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Re: shibori

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  • Bob Stelloh
    At 3:05 PM -0700 on 4/4/04, Colleen or Henry Gaines wrote ... Thanks for asking us. All good questions, and I m sorry we have a confusing writeup. To
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 4, 2004
      At 3:05 PM -0700 on 4/4/04, Colleen or Henry Gaines wrote
      >I was trying to determine the proper reference for the darker dots
      >of color on some of the petals of what I think is a "George Taber"
      >Azalea. I initially thought they might be glands. That does not seem
      >to be the case. The information presented and the glossary confuses
      >me regarding the terms, variation, and variegation.
      >Are there "variations" among Azalea flowers and some of these
      >"variations " are "variegations" ? The pattern types of the
      >variegations are described as "shibori" ?

      Thanks for asking us. All good questions, and I'm sorry we have a
      confusing writeup. To complicate it a little more, the darker dots on
      the upper petal of 'George Lindley Tabor' are usually referred to as
      a "blotch". Many azaleas have such blotches.

      >I did not see just the term Shibori in the glossary, but a preceding
      >statement indicated that Shibori translated as variation, rather
      >than variegation.
      >I suppose I should just refer to them as"markings".

      See <http://www.azaleas.org/azflowers.html#pat>, where I get the
      impression that "shibori" translates as "variegation". I think
      "shibori" = "variation" = "variegation" = "marking" = "pattern". Or
      at least I do not know of any meaningful differences between those
      terms, and I tend to use them interchangeably (except not shibori -
      see below).

      >
      >Does the term shibori apply to Satsuki azaleas also?

      I think more like "only" rather than "also". In the US we usually
      talk about pattern or variation.

      >Is there a function of shibori other than insect appeal ?

      The color patterns may have started out as an insect appeal
      mechanism, and now breeders try to breed blotches and patterns in, or
      out, depending on their concept of beauty.

      >Thank you.

      Thank *you*! Based on your comments, we will clean up the
      nomenclature a bit and save others from the confusing terminology.

      Regards,
      Bob Stelloh
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