              > > > > >>in a foot or a tire.  It should last long
                              > > enough
                              > > > > for
                              > > > > >>rooting!
                              > > > > >>Paul Lightfoot
                              > > > > >>Zone 5b with 7 or so inches of snow last
                              > > night!
                              > > > > >>
                              > > > > >>-----Original Message-----
                              > > > > >>From: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
                              > > > > >>[mailto:azaleas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                              > > > > >>Of Mike Creel
                              > > > > >>Sent: Friday, December 09, 2005 3:50 PM
                              > > > > >>To: ASA Azaleaphiles
                              > > > > >>Subject: [AZ] Hold-downs for layering
                              > azaleas
                              > > > > >>
                              > > > > >>I love to reuse and recycle household items
                              > in
                              > > > > >>horticulture.  And I am trying to come up
                              > some
                              > > > > some
                              > > > > >>commonplace discarded whats-it to use as a
                              > > > > hold-down
                              > > > > >>clip for doing simple limb layering
                              > > propagation of
                              > > > > >>my
                              > > > > >>native azaleas. Today in the yard while
                              > going
                              > > to
                              > > > > >>pick
                              > > > > >>up the mail I noticed a goodly number of
                              > > "wannabe"
                              > > > > >>layers that just needed something to hold
                              > them
                              > > > > >>snugly
                              > > > > >>to the ground.  I know everybody uses
                              > bricks,
                              > > but
                              > > > > I
                              > > > > >>want something smaller and less conspicuous
                              > > like
                              > > > > an
                              > > > > >>extra-long staple.  I am toying with the
                              > idea
                              > > of
                              > > > > >>cutting off some metal shower curtain
                              > holders.
                              > > But
                              > > > > >>there has to be something (in multiples)
                              > just
                              > > > > laying
                              > > > > >>around to make "plant staples" out of.  I
                              > > would
                              > > > > >>appreciate any and all suggestions.  Hmm,
                              > some
                              >
                              === message truncated ===


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                            • Mike Creel
                              Again I have struck gold by asking the right questions of the right person. That is why I have had success as a news and feature writer for the past 35 years
                              Message 14 of 15 , Dec 10, 2005
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                                Again I have struck gold by asking the right questions
                                of the right person. That is why I have had success
                                as a news and feature writer for the past 35 years and
                                more. Thank you Joe. Is winter an okay time to start
                                layers?
                                Mike Creel, SC, Zone 8A

                                --- Joe Schild <azaleajoe@...> wrote:

                                > Mike,
                                > Some of the native species root by layering more
                                > easy than others. Hybrid cultivars seem to root
                                > easier still. About 15 years ago, I noted my very
                                > large R. austrinum was showing signs of die back
                                > with more and more dead wood each year. since this
                                > was one of my first native azaleas I ever rooted
                                > from cuttings, I wanted to keep it going. This
                                > particular plant seemd to put out many new growth
                                > shoots from the root crown, so I layered one shoot
                                > and it now is the primary plant as the older one
                                > slowly dies back to the ground.
                                >
                                > The method I used was to lightly scrape the bark
                                > down to the cambien layer, dust it with rooting
                                > hormone, and peg the shoot to the ground where I had
                                > mixed peat moss and sand into the native soil. I
                                > made sure the soil never dried out by putting about
                                > three inches of pine needles over the layer and
                                > watered it when needed. In two years, there were
                                > enough new roots to cut the shoot from the mother
                                > plant and I cut back any new growth to allow the
                                > roots to really extend. I never dug this new layer,
                                > but allowed it to continue to grow and slowly it is
                                > replacing the older plant. It is now 8' tall.
                                >
                                > Through the years I have tried this method on all of
                                > the eastern species with mixed results. Rhododendron
                                > cumberlandense does well as does, R.
                                > periclymenoides, R. canescens, R. atlantucum, R.
                                > arborescens, R. viscosum, R. viscosum var.
                                > serrulatum, and R. vaseyi. At the time, I did not
                                > have any R. falmmeum to try it on, but I think it
                                > will work on it too. The others had much lower
                                > success. It seems that those native azaleas that
                                > exibit tendances to send out stolens will root from
                                > layers much faster and with higher success.
                                >
                                > Of the hybrids cultivars, 'Oxidol', 'Copper Cloud',
                                > 'Brazil', 'Gibralter', 'Red Pom-Pom', 'Primrose',
                                > 'Mt. St. Helens', and 'Crimson Tide', all responded
                                > well to layering. The Asian species, R. weyrichi and
                                > R. sanctum layered too, with the latter one needing
                                > to be cut back very low to the ground to furnish new
                                > shoots close to the ground. The Shrine Azalea tends
                                > to grow tree like.
                                >
                                > I have tried the air layering method, but had little
                                > success since I tend to neglect them too long. As
                                > you know, the evergreen azaleas will layer faster
                                > and easier. I have dug the layers up after one year,
                                > but the deciduous azaleas seem to need a longer time
                                > to put out enough roots. I tried mound layering
                                > several times and had great success by cutting the
                                > mother plant back with all the new emerging shoots
                                > level. I built a wood box to go around the plant and
                                > filled it with a mixture of 50% peat moss and 50%
                                > Perlite, all well moistened. As new shoots began to
                                > emerge through the top of the mixture, I added a
                                > second tier on the box filled with more mixture
                                > after wounding the new shoots. These shoots rooted
                                > in the boundry layer between the first and second
                                > tier, and were ready to cut loose from the mother
                                > plant in 2 years, then the process started all over
                                > again with even more new shoots. The key is keeping
                                > the mixture moist and not drowned. It is a fast way
                                > to poduce many rooted plants in a short time frame
                                > other than mist system or tissueculture, becvause
                                > each time you cut the rooted shoots from the mother
                                > plant, it produces more new shoots to root than you
                                > started with.
                                >
                                > Joe Schild-Hixson, TN USDA Zone 7a
                                > Ask a friend to join the Azalea Society of America!
                                > http://www.azaleas.org


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