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Re: [AZ] Self-pollinated VS Cross pollinated

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  • William C. Miller III
    Mike, There is self pollination... all the action occurring in one flower. There is close pollination between two flowers on the same plant. And there is
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 4, 2005
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      Mike,

      There is self pollination... all the action occurring in one flower.
      There is close pollination between two flowers on the same plant. And
      there is cross pollination between two different plants. Someone once
      told me that self pollination is relatively rare because pistils are
      rarely receptive when its own pollen is available. Any truth to that?

      The other factor that you should consider is that the options are not
      limited to the two plants on your property that are 15 feet apart. I
      don't know how far bees roam, but I'll bet it is farther than one would
      imagine.

      Bill Miller
      Bethesda, Maryland

      Mike Creel wrote:

      >I have some deciduous native azaleas that never set a
      >seed pod unless you hand pollinate them from an
      >unrelated second plant. But I have other azaleas,
      >like one Choice Creel atlanticum X austrinum hybrid,
      >that bloom alone and set heavy seed pod crops annually
      >with no nearby concurrently blooming cross-pollinator.
      >
      >My Rh. oblongifolium Sarah Ferguson has several seed
      >pods on it, and some 15 feet away is Weston's Pink and
      >Sweet that was blooming at the same time. Sarah has
      >some nice seed pods. And I am wondering if she selfed
      >or crossed with Pink and Sweet. Has anyone in the
      >group had a Sarah Ferguson make seed pods and have
      >they grown the seedlings out to bloom?
      >
      >Mike Creel, SC, Zone 8A
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Mike Creel
      Bill, I have always heard that pure species azaleas are routinely self-infertile, thus flowers from the same plant, a runner of that plant or a clone of that
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 5, 2005
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        Bill, I have always heard that pure species azaleas
        are routinely self-infertile, thus flowers from the
        same plant, a runner of that plant or a clone of that
        plant will not pollinate each other effectively. But
        a seed sibling of a azalea should be able to pollinate
        a related plant.

        I observe few to no seed pods in my cloned beds of
        Snow, Pride of Mobile and Chinzan. But a Glacier
        growing right beside one Snow, sets pods well every
        year. In colonial beds of atlanticum in the wild on
        my family farm I never see seed pods. But when I
        moved some of those plants to my home, where two
        unrelated atlanticums are nearby, good seed pods form
        with no hand pollination.

        My experiment this recent past season with
        hand-selfing prunifolium, arborescens, and eastmanii
        formed NO pods. But I did hand cross-pollination with
        unrelated plants of the same species, and good pods
        formed. All pollinated trusses were well tagged and
        dated.

        So, I believe that the pure forms of the species are
        self-infertile, but hybrids are usually not, and can
        pollinate themselves, like my Choice Cream does.

        Mike Creel

        --- "William C. Miller III" <bill@...>
        wrote:

        > Mike,
        >
        > There is self pollination... all the action
        > occurring in one flower.
        > There is close pollination between two flowers on
        > the same plant. And
        > there is cross pollination between two different
        > plants. Someone once
        > told me that self pollination is relatively rare
        > because pistils are
        > rarely receptive when its own pollen is available.
        > Any truth to that?
        >
        > The other factor that you should consider is that
        > the options are not
        > limited to the two plants on your property that are
        > 15 feet apart. I
        > don't know how far bees roam, but I'll bet it is
        > farther than one would
        > imagine.
        >
        > Bill Miller
        > Bethesda, Maryland
        >
        > Mike Creel wrote:
        >
        > >I have some deciduous native azaleas that never set
        > a
        > >seed pod unless you hand pollinate them from an
        > >unrelated second plant. But I have other azaleas,
        > >like one Choice Creel atlanticum X austrinum
        > hybrid,
        > >that bloom alone and set heavy seed pod crops
        > annually
        > >with no nearby concurrently blooming
        > cross-pollinator.
        > >
        > >My Rh. oblongifolium Sarah Ferguson has several
        > seed
        > >pods on it, and some 15 feet away is Weston's Pink
        > and
        > >Sweet that was blooming at the same time. Sarah
        > has
        > >some nice seed pods. And I am wondering if she
        > selfed
        > >or crossed with Pink and Sweet. Has anyone in the
        > >group had a Sarah Ferguson make seed pods and have
        > >they grown the seedlings out to bloom?
        > >
        > >Mike Creel, SC, Zone 8A
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >




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        Yahoo! Mail - PC Magazine Editors' Choice 2005
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      • linda foss
        I have 4 seed pods from my azaleas. what should I do to try to get them to germinate. Do I start now? should I germinate them on a paper towel? In the refridge
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 7, 2005
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          I have 4 seed pods from my azaleas.  what should I do to try to get them to germinate.  Do I start now?  should I germinate them on a paper towel?   In the refridge first for stratification?   Please direct me to where i might find some directions.  I have gotten about 10 seeds from two year old rose hips to germinate and sprout up so far, so i am not giving up on trying to do this with my azaleas!
          Thanks!!




          Linda lbfoss@...

          From: Mike Creel <mikeacreel@...>
          Reply-To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [AZ] Self-pollinated VS Cross pollinated
          Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2005 07:22:52 -0700 (PDT)

          Bill, I have always heard that pure species azaleas
          are routinely self-infertile, thus flowers from the
          same plant, a runner of that plant or a clone of that
          plant will not pollinate  each other effectively.  But
          a seed sibling of a azalea should be able to pollinate
          a related plant. 

          I observe few to no seed pods in my cloned beds of
          Snow, Pride of Mobile and Chinzan.  But a Glacier
          growing right beside one Snow, sets pods well every
          year.  In colonial beds of atlanticum in the wild on
          my family farm I never see seed pods.  But when I
          moved some of those plants to my home, where two
          unrelated atlanticums are nearby, good seed pods form
          with no hand pollination.

          My experiment this recent past season with
          hand-selfing prunifolium, arborescens, and eastmanii
          formed NO pods.  But I did hand cross-pollination with
          unrelated plants of the same species, and good pods
          formed.  All pollinated trusses were well tagged and
          dated.

          So, I believe that the pure forms of the species are
          self-infertile, but hybrids are usually not, and can
          pollinate themselves, like my Choice Cream does.

          Mike Creel

          --- "William C. Miller III" <bill@...>
          wrote:

          > Mike,
          >
          > There is self pollination... all the action
          > occurring in one flower. 
          > There is close pollination between two flowers on
          > the same plant.  And
          > there is cross pollination between two different
          > plants.  Someone once
          > told me that self pollination is relatively rare
          > because pistils are
          > rarely receptive when its own pollen is available.
          > Any truth to that?
          >
          > The other factor that you should consider is that
          > the options are not
          > limited to the two plants on your property that are
          > 15 feet apart.  I
          > don't know how far bees roam, but I'll bet it is
          > farther than one would
          > imagine.
          >
          > Bill Miller
          > Bethesda, Maryland
          >
          > Mike Creel wrote:
          >
          > >I have some deciduous native azaleas that never set
          > a
          > >seed pod  unless you hand pollinate them from an
          > >unrelated second plant.  But I have other azaleas,
          > >like one Choice Creel atlanticum X austrinum
          > hybrid,
          > >that bloom alone and set heavy seed pod crops
          > annually
          > >with no nearby concurrently blooming
          > cross-pollinator.
          > >
          > >My Rh. oblongifolium Sarah Ferguson has several
          > seed
          > >pods on it, and some 15 feet away is Weston's Pink
          > and
          > >Sweet that was blooming at the same time.  Sarah
          > has
          > >some nice seed pods.  And I am wondering if she
          > selfed
          > >or crossed with Pink and Sweet.  Has anyone in the
          > >group had a Sarah Ferguson make seed pods and have
          > >they grown the seedlings out to bloom?
          > >
          > >Mike Creel, SC, Zone 8A
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > 
          > >
          >
          >
          >



                     
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        • Mike Creel
          There are a lot of complicated ways to work with azalea seeds, but I do it the simplest. Just put the mature seed pods into an airy paper envelope or bag and
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 8, 2005
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            There are a lot of complicated ways to work with
            azalea seeds, but I do it the simplest. Just put the
            mature seed pods into an airy paper envelope or bag
            and let them dry at room temperature for a week or
            more. Then remove the seed from the opening pods.
            Pliers can be used to open still closed but dry pods.

            Now you can go the route of planting seeds indoors
            under lights in a clear sweater box of moist long
            fiber sphagnum moss and baby them all winter. Or you
            can use my all-season outdoors method of just
            preparing some pots for fast drainage, using a fast
            draining media, sprinkling seeds onto the media, and
            covering the pot with a "varmint cap" made of wire
            mesh (hardware cloth). More details of this method
            are posted on line at the azalea society web site. I
            plant seed and stick cuttings when I can get them.

            Mike Creel, SC, Zone 8A

            --- linda foss <lbfoss@...> wrote:

            I have 4 seed pods from my azaleas. what should I do
            to try to get them to germinate. Do I start now?
            should I germinate them on a paper towel? In the
            refridge first for stratification? Please direct me
            to where i might find some directions. I have gotten
            about 10 seeds from two year old rose hips to
            germinate and sprout up so far, so i am not giving up
            on trying to do this with my azaleas!
            Thanks!!




            Linda lbfoss@...
            ---------------------------------
            From: Mike Creel <mikeacreel@...>
            Reply-To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
            To: azaleas@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [AZ] Self-pollinated VS Cross pollinated
            Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2005 07:22:52 -0700 (PDT)

            Bill, I have always heard that pure species azaleas
            are routinely self-infertile, thus flowers from the
            same plant, a runner of that plant or a clone of that
            plant will not pollinate each other effectively. But
            a seed sibling of a azalea should be able to pollinate
            a related plant.

            I observe few to no seed pods in my cloned beds of
            Snow, Pride of Mobile and Chinzan. But a Glacier
            growing right beside one Snow, sets pods well every
            year. In colonial beds of atlanticum in the wild on
            my family farm I never see seed pods. But when I
            moved some of those plants to my home, where two
            unrelated atlanticums are nearby, good seed pods form
            with no hand pollination.

            My experiment this recent past season with
            hand-selfing prunifolium, arborescens, and eastmanii
            formed NO pods. But I did hand cross-pollination with
            unrelated plants of the same species, and good pods
            formed. All pollinated trusses were well tagged and
            dated.

            So, I believe that the pure forms of the species are
            self-infertile, but hybrids are usually not, and can
            pollinate themselves, like my Choice Cream does.

            Mike Creel

            --- "William C. Miller III" <bill@...>
            wrote:

            > Mike,
            >
            > There is self pollination... all the action
            > occurring in one flower.
            > There is close pollination between two flowers on
            > the same plant. And
            > there is cross pollination between two different
            > plants. Someone once
            > told me that self pollination is relatively rare
            > because pistils are
            > rarely receptive when its own pollen is available.
            > Any truth to that?
            >
            > The other factor that you should consider is that
            > the options are not
            > limited to the two plants on your property that are
            > 15 feet apart. I
            > don't know how far bees roam, but I'll bet it is
            > farther than one would
            > imagine.
            >
            > Bill Miller
            > Bethesda, Maryland
            >
            > Mike Creel wrote:
            >
            > >I have some deciduous native azaleas that never set
            > a
            > >seed pod unless you hand pollinate them from an
            > >unrelated second plant. But I have other azaleas,
            > >like one Choice Creel atlanticum X austrinum
            > hybrid,
            > >that bloom alone and set heavy seed pod crops
            > annually
            > >with no nearby concurrently blooming
            > cross-pollinator.
            > >
            > >My Rh. oblongifolium Sarah Ferguson has several
            > seed
            > >pods on it, and some 15 feet away is Weston's Pink
            > and
            > >Sweet that was blooming at the same time. Sarah
            > has
            > >some nice seed pods. And I am wondering if she
            > selfed
            > >or crossed with Pink and Sweet. Has anyone in the
            > >group had a Sarah Ferguson make seed pods and have
            > >they grown the seedlings out to bloom?
            > >
            > >Mike Creel, SC, Zone 8A
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >




            __________________________________
            Yahoo! Mail - PC Magazine Editors' Choice 2005
            http://mail.yahoo.com


            When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its relevant
            part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest -
            especially this line and the Yahoo lines. And PLEASE
            tell us your city, state and/or USDA zone.

            We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB
            in size - 640 x 480 pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40
            compression are ideal. By attaching them you agree
            that, without giving up your rights to them, they may
            be shown on Azalea Society websites.

            To unsubscribe, send an email to:
            azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com





            SPONSORED LINKS
            Azalea florist Azalea mortgage Azalea plant Azalea inn
            Azalea Azalea shoes

            ---------------------------------
            YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


            Visit your group "azaleas" on the web.

            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
            Terms of Service.


            ---------------------------------






            When you reply to an email, PLEASE quote its relevant
            part(s) only, as context, and DELETE the rest -
            especially this line and the Yahoo lines. And PLEASE
            tell us your city, state and/or USDA zone.

            We welcome attached images RESIZED to be under 100KB
            in size - 640 x 480 pixel JPEG images at 50% or 1:40
            compression are ideal. By attaching them you agree
            that, without giving up your rights to them, they may
            be shown on Azalea Society websites.

            To unsubscribe, send an email to:
            azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com





            SPONSORED LINKS
            Azalea
            florist Azalea
            mortgage Azalea
            plant
            Azalea inn
            Azalea Azalea
            shoes


            ---------------------------------
            YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


            Visit your group "azaleas" on the web.

            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            azaleas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
            Terms of Service.


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